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tudor

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Posts posted by tudor


  1. Back to basics.

    The first step is to prevent the hive entering the "We are going to swarm" mode

    Then an intervention such as an Artificial Swarm if they are in swarming mode.

     

    Or they will swarm.

     

    Look up how to do it my "Easy Bee Keeping for Hobbyists in NZ".

     


  2. It really depends on the point of view.  I have always been a hobby BK and used one size (3/4),  don't use queen excluder, and freely use boxes anywhere which have had brood.  Honey has lots of pollen in it, and is full of flavour, and lots of bits of wax especially if it contains kanuka - it needs "tickling" to get the honey out of the comb.  And, obviously, no active brood in the cells when considered for extraction. It is strained and not filtered, and in high demand with people who like really tasty honey.  But only a couple of hundred kg's per year, completely different view point!

     

    • Like 4

  3. Harsh  ?  That's the Socratic teaching method I have used for many years to help produce effective doctors.

    "The oldest, and still the most powerful, teaching tactic for fostering critical thinking is Socratic teaching. In Socratic teaching we focus on giving students questions, not answers. We model an inquiring, probing mind by continually probing into the subject with questions. Fortunately, the abilities we gain by focusing on the elements of reasoning in a disciplined and self-assessing way, and the logical relationships that result from such disciplined thought, prepare us for Socratic questioning."

    And producing good, inquiring bee keepers as well.

     

     


  4. 36 minutes ago, yesbut said:

    So does this study indicate some benefit when taken orally by rats ?

    Yes - honey does give a significant benefit, but there is no proof that manuka honey is any better than another honey.  More work needed.

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1

  5. 6 hours ago, yesbut said:

    I apologise if this link to a study of manuka's effectiveness for gastric ulcers has been thrashed over before. Perhaps @tudor you could confirm my thought that the conclusion relates to what is actually a topical application of honey to a rat's exposed internal organ ?  I can't quite figure it out. 

     

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5307292/

     

     

     

     

    The acid is injected into the wall of the stomach, then it's soaked in saline and the abdomen closed up. 

    The "agents" are then introduced down the throat by gavage which is "the administration of food or drugs by force, especially to an animal, typically through a tube leading down the throat to the stomach" (Wikipedia).

     


  6. 49 minutes ago, Adam Boot said:

    When the consumer buys Manuka they have made a choice based upon what they have read, heard, witnessed and believe that is is more than just honey but is of benefit to them. For this reason the consumer pays the much higher price. It is not for the taste. Anyone making a purchase should be treated with respect and be sold the product they think/believe they are buying. To have one clearly higher standard for export product and for the domestic consumer to be largely unaware of the difference is quite wrong. It is unfair to the consumer and dangerous to the industry long term. Product on the shelf in NZ is bought and sent to friends and family over seas it is also purchased by tourist and taken or sent overseas. In my opinion it is just a matter of time before there is another journalistic, media beat up over varying quality and confusion over true to label. 

    UMF grading is a clear indicator that the product has met MPI Manuka honey science definition (export standard). While dual standards remain in place this is a mark that the consumer can rely upon. Unfortunately the consumer is probably also unaware of this? 

     

    Adam

    "Anyone making a purchase ... the product they think/believe they are buying" is what it is all about.  Misinformation about the benefits has been very successfully used, and reminds me about the measles epidemic which is with us now, partly due to misinformation about the dangers of immunization with MMR.  The link to autism has been shown to be fraudulent and the doctor involved struck off, but it is still seen as a risk and contributes to reduction of "herd immunity".  So with the benefits of oral manuka honey, consumers have been told so often about how good it is for health - it is not, but it's ridiculously good for the folding notes of people along the chain from the manuka trees to the shelf.

    Journalistic beat ups sometimes reveal the truth.

    • Like 2

  7. It's about time to raise the point again that all the MPI standards and mumbo jumbo may have an effect on the quality of medicinal honey, but have no effect at all on honey taken by mouth.  Certainly, keep our non-medicinal honeys free of adulteration with non-honey compounds, but they are all just honey, and people buy them because they are nice to eat.  True advertising should say "buy and eat our honey because it tastes and smells so nice, and that's the only reason".

    • Like 2
    • Agree 5

  8. This climber is still in flower in Dunedin in July, and a few days ago was covered with bees when they were out.

    Could it be a clematis, and I hope not Old Man's Beard.

    Thanks for help.

    Tudor.

    clematis-20190722-small.jpg


  9. On 7/05/2019 at 9:48 PM, nikki watts said:

    Ours have been broodless for about 3 weeks. Some are starting to lay again but most aren’t. 

    Hive populations are dropping fast so I hope the queens get a wriggle on soon. Hives with heaps of stores are as broodless and the ones needing a feed. 

    I would be surprised if the bee population in a healthy hive is diving because the bees should be winter bees by now.  And they are expected to live for some months.  It should be no problem if there is little or no brood, as the queen will start laying again quite soon.

     


  10. www.dave-cushman.net/bee/eke.html

     

    Rational Eke. Eke. A spacer that gives extra height in a hive. In beekeeping terms an "Eke" is simply a spacer that goes between, over or under hive parts to create extra space for a number of reasons. Ekes are very versatile and quite interesting bits of kit.

    • Thanks 1

  11. Some people - and why the queen lays lower down when the bees store honey in the upper boxes.

    And the honey with some pollen in it is complex and delicious ...  for hobby bee keepers.

    • Like 1

  12. Yes, a good source of amusement was to go to the Blue pools on the Haast road and put on a good layer of DEET and walk in the few hundred meters to look into the pools and see the big trout cruising - and then watch the sand flies hold their fire until the tourists were as far as possible from their cars, and then give them both barrels !  And  watch them trying to cross the swing bridge en masse.  Ah, those were the days.  :14_relaxed:

    • Like 2
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