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Shane

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About Shane

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    Pupa

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  • Beekeeping Experience
    Commercial Beekeeper

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    kaitaia

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  1. Have a commercial of three generations up north here who went down with one sting,,, I will say semi:) mature of age:) had to go throu the injection thing. When i have a bad reaction some american or canadian doc i had to see said keep the stings to a minimum of three a day,,, anymore were far to much, She said it works the opposite to what we think when it comes to the immunity thing with the bigger hits. Its the neck areas i am careful of, usually use a neck sleeve when i dont use a veil it seems to be one of the bad spots to go down.
  2. Damned if ya do, Damned if ya don"t!!
  3. by the drum!??? rewarewa, kamahi $10 or its just not worth doing it, any native bush honey really one would hope for $10. Kanuka not sure i kept mine for potting but $15 would be my thoughts ,, and 5npa Manuka $22 if it passes the mpi garbage (mono), if it doesn't, one would hope its somewhere close.
  4. In spring i was getting 1800-2500 across the board,, autumn around a few hundred or less,,,,,,,,,, i would be very happy with 150. still doesn't mean you will not get a ferment up happening, but highly unlikely if your moisture is ok. Its another one of those tests to give you and idea why sometimes drums ferment but really tells you nothing. Interesting but!
  5. Regarding Ecrotek's reply to my post,,, Its been a while since i have bought waxed frames from you guys,, would have been the first stuff you lot ever supplied or maybe it was still Beetek, before the two company's merged "all them years ago". But anyway it was a bit scratchy of what I would call a reasonable coating (it was what it was back then i guess) Since then when I needed such(in emergency's or been lazy) waxed frames were never in stock so I only know what I have experienced. Saying that all my plastic has been through Beetek or Ecrotek, great company without a doubt. The needed wax coating thickness seems very seasonal to me with plastic so Ecrotek dont take it personal, theres really no right amount on bad flows(or maybe bad beekeepers:) A fine coat and bad season the plastic might as well have nothing on it.. meaning a very scratchy draw. Extra thick coatings seems to help in this somewhat(bees will move wax to where its needed. This is one of the reasons why i have turned off wood & wax foundation, a bad seasons one will find the bees steal whole areas of foundation from the outer edges along the top, bottom, and all corners leaving anything from small to massive gaps between the drawn comb and wood, i presume this was done to cap brood or help draw comb elsewhere when in need. At least with plastic one can force comb draw where the wax has been stripped in the corners in reasonable flows to a 100% drawn comb, not so can be said for holey wood&foundation for some reason,, just my experience
  6. i use both, about half and half in the brood box and cannot wait to dump all thats wood. I only dip my frames these days,, I use a 50l keg with top cut out filled with water and gas fired(not sure of temp, i feel my way on that one but not simmer or boil, thats to hot) throw pieces of wax in to make a skim on top water (thicker the skim thicker the coat) dip frame as the pieces of wax melt only halfway and quickly re-dip other end(stops warping issues doing each half separately) put in box as ya go so frames stay straight, sometimes you might get a warpy one from double dipping but slotted in the box sorts that. faster then any kind of brushing. i use both, about half and half in the brood box and cannot wait to dump all thats wood. I only dip my frames these days,, I use a 50l keg with top cut out filled with water and gas fired(not sure of temp, i feel my way on that one but not simmer or boil, thats to hot) throw pieces of wax in to make a skim on top water (thicker the skim thicker the coat) dip frame as the pieces of wax melt only halfway and quickly re-dip other end(stops warping issues doing each half separately) put in box as ya go so frames stay straight, sometimes you might get a warpy one from double dipping but slotted in the box sorts that. faster then any kind of brushing. buying the pre-waxed has always been disappointing.
  7. Got an email from "New Zealand Beekeeping Incorporated" the day before (Whangarei) about the meetings of APINZ over the country. I have no idea how these people got my address other then the MPI list. But glad I got it. I was already going to the MPI thingy anyway so it worked out. And I'm seriously against paying $86 a drum to receive ok mags. As a small time operator I just see another body clipping the ticket and a (supposedly body for beekeepers) seriously missing the post of the troubles the industry up north is facing at the moment.. little cheeky none of the APINZ members didnt go to the MPI meeting I thought. Northern beekeepers had some serious concerns which were given in the API meeting over the new MPI standards (yeah a side thing to what the meeting was about but all I saw was disinterest from a body that supposedly wants to have my back my money my business to go forward (or do they) they really didnt get it(maybe) that many smaller operators might not be around to be taxed in the near future. It was nice to see the bigger guys voicing concerns for the smaller operators. The MPI meeting was mentioned by unsure who in the APINZ thingy but hey I heard it plainly so I guess their ears were on some auto self editing program who knows. Rather interesting day tho,, I think the most said phrase of the meeting was "ya still not listening"
  8. interesting Tristen, man full of info,,, actually i was thinking because we seal our drums buckets whatever this in itself may help this process, allowing yeast or bacteria to go through the drum faster,, i've wondered if it wasnt under pressure would the honey go foamy all the way through as i saw in the bucket. that bucket i brought home, i was treating it like a bomb, every bump in the road:) but actually it wasnt to bad to pull apart, didnt loose to much. but drums must be a very diff story. next time i will check the ph, if theres a next time..
  9. had such happen a season or two ago, manuka rewarewa around 7npa 18percent water, i was the only one it happened to that year. you will need to have the honey pasteurized real quick, longer you leave it the more you will loose i guess. sold mine on after depressurizing. at that time i was lucky, honey was flying out the door so it was sold as what 7npa was worth bar less the honey from depressurizing. buyer didnt seem to worry, they were informed. i take it most honeys are pasteurized by these bulk buyers then?? i had a 20 liter bucket overrun to play with. took it home, put it on the stove in my brewing kettle and pasteurized (hour at a certain temp while ya keep mixing) it was really strange stuff, all very foamy when it came out of the expanded bucket like a weird cake mix, no honey syrup in it in a sense. once pasteurized and cooled the foam came to 4-5 inch's on top, all under the foam the honey was normal as can be. this never played up again, the foamy stuff was put aside and seemed very eatable and still is today as with the honey i drained off it. its a yeast of cause, from what i learnt no one has looked into this big time to define what yeast it is or why it happens.
  10. as in analytica stuffing up, highly unlikely,, so maybe its honeydew at its purest? bees cannot hit a flower without taking some pollen on board eventually. these new tests haven't taken into account of honeydew so i'm told,, so maybe..
  11. what are you exactly asking? pretty broad question.. down 30 percent in general in the drum due to slow start & possibly 10 percent eat back, down a good 60 percent in the hive for wintering(but that was due to mite issues) otherwise without mite issues it would have been much the same as last season, yields were just different by what flower was giving. seems i did better then most here locally,,, few km south kaitaia
  12. Yeah i am with you there Dean,, i'm gutted with how all this has gone down, this will effect the smaller operator massively,,, at least i am happy all the MPI lot haven't lost any sleep over salary problems, no foreclosures or just seriously bad credit issues. And now it seems my drums could possibly sit into our next coming spring. just imagine if NZ had i fantastic flow this last season, all those drums sitting(now that would have changed the price of honey dramatically) This whole thing could have been dealt with a whole lot better,, really its :crap: basically. the feedback or info given by MPI is appalling, why as a beekeeper should i have to feel my way through this mess they have served up, at my expense(having no idea what i should test for a pass) even a overall release of their findings (tests) would be seriously useful to all. To think i have got more info off this thread then those morons. Really the commercial beek industry should of had a better say in this,,,, not happy!!
  13. hmmm i havent noticed the manuka blight been much of a prob to the manuka tree, its more beneficial i have noticed in those dry rancid areas helping to funnel rain water to its roots, such is a very noticeable watch, and making my life a misery when i'm wanting a fire in the rain or wet. The kanuka is whats seriously noticeable this season, and it seems to be only certain areas. i have never seen it do this before where i live,,,, trouble is i have only become one of those extravagant flower watchers since my intro into bees, but i'm sure i would have noticed this before. the trees look seriously drought stricken is the best way to explain it. we do have blights that are connected to other native flora that i guess are natural, so maybe this is nothing new but just another way to stop particular a species taking over, which Kanuka is good at.
  14. I think I mentioned last year that some of the kanuka was looking sick, and either flowered very, very lightly or not at all. This year it just looks dead or dying in some areas, we went through Otoko and Matawai today, it's looking very sad. your post caught my eye @Bron, i have to agree,, i said this to a fellow bee keeper the other week in the Kaitaia region how it looked to be kinda dying in some places, mainly when its flowering. coming down to Auckland the other day, it looked fine in colour and flower compared to home. so yes i was feeling apprehensive on my return before i even saw your post. i have not noticed any beetles or bugs but will be having a closer look when i get back..
  15. spring talk has me interested here Roy. just wondering if you or why you didnt look at these things "Sumo Springs" SumoSprings - Available Now! - 4WD Solutions 'BEST GEAR - RIGHT PLACE' for all your 4X4 Products, Parts and Servicing ,, sounds like a better idea then airbags to me,, none breakable "ever". any thoughts anyone?
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