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Rob Stockley

August 2017 Apiary Diary

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Philbee    1,250
Will you need a tractor to get it out.

Rain all next week on and off.

Last August we had 50mls for the month.

This August 86mls already

No just a winch.

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Alastair    3,903
Posted (edited)

My truck I got the winch, some strops, and 100 meters of rope. Any dodgy situations I always make sure to stay within range of some anchor point.

 

All the same, I'd rather stay out when it's that bad, making a big mess in someones paddock is never a good look.

Edited by Guest

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kaihoka    644
My truck I got the winch, some strops, and 100 meters of rope. Any dodgy situations I always make sure to stay within range of some anchor point.

 

All the same, I'd rather stay out when it's that bad, making a big mess in someones paddock is never a good look.

this bog situation must be the last things commercial beeks need now on top of last years difficult season.

but i suppose it is a red rooster year, things were destined to be difficult.

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yesbut    3,152

I spent a bit of the morning scoping around for early swarms...

5992ebd3c5698_IMG_20170811_110417(Medium).jpg.b46fef5a06ea70a56c0a755c40eee299.jpg

5992ebd3c5698_IMG_20170811_110417(Medium).jpg.b46fef5a06ea70a56c0a755c40eee299.jpg

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kaihoka    644
I spent a bit of the morning scoping around for early swarms...

[ATTACH=full]18219[/ATTACH]

Did you have to leave nelson to find some sun

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dansar    3,952
I spent a bit of the morning scoping around for early swarms...

[ATTACH=full]18219[/ATTACH]

Out doing some skids on the road side aye;)

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Over Worker    883

We had a concrete truck bogged at an under pass site today, every where we go it's mud...pleased I was able to get to hive sites last weekend that need reasonably dry ground conditions.

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MissEmmz    25
i have eaten weka stew.

it has to be cooked a long time .

its quite strong and tough. a bit like black swan.

 

 

I'd imagine Mutton bird like!

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kaihoka    644
I'd imagine Mutton bird like!

Drier and tougher , mutton bird greasy But tender .

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tommy dave    280

went through my wellington garden hive today. Build-up well underway, even starting to cap a bit of drone brood. Some varroa sampling via drone brood destruction suggests it might be appropriate to treat fairly soon.

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Kiwifruiter    465

Went through a 20 hive site today when it wasnt raining, putting in spring treatments and giving a little feed. All up most hives had a little new nectar and honey reserves so only got a splash of syrup. I gave each hive a pollen patty as well, that site was very slow to build up last year and I think lack of pollen was part of the problem. I also got some good news-Surgery (for carpel tunnel) on the 4th of september so got a busy few weeks ahead making sure everything is happy for being left alone for most of a month.....

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Rob Stockley    2,365
Posted (edited)

Started my spring rounds yesterday. Full AFB check and Apivar going in. So far all queens present and laying. Most have come out of winter with about 2/3 FD of bees and a couple of half frames of brood. Not strong by any stretch but pleased to see healthy patterns after last year's varroa treatment failures. Seeing loads of crystallized willow dew in empty frames - a lot more than last year.

 

There was one exceptional hive with eight slabs in the bottom box extending up into the lower top box. Lower outside frames were pollen. The rest of the top box was still capped honey. Every brood frame was crawling with recently emerged workers. This colony was a swarm removed from a gate post about half a kilometer down the road from a large commercial dump site. They responded well to the OA/gl treatment with mite numbers consistently low last season. I'll requeen the rest of last season's swarms with her daughters and see how they perform compared with my current line.

Edited by Guest
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M4tt    2,453

It's a warm sunnyish day in the Waikato , and it's two weeks since I put in my varroa treatment , controversial though it may be .

I'm using Api Life Var , simply because two Commercials around me appear to get very good varroa control with it. I was going to do some kind of monitoring , but none of my hives have come through winter riddled .

Still , the wafers went into everything . In my experience , low or no count hives are a prime target for varroa as they are ramping up with brood .

 

So I popped a few lids, pulled some frames and had a look .

I liked what I saw . Solid brood pattern , queens are laying well , and there is more nectar and pollen being stored than what is being used , even in weaker hives . The bees look active and healthy .

 

In a couple of weeks I will sugar shake some that did have mites to see where they are heading .

 

You'd really need to like the smell of eucalyptus and menthol to use this treatment , because it is quite strong .

 

The other thing I noticed is it definitely puts bees off using syrup out of the top feeders . I was feeding some nucs before treatment , which was going well , but they haven't really touched it since treatment started .

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glynn    1,069

Good day to have the second Selwyn beekeepers good turn out see some old faces and meet lots of new ones. Got to demo the new vapouriser and test some hives with a alcohol wash very surprised to find zero mites as it was a problem hive not so long ago.

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CraBee    270
It's a warm sunnyish day in the Waikato , and it's two weeks since I put in my varroa treatment , controversial though it may be .

I'm using Api Life Var , simply because two Commercials around me appear to get very good varroa control with it. I was going to do some kind of monitoring , but none of my hives have come through winter riddled .

Still , the wafers went into everything . In my experience , low or no count hives are a prime target for varroa as they are ramping up with brood .

 

So I popped a few lids, pulled some frames and had a look .

I liked what I saw . Solid brood pattern , queens are laying well , and there is more nectar and pollen being stored than what is being used , even in weaker hives . The bees look active and healthy .

 

In a couple of weeks I will sugar shake some that did have mites to see where they are heading .

 

You'd really need to like the smell of eucalyptus and menthol to use this treatment , because it is quite strong .

 

The other thing I noticed is it definitely puts bees off using syrup out of the top feeders . I was feeding some nucs before treatment , which was going well , but they haven't really touched it since treatment started .

 

@M4tt I've not used that but I understood that average daily temperatures needed to be between about 16C and 30C to use it. Are the commercials using it at the moment?

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M4tt    2,453
Posted (edited)
@M4tt I've not used that but I understood that average daily temperatures needed to be between about 16C and 30C to use it. Are the commercials using it at the moment?

Yes. They went in early August just before mine did . Daytime temp is getting to 16 or 17 some days . I'm not sure how important the temp thing is

Edited by Guest

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john berry    2,003

I have found thymol products to be unreliable and they also seem to decrease bees defences against robbing so it's probably not a good idea to feed sugar at the same time. I also got the strong impression that they cause an increase in feed consumption. I know some people have got them to work and I would use them if I had nothing else but not happily.

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Rob Stockley    2,365
Posted (edited)

Finished my spring rounds today.

 

One queen gone drone layer and/or laying worker. Moved a struggling colony (queen plus 500 bees) into its place. Caged the queen, added a frame of emerging bees plus nurses (from a third hive), then dumped all the bees of the failed hive onto the ground in front. I'll go back tomorrow evening and uncage the queen.

 

At a remote site I came across one hive that is stuffed due to varroa. Queen still laying, brood present but massive amount of DWV and stuff all adult bees. I'll go back this week and remove the queen to a nuc with emerging brood from a donor hive. The remaining bees can beg into a neighbouring hive. The stores will go to marked colonies.

 

The last six months has been very educational.

Edited by Guest
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Over Worker    883
Finished my spring rounds today.

 

One queen gone drone layer and/or laying worker. Moved a struggling colony (queen plus 500 bees) into its place. Caged the queen, added a frame of emerging bees plus nurses (from a third hive), then dumped all the bees of the failed hive onto the ground in front. I'll go back tomorrow evening and uncage the queen.

 

At a remote site I came across one hive that is stuffed due to varroa. Queen still laying, brood present but massive amount of DWV and stuff all adult bees. I'll go back this week and remove the queen to a nuc with emerging brood from a donor hive. The remaining bees can beg into a neighbouring hive. The stores will go to marked colonies.

 

The last six months has been very educational.

Things all start to change when you go over the 10 plus hive's / multiple site threshold :bee:

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yesbut    3,152
Things all start to change when you go over the 10 plus hive's / multiple site threshold :bee:

Why would anyone do that to themselves ?

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Kiwifruiter    465
Things all start to change when you go over the 10 plus hive's / multiple site threshold :bee:

Yup that's when the addiction really kicks in....

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Why would anyone do that to themselves ?

 

I take it you are a long-term beekeeper but only have a couple of hives by the sounds of it - what do you do with swarm control / splits? Do you sell off the 'excess' growth or just manage to keep the bees from swarming in other ways?

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Rob Stockley    2,365
Posted (edited)
Things all start to change when you go over the 10 plus hive's / multiple site threshold :bee:

In many ways for the better. I have a far greater exposure to hives in varying states of good and bad than I would have had if I'd stayed with a few hives on one site. I also have resources to fix issues as I find them without the mad scramble to beg or borrow assistance from other beekeepers. The variety and challenges are what appeals to me in beekeeping.

Edited by Guest
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yesbut    3,152
I take it you are a long-term beekeeper but only have a couple of hives by the sounds of it - what do you do with swarm control / splits? Do you sell off the 'excess' growth or just manage to keep the bees from swarming in other ways?

 

Swarm control for me is usually a non event, my colonies never build up enough to try. I don't split. Bees just don't seem to like my place much and simply never build up to anything like the multistoried crowds up north. Which is fine, I don't want an all consuming hobby, I just like a few bees around the place. (I'd have carnies if I thought I could keep them grey, I like grey bees) I like to experiment with varroa control, I never feed them. There's a commercial not far from me who seems to have to build up massive double queen hives to get a single box of crop. His double Q hives are a great source of swarms, and are what I usually start the new season with after my last lot have carked.

And before anyone leaps in, my casual bee care regime does not extend to lackadaisical AFB inspections !

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