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Phil46

Hive tasks

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Phil46    449

OK,so I get to hives and find wax on mats ,top of frames and drone brood between boxes.Propolis on frame ends and around box edges etc. 

Is cleaning and scraping all this while in the hive part of ur normal tasks while at the hive? Do you carry containers around to collect all this as you go? 

Also when do you call a queen a drone layer? How much drone brood are we talking about,per hive or per frame?

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yesbut    3,477
1 hour ago, Phil46 said:

Is cleaning and scraping all this while in the hive part of ur normal tasks while at the hive?

Yes, every opportunity you get.

 

1 hour ago, Phil46 said:

Do you carry containers around to collect all this as you go? 

Only if you want to

 

1 hour ago, Phil46 said:

Also when do you call a queen a drone laye

When there's no worker brood

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M4tt    2,597

I have a container with a lid ( Bees are keen to rob scraped wax at certain times of the year) . Wax from hives with no feeder or hives being fed gets put into container , then home to the solar wax melter. 

 

I aim to have top feeders on my hives all year round and when they aren’t being used the scrapings go back into the feeder to be cleaned by the Bees . 

 

I scrape most surplus wax off every visit . It makes the hives easier to work next time 

Edited by M4tt
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M4tt    2,597

Once a queen is laying drones in worker cells , as well as workers in worker cells , she is well on the way to being no good ( not to be mistaken for drone cells in amongst worker cells )

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Stoney    31

This time of year drone production is high however you should still have big slabs of worker brood ( depending on the state of your brood frames) 

when she runs out of puff you will see drone brood all over the broodframe instead of just around the bottom edges or areas the bees have repaired the comb. 

Its best to scrape end bars etc every time you are in there, unscraped endbars lead to gaps between brood frames which leads to comb drawn out wider which leads to less room ( beespace) between frames which of course can lead to rolling bees and possibly the queen. 

Scrape into an empty super with a mat screwed as a base and keep a mat on it for robbing . 

Nice n tidy. 

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GoDamit    44

I filled an ice cream container with drone brood from 2 drone traps a couple weeks ago. It's like candy for chickens.

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Phil46    449

Ka pai! Good to hear...so a plastic bag is carried around now while doing hive visits collecting all the wax ,propolis mats on order.

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GoDamit    44

Today I filled another ice cream container of drone brood from both hives. They are defiantly not lacking in drone numbers.

Still only play cups so far.

Both hives appear very strong, bare foundation FD supers went on 3-4 weeks ago, they're both approx 90% drawn, 75% filled and 50% capped.

Alcohol wash results from today were 3 from one hive and over 40 from the other. eek.

I had a small brain fade 3-4 weeks ago when i decided to put supers on, forgetting completely about spring mite treatments. So The hive with tons of mites got emergency Bayvarol treatment today and that honey super I won't extract, I'll feed it back to that hive probably come winter time. I believe It is safe to eat the honey, only the wax absorbs flumethrin and comb honey is potentially unsafe for human consumption, but from searching the web, most people would much rather not have their honey exposed to these synthetic chemicals.

 

Question: With a current mite count of 3 in my other hive, using drone trapping and culling, possibly a sugar sprinkle treatment, monitoring the situation, do you think i could get away without spring synthetic treatment.

 

I hope the hive with the Bayvarol doesn't get desperate for space before 6 weeks is up, I'm guessing it will tho. I'll have to grease up to a friend to let me store some of those (not for human consumption) frames in her deep freezer and give the bees more frames to work on.

The 3 count hive, if I can get away without synthetics, I'll put a second super on next week. (and buy some hive straps) I was thinking for the next super i'll checkerboard foundation frames with some bare non wired frames to a: cut the costs a little and b: i'm guessing comb honey is nicer without the foundation and much easier to cut at harvest if there are no wires in the way. I've seen lots of videos of people dropping combs from foundation-less, non wired frames so I know the care that needs to be taken when handling, especially a half drawn comb that's full of nectar.

 

Oh my science the aroma that comes from a beehive is amazing. That sweet warm wax smell.

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john berry    2,169

I would use foundation and wires. It's easy enough to remove wires by snipping them at each end and wiring up an old pair of pliers to a car battery. You hold the wire at one end with the pliers and touch the other end of the wire with something like a nail wired onto the other terminal and zit it's gone. For comb honey I use thin super foundation. If you really must go wire and foundationless you will find the frames work just as well and are a lot stronger if you put a central bar horizontally through the middle of the frame. I use a 10 mm times 23 mm bar which is the same size as my simplicity bottom bars. Melting a strip of foundation onto the top bar and mid bar will help get them started. As for the varoa it's your choice but I have found even very low numbers at this time of year lead to major problems before the autumn treatment.

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