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Found 13 results

  1. View Offer Queens, NUCs & Beehives! ITALIAN QUEENS - Available October 2018 This auction is for 20 Mated Queens Our Mated Queens are $75.00 each (exc GST) This totals $1,725.00 including GST for 20 Check out our website for orders of different quantities. Mated Queens $75.00 each excluding GST Virgin Queens $16.00 each excluding GST All of our Mated Queens have been checked for their laying patterns and have been seen to have either mature larvae or capped brood before we harvest her. Our stock of Mated Queens is strictly limited, so please advise us of your requirements as soon as you can to limit disappointment Our Mated Queen Bees are produced to the highest standard and comply to a seven point quality assurance check prior to caging & dispatch. Beaut Bees Queens are bred from carefully selected breeder Queens and drone hives. Queens are sent in mailing cages with nurse bees via overnight courier; with expected delivery the morning after dispatch (with exception of some rural locations).The Queen is well cared for by her attendants and will travel with candy to ensure she stays well in transit.Virgin Queens will mate anytime from approximately day 4 to day 16 of her life. Good weather, warm temperatures and drone availability will be the contributing factors related to her mating success. Full Depth Beehive 10-99 $635.00 each Full Depth Beehives 100+ $600.00 each 7 frame NUCs 10-99 $315.00 each 7 frame NUCs 100+ $295.00 each Hives have been treated for varroa – Autumn treatment with Bayvarol and Organic treatment has been applied during the Winter. Hives are being cared for by our experienced beekeeping team with DECA qualifications. Hives are strong and bees are wintering well. Hives are on great wintering blocks with an abundance of good winter food available. Check out our website for more information. Registration: A7597 Price $1,725.00 Submitter Beautbees Submitted 08/09/18 Category Commercial Bees & Hives For Sale
  2. ITALIAN QUEENS - Available October 2018 This auction is for 20 Mated Queens Our Mated Queens are $75.00 each (exc GST) This totals $1,725.00 including GST for 20 Check out our website for orders of different quantities. Mated Queens $75.00 each excluding GST Virgin Queens $16.00 each excluding GST All of our Mated Queens have been checked for their laying patterns and have been seen to have either mature larvae or capped brood before we harvest her. Our stock of Mated Queens is strictly limited, so please advise us of your requirements as soon as you can to limit disappointment Our Mated Queen Bees are produced to the highest standard and comply to a seven point quality assurance check prior to caging & dispatch. Beaut Bees Queens are bred from carefully selected breeder Queens and drone hives. Queens are sent in mailing cages with nurse bees via overnight courier; with expected delivery the morning after dispatch (with exception of some rural locations).The Queen is well cared for by her attendants and will travel with candy to ensure she stays well in transit.Virgin Queens will mate anytime from approximately day 4 to day 16 of her life. Good weather, warm temperatures and drone availability will be the contributing factors related to her mating success. Full Depth Beehive 10-99 $635.00 each Full Depth Beehives 100+ $600.00 each 7 frame NUCs 10-99 $315.00 each 7 frame NUCs 100+ $295.00 each Hives have been treated for varroa – Autumn treatment with Bayvarol and Organic treatment has been applied during the Winter. Hives are being cared for by our experienced beekeeping team with DECA qualifications. Hives are strong and bees are wintering well. Hives are on great wintering blocks with an abundance of good winter food available. Check out our website for more information. Registration: A7597
  3. Out of a larger batch of 2018 queens which were produced from my grafts and successfully open mated, two of them were deemed unfit by their respective nucs and they produced a couple of supercedure cells in each. One of these queens however is bursting with eggs and there’s a healthy pattern. Lots of eggs larvae and capped brood. Why would they supercede her? I’ve read people say leave them to it, but I’m thibking to myself.. hey why not try get all of these supercedure cells into mating nucs and see what happens?!!
  4. Hi beeks, one of my hives is much stronger than the other hive. Both are one box hives, which were transplanted from two 5 frame nucs 3 weeks ago. The weaker hive may have starved a bit lately, or have a lame Queen as there’s almost no stores, way less bees, more drone brood, and any capped worker brood is toward one side, away from the centre. I have eyeballed her yesterday though along with some new eggs. The strong hive is ready for another box, with heaps of stores of nectar and pollen, lots of neat worker brood filling up frames. How can they be at such different stages even though they’re located beside each other? Robbing? Better / worse queen? I’ve begun feeding syrup this weekend, so based on how things look next weekend I may have to take action (replace weaker queen / add frame of capped brood from other hive). Any advice much appreciated. I believe both queens are last autumns, over wintered. P.S. I’ll behaving myself now on the forum
  5. I have just watched my new queen return from a mating flight. The hive swarmed on Oct 9th (captured and put in my TBH). That afternoon, I inspected the hive and removed 7 capped queen cells, and couldn't find the original yellow marked queen. I left the largest capped cell, which I assumed, correctly, was due to emerge any day. Today I noticed increased activity, and watched it for a while, then thought to get the GoPro and film it. I had no idea what was happening. Suddenly I noticed the queen, and zoomed in on her wandering around outside. She was walking around for 70 secs, and I got it all on video, including her flying in and landing, right up to when she disappeared inside. Here are some pics. Queen flying into photo... Queen landing... Queen walked around for about 1 minute... Queen enters back into the hive...
  6. Great that we finally had a warm day in Christchurch that I could use for spring inspection. What a surprise. Home Hive (1) is 3 x3/4, full of stores and is packed out with pollen in about 5 frames. The girls have been hard at work all winter. No signs of PMS. And no AFB. But no eggs, capped brood. And the occasional dead unemerged bee. Absolutely no sign of AFB, and I even double checked with the test kit. No queen to be seen, but there was one supercedure cell. About 8 frames of bees across two levels. Second apiary. This hive was robbed by the home hive last year and moved. Its going gang busters, they have an early flow there is new nectar in the frames. 8 frames of good brood and 6 frames of eggs. The queen was new last year and going strong is seems. So will soon be adding space as part of swam management. My plan; Bring some eggs/larva/brood across from Hive 2 to 1. But my question is should I do a "split" style move and bring nurse bees too and then merge the transported bees with the existing hive? Or just bring bee free frames and drop them in? I'm worried hive 1 doesn't have enough bees to look after them if I bring no nurses. Thoughts?
  7. I just signed the petition "Petition WORKSAFE NZ to enforce the laws protecting bees" and wanted to see if you could help by adding your name. Our goal is to reach 200 signatures and we need more support. You can read more and sign the petition here: Thanks! Deborah
  8. I have one laying worker hive and I am getting queens soon. Is it possible to make Nucs with bees from this laying worker hive and these Queens?
  9. I had a hive that has been queenless for a about two weeks (no brood...no laying worker... no sign of a newly mated queen). I had an old queen and just put her into the hive without cage yesterday. Is there a chance for her. Or should I have put her in a cage for safety first. They did not seem to attack her. Any experience with these situations?
  10. If I have a strong hive that I want to split early in Spring, could applying Thymovar treatments now affect how a newly introduced queen is accepted when I do the split?
  11. Just want to check if my thinking and strategy is correct: Did a thorough inspection on both my hives over the weekend. Loads of honey, so all good on the winter-food front. In one of the hives I could not find any eggs or a queen. On three of the frames there were multiple queen cells in the middle of the frames. But all the queen cells were chewed open. So my conclusion is that something happened to the original queen and girls made multiple emergency queen cells to improve their odds. One of the cells hatched and took action against the unhatched queens. I could not see a queen though, but I suspect that she is small and skinny, so it will probably be more difficult to find her. I still have a couple of drones in my hives, so there must be some more around to mate with the new queen. My thinking is that the best strategy is to just let them be for the next two weeks and hopefully when I look again I would see some eggs from a newly mated queen. Is this the correct approach?
  12. Futhermore, A queen cell supplier could do very well if they had a pool of carry cells for loan. The carrycells could have their own prepaid freight return cartoon. There are plans on this site for very inexpensive cell transporters. $100 That's a free tip
  13. Two weeks ago I inspected a hive that started as a bought nuc that I received end of December, and is now two 3/4 boxes strong (see pics at the end of this post). During the inspection at the time I could not find the queen, but I a saw quite a lot of brud in various stages. I've gone back last weekend and just a quick inspection on 2 frames and saw that most of the brud have been capped - unfortunately I did not think to do a more thorough inspection and look for eggs. It bugged me the whole week. Today I did a thorough inspection. No queen. Lots of empty cells. No eggs. Lots of honey and pollen being stored in the cells where I expected to see brud. Saw one cell that looked like an emergency Queen cell, but could not see any larva inside, although there was some jelly at the bottom of the cell. There is also another cell at the bottom of a frame but I thought that would only be created if they wanted to swarm (see pics). I moved one frame of brud/eggs from my other hive to the queenless hive. The bees themselves were very quiet and peaceful - not aggressive and they did not seem to have a worry in the world. I will really appreciate advice and opinions on the best way forward. The options I think I have: 1) Buy and introduce a new queen, if it possible to get one fairly quickly. 2) Combine a mixed Italian/Carnolian swarm that I caught mid January, that is now about 7 frames strong with the Queenless hive. 3) Leave the queenless hive to make an emergency queen. At the moment I am leaning towards option 2, thinking that it would be better to bump the queenless hive's numbers up by joining the hive and swarm. It will also mean that I probably do not need to feed the swarm during winter since the queenless hive already have about 7-8 frames of honey in it (especially now that the bees seem to only store honey since they do not have new brud to raise). Thanks in advance for your comments and advice!
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