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Ahol

varroa strips and oxalic?

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Ahol    0

Hi all. I noticed a high varroa load in my hive and as I'm after more hives and not honey I put bayvarol strips in and did a mite drop count. I counted over 100 mites dropped in ~14 hours after the strips went in which seems to me to be a shedload. This has got me concerned about the survival of the hive.

 

So how fast does bayvarol work - I.e. Should I help my girls out with oxalic vapor (now that it has arrived) and let the strips take care of the varroa in capped cells, or should I just let the strips do their thing?

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Kiwifruiter    473

I have been told that bayvarol hits hard and kills most of the varroa in the first 48 hours. I would leave it for a week then do a sugar shake/alcohol wash to see if its working....

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Rob Stockley    2,558
and let the strips take care of the varroa in capped cells, or should I just let the strips do their thing?

Bayvarol won't kill mites in capped cells. The mites get killed as they come out of cells hence the relatively long treatment time. The initial drop you've noted will be phoretic mites that were on the bees themselves not in cells.

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tristan    2,892
I noticed a high varroa load in my hive

how did you notice ?

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Ahol    0

Bit of sacbrood, dwv, and saw some on the bees and running around

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M4tt    2,541

How big is your hive ?

From what you describe, 100 mites falling doesn't sound like enough if you can 'see' varroa in the hive

 

You should do a sugar shake

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tristan    2,892
Bit of sacbrood, dwv, and saw some on the bees and running around

mites on bees doesn't mean much but sacbrood and DWV does.

mite checking would be the best thing to do. sugar or alcohol wash.

you simply could have a large amount of mite resistance to bayvarol, but 14 hours is a little to soon. give it 48hrs then check.

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Ahol    0
How big is your hive ?

 

Hive is 2 brood and 1 super, all FD.

 

Saw 5 more dwv bees being dragged out of hive today. Will do sugar shake tomorrow if its not raining and report back.

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Ahol    0

Did the sugar shake this evening. From just under a cup of bees I counted 8 varroa.

 

Does that seem high? The Bayvarol strips went in on Tuesday evening

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M4tt    2,541
Did the sugar shake this evening. From just under a cup of bees I counted 8 varroa.

So the standard sugar shake is half a cup, which is easy enough to get if you jiggle / pour the bees into a half cup measure over the top of your open hive .

 

So we'll go with a count if 4 to 5.

Yes, it seems a bit high . I'd like to have seen bayvarol take them out by now.

Even if they are new varroa out of cells that the bayvarol hasn't yet killed, it still seems high .

I suspect, but can't be sure, that an alternative treatment would be wise

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Ahol    0

Thanks, the sugar shake seemed high to me, but wasn't sure.

 

Would oxalic vapour be the best? 1 dose now and then check and maybe do again in a week or so if necessary?

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Trevor Gillbanks    4,478
Thanks, the sugar shake seemed high to me, but wasn't sure.

 

Would oxalic vapour be the best? 1 dose now and then check and maybe do again in a week or so if necessary?

Minimum of 3 treatments 7 days apart. Then retest.

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M4tt    2,541

With oxalic vapour, you will have a continual problem of varroa hiding safely in capped cells.

MAQS will kill varroa in brood as well as those on bees.

Then, maintenance doses of oxalic vapour may work once you've knocked the population back

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Ahol    0

I treated them with oxalic on Monday evening, as I don't have any MAQS or formic acid. Will do that for 2 more weeks and fingers crossed its all good. Planning to use formic as an autumn treatment on my hives.

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Tomm    11

Are beekeepers still using Apistan.I was going to use it this weekend..after a sugar test?

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Phil46    405

Question for use...is it too early for bayvarol for autumn?

After the 8 week stand down,say I tested and mite level still high would I do another round of strips? Or an alternative tr estment?

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kaihoka    785
I treated them with oxalic on Monday evening, as I don't have any MAQS or formic acid. Will do that for 2 more weeks and fingers crossed its all good. Planning to use formic as an autumn treatment on my hives.

Do it for 4 weeks or 5

You need more than 3 weeks

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Philbee    1,445
Question for use...is it too early for bayvarol for autumn?

After the 8 week stand down,say I tested and mite level still high would I do another round of strips? Or an alternative tr estment?

Its a curly question Phil

End of the day if the mite load is still high after treatment then you need to retreat and I would use something different than the first treatment.

All this DIY acid talk is not for everyone but you could use MAQS or Apivar

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Phil46    405
Its a curly question Phil

End of the day if the mite load is still high after treatment then you need to retreat and I would use something different than the first treatment.

All this DIY acid talk is not for everyone but you could use MAQS or Apivar

Sweet as mate....hopefully I won't need to but UV confirmed my thoughts...Maqs it will be.

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HSV_Darren    228
With oxalic vapour, you will have a continual problem of varroa hiding safely in capped cells.

MAQS will kill varroa in brood as well as those on bees.

Then, maintenance doses of oxalic vapour may work once you've knocked the population back

This is what I'm experiencing with a couple of hives, varroa going back into cells and not getting hit with the oxalic acid when treating once a week, I have two hives that have huge varroa numbers, I have been treating them every Saturday for 10 weeks when I'm at the apiary site, I haven't been in the hives for a while due to the weather, I seems every time I'm at the site it's too windy and cold, or raining, so I do another oxalic acid treatment and continue with my chores and leave, I got a big surprise when I went into the hive to discover huge varroa numbers with a sugar shake, I thought I could use oxalic acid for my primary and only varroa control, but can see it's not working, successfully treating varroa with only oxalic acid emplys that the varroa once emerged hang around for up to 7 days on the frames and bees before going back into a cell ready for capping, but this doesn't happen, so MAQS is going in very soon, and not sure about the oxalic acid and when to use it now.

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Rob Stockley    2,558

I treat OA vapour as a maintenance treatment early in the season. If mites are low (but not zero) then a course of OA will slow their progress and may allow the bees to out breed the mites. If the mite load is already high or if the bees are not increasing numbers then OA vapour is less effective, possibly not effective at all.

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M4tt    2,541

Yep. It's good on swarms , or as @Rob Stockley mentions , low count hives.

There are people who use oxalic vapour as their sole varroa control , but I've not managed to.

 

Bear in mind, MAQS this late on hives with high varroa loading will be very tough on them . You will probably get loads of dead bees , and the issue is, time is running late to produce healthy new winter bees . You will probably need to reduce hive size to match the population size after treatment, and nurse them through winter. However, you have little choice

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HSV_Darren    228

I wonder how many time a week people use oxalic acid as their only treatment for varroa?, in a perfect world to treat every day for a complete brood cycle would seem to be the way.

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Curious George    119
I wonder how many time a week people use oxalic acid as their only treatment for varroa?, in a perfect world to treat every day for a complete brood cycle would seem to be the way.

 

I imagine there would come a point where the hive would collapse and abandon the location as the constant flume of oxalic would severely interfere with their pheromones. Where this point is though I'm not sure - every day / second day / five days?

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