Petition to ban neonics worldwide

Discussion in 'Bees in the Media' started by Genaya, Mar 21, 2017 at 07:26.

  1. Genaya

    Genaya Egg Beginner

    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Tamahere, Waikato
    Ratings:
    +35 / -0
    For decades, agro-chemical corporations likeBayer have been trying to convince us that we need bee-killing neonicotinoids, and that humans simply can’t feed ourselves without them. A scathing UN report just called that story a complete “myth.”

    This report on pesticides is a bombshell. Its expert authors say in no uncertain terms: the “myth” that humans need any pesticides -- not just neonics -- to feed the world is being spread by the “unethical” practices of global corporations who consistently deny the science showing the harms of using these toxins to grow our food.

    We don't need neonics to feed us. It's time for a global ban.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 21, 2017 at 10:09
  2. Alastair

    Alastair Guard Bee Donor 2016 Semi Commercial Platinum Donor '17

    Messages:
    3,759
    Location:
    Auckland North Shore
    Ratings:
    +5,563 / -1
    After years of saying that neonics were killing the bees in Europe, they finally got neonicitinoids banned in some European countries around 2 years ago. There has been no increase in bee numbers since. Clearly they were using fake science.
     
  3. Alastair

    Alastair Guard Bee Donor 2016 Semi Commercial Platinum Donor '17

    Messages:
    3,759
    Location:
    Auckland North Shore
    Ratings:
    +5,563 / -1
    The linked article says that it is a myth that we need insecticides to feed the world. It is not a myth, this is more fake science. Since insecticide use became widespread, agriculture has in places turned to huge monocultures and food production of the world has increased massively. With no natural predators, and improved medical care, the human population has also increased massively, to meet food supply. Take away insecticides there would be mass starvation.

    The answer is less people. In my opinion the world has FAR too many people. If the world population was reduced to say, 5 million, there would be plenty natural resources to go around, and huge areas could be returned to the use of wild animals.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Top Answer Top Answer x 1
  4. kaihoka

    kaihoka Guard Bee Donor 2016 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    1,704
    Location:
    whanganui inlet. South island
    Ratings:
    +1,294 / -3
    If you follow your logic we should ban insecticides cause there would be a mass cull of the population.
    I do agree that humans are so far down the path they have chosen to go to feed themselves that a uturn now would be catastrophic .
    But do you think this path is sustainable for the long term .
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. Alastair

    Alastair Guard Bee Donor 2016 Semi Commercial Platinum Donor '17

    Messages:
    3,759
    Location:
    Auckland North Shore
    Ratings:
    +5,563 / -1
    You have my logic correct. A smaller human population can, and has, existed without insecticides.

    Do I think our path is sustainable for the long term? No. How can anyone think it is sustainable long term? The planet we live on is so big. The human population just keeps on growing. There is only so much room, we cannot indefinately grow the population. If we do not reduce population voluntarily, catastrophies plagues starvation pollution and warfare over resources will do it for us like it or not.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Bron

    Bron Guard Bee Commercial

    Messages:
    2,137
    Location:
    Gisborne
    Ratings:
    +2,844 / -0
    Along the same lines. Gizzy now has a problem with keeping bees thriving on the flats and it's been given its own name "Gisborne Flats Disease".

    The use of pesticides, herbicides on brassicas, lettuces, sweet corn, maize, citrus, kiwi fruit, apples and grapes (to name a few) must be at an all time high.

    In the last five years or so we have seen the fences removed from cropping paddocks the crops pretty well go to the very edge of the road. The machinery seems to be able to get closer to the fences that remain. There are very few hedges left, only shelter belts that offer little to no forage for bees anyway.

    After a couple of cases a few years back of poisoning of hives we no longer keep bees on the flats, the risks are just too high.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Kiwifruiter

    Kiwifruiter Guard Bee Semi Commercial

    Messages:
    2,407
    Location:
    Napier
    Ratings:
    +1,820 / -6
  8. AdamD

    AdamD Pupa International Beekeeper

    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Eastern England
    Ratings:
    +348 / -0
    I agree with the need for less people - although I don't propose to starve them by reducing food. Man should be able to think of a better way! (My old maths teacher suggested two house bricks to curb the enthusiasm of schoolboys .....)

    Honeybees in the UK have done very well on neonic treated OSR (Canola) and beekeepers will take their bees TO OSR as bees do so well on them. Bring on the Rape, we say! So neonics are not as bad as some would suppose. I do have concerns about other bees and insects. After all neonics are insecticides and they are supposed to kill insects so we can have so much food that we waste a good proportion of it! Are they better or worse than anything else on the market that farmers can use? No one has said, it seems. We don't appear to have mass poisonings of honeybees in the UK as was reported 20 or more years ago before neonics were used. I would love the world to be nasty-chemical free. I am not convinced that it's an option.
     
  9. yesbut

    yesbut Field Bee Donor 2015 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    6,457
    Location:
    X 0786
    Ratings:
    +7,866 / -3
    I prefer fewer people actually. It's what I was taught, and sounds better to.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  10. kaihoka

    kaihoka Guard Bee Donor 2016 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    1,704
    Location:
    whanganui inlet. South island
    Ratings:
    +1,294 / -3
    As much as I may bitch about our environment here I have to say that I do not have to deal with problems created by human behaviour.
    Nature is still winning here and effectively drives most people out .
    I do not know how I have lasted 40 yrs and what that says about me, it may not be flattering .
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
  11. kaihoka

    kaihoka Guard Bee Donor 2016 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    1,704
    Location:
    whanganui inlet. South island
    Ratings:
    +1,294 / -3
    That's really sad.
    In Europe they have stopped spraying roadsides I think and are starting to value wildness
     
  12. yesbut

    yesbut Field Bee Donor 2015 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    6,457
    Location:
    X 0786
    Ratings:
    +7,866 / -3
    Well I can tell you if considering moving over here you have to be careful the traffic is starting to get horrendous in places.
     
  13. kaihoka

    kaihoka Guard Bee Donor 2016 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    1,704
    Location:
    whanganui inlet. South island
    Ratings:
    +1,294 / -3
    The road at home is pretty busy these days.
    Lots of giant motor homes , the drivers hit the gravel, freak out and drive at 10 klms an hour in the middle of the road till they can find a safe place to turn round.
     
    • Funny Funny x 4
  14. Philbee

    Philbee Guard Bee Donor 2016 Commercial

    Messages:
    2,963
    Location:
    Taupo
    Ratings:
    +2,839 / -14
    Can you drink the stream water without risk of Giardia?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Philbee

    Philbee Guard Bee Donor 2016 Commercial

    Messages:
    2,963
    Location:
    Taupo
    Ratings:
    +2,839 / -14
    The biggest rat will eat the rest
     
  16. kaihoka

    kaihoka Guard Bee Donor 2016 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    1,704
    Location:
    whanganui inlet. South island
    Ratings:
    +1,294 / -3
    Where does Giardia come from.
    There are wild pigs sometimes. Maybe deer but no possums.
    People run water from the creeks into their water tanks
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Philbee

    Philbee Guard Bee Donor 2016 Commercial

    Messages:
    2,963
    Location:
    Taupo
    Ratings:
    +2,839 / -14
    Giardia comes from tourists I think.
    Then animals can spread it but I may be wrong.
     
  18. kaihoka

    kaihoka Guard Bee Donor 2016 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    1,704
    Location:
    whanganui inlet. South island
    Ratings:
    +1,294 / -3
    No tourists in hills here, only pig hunters and dope growers.
    It's not Bush here , it's jungle
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  19. AdamD

    AdamD Pupa International Beekeeper

    Messages:
    354
    Location:
    Eastern England
    Ratings:
    +348 / -0
    Well, if you insist! :)
     
  20. yesbut

    yesbut Field Bee Donor 2015 Hobbyist

    Messages:
    6,457
    Location:
    X 0786
    Ratings:
    +7,866 / -3
    Giardia is a bit like HSE, over blown. I've wandered all over Abel Tasman many times and made a point of guzzling the nearest water as required, never a problem. I read a report once that claimed about half the population of NZ were passive carriers
    of the bug.
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page

Loading...