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Thomas Clow

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About Thomas Clow

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    Commercial Beekeeper

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  1. Yes it was started, it's sole purpose was exposure to as many people as possible so no one was left unaware, the meetings were held and open conversation was held at those meetings. If you want to talk to the man, the door is open to do so.
  2. If people want more information please email Bruce, he will happily answer questions. bruce@ceracell.co.nz He is not going to enter into a debate in this forum, he has better things to do with his time then debate openly on a forum, so if you are looking for answers please email him and he will do his best to answer your questions. We will be at the conference at Rotorua so come see us, I and Bruce will be there, he will gladly talk to you about the co-op there.
  3. We want people who are truly interested to contact bruce personally to get the forms to submit donations. please email bruce, bruce@ceracell.co.nz if you wish to contrbute or ask him personal direct questions in relation to the co-op We were made aware of an interested party start the give a little page. I don't see an issue with a member taking initiative to help the co-op at this stage. Michael sage is a family friend, the money is not going to be touched by the advisors....that comment is rediculous. What are the larger companies offering you? If they offerred you anything we wouldnt be in this situation in the first place. If you need to repair your car, who do you go to? When you don't have the answers to a question you go looking for someone who does. Everyone needs someones help to deal with situations that you personally have not dealt with. That is said with business as well. Mr Sage has consulted on Co-ops before and knows the challenges. So we need his advice on how in certain areas to best move forward. Where are the experts. What business experts know the beekeeping industry better than Bruce? Lecturer, he has an MBA and has been runnning businesses for more than 20 years. I don't know anyone better or morally sound than Bruce to start this venture. I think people don't understand the situation. No one knows the emails we are getting from beekeepers who are in serious hardship, people are suffering and something needs to be done. Saying a market correction is just life, this is unacceptable.
  4. Proposed New Zealand Honey Producers’ Co-op Where We Are At You may or may not know, there is a grass-roots movement underway to set up a honey producers’ co-operative in New Zealand. As the nexus of the movement, I thought I would let the wider beekeeping community know a little bit about what is happening, where we are up to, and see if you might be interested in joining the movement or maybe just helping in some tangible way. Background At Ceracell Beekeeping Supplies we are in regular contact with lots of beekeepers. Since about the middle of last year we have been getting feedback that things were not as rosy in the industry as the public believed. The messages of unhappiness, growing into despair, increased until in February this year it was very clear that many of our customers were really struggling financially. The word was that many had not sold any non-manuka honey last season, and couldn’t sell any this season as well at any price. And it wasn’t just new beekeepers feeling the financial pressure. Third generation beekeeping businesses were reporting that their banks which carried them through last year and this year were balking at extending overdrafts. The banks rightly were asking the question, that if you can’t sell your produce for two years in a row, why will it change for the coming season? At Ceracell we advertise that we are here to “help beekeepers”. Well it became pretty clear that right now “helping beekeepers” meant doing more than just selling them stuff. In April, I organised a series of meetings throughout New Zealand with the objective of finding out if the problem was nationwide, and what could be done about it. It is clear that the problem is nationwide. The problem in its most basic description came about because of the decade long frenzy surrounding manuka honey and the skyrocketing prices it was getting. Until MPI brought in the manuka honey definition, much non-manuka honey was being blended into manuka to increase volumes of that valuable specialist honey. As a result, the price of non-manuka honey got dragged up, and the inherent value of those other beautiful New Zealand honey varieties got ignored. So now blending has stopped and because there has been a decade of no significant marketing overseas of non-manuka varieties, at best honey producers can get international bulk honey prices, if it can be sold at all. But what to do about it? In talking to beekeepers, the word “co-op” kept popping up. “If only we had a co-op that could find overseas markets and build value-added brands, things would be better. At least we would know our honey would be bought. As it is, our usual private honey buyer won’t or can’t buy our honey.” At the meetings in which I met with about 300 people, there was a genuine desire to work together and help each other. The co-operative model which is widely used in New Zealand in the primary produce sector seemed to fill the criteria, so that was the starting point. I got some help from Michael Sage, a partner in the law firm, Simpson Grierson, who has expertise in co-ops. He brought on board a co-op experienced CA from the accounting firm, PwC, Justin Liddell. John Bell, a former tutor at Taratahi College and former lecturer in marketing at the University of Otago has provided valuable advice as well. What Is Happening Now? During and shortly after running the nationwide meetings I asked for people to make a verbal commitment to starting a journey towards establishing a honey producers’ co-op or some other model that would provide these primary benefits: 1. Build an organisation based on the ethics and morality of helping each other. 2. Commit to purchase the member’s honey in good years and bad years. 3. Build brands and market the honey overseas. 4. Return the added-value proceeds to the producer firstly through better gate prices and finally through dividends. 5. Provide price guidance forecasts so the producer can start their season with some idea of what they will receive for their produce at the end of the season. There are many other benefits that a co-op can provide members, but these are the main ones that beekeepers wanted from their co-op. We received that commitment from over 280 beekeepers and beekeeping businesses that together run over 113,000 beehives. The conundrum is that building a business that can do the above would take a lot of money, and most of the people drawn to the idea are currently in difficult financial circumstances. So what to do? After a very in-depth and to the point meeting with our advisors, we came up with a plan. Step one was to seek donations to set-up a trust. The trust would be instructed to begin the detailed analysis of the business environment and the international honey market with a primary objective of creating a prospectus to put to potential members. The trust, with the help of beekeepers on a steering committee would begin building the co-op, that is, the constitution and rules of operation for when it would be incorporated as a co-operative company. The trust would also prepare a cogent application to ask the Government for significant funding to carry the business for a number of years until the members were financial enough to carry it themselves. Based on their extensive experience Michael and Justin felt that the very minimum that the trust would need to do these things, was $100,000. They also believed that a firm deadline to reach that goal should be set, because letting the issue drag on for many weeks without resolution would in fact cause the momentum that has been built with the goodwill shown by so many, to be lost. So on 27 May I forwarded the documents provided by Michael, asking for donations from the 280 beekeeping businesses, looking for a total of $100,000 by 5 pm on 21 June 2019. Those willing to help will deposit their donation directly into the Simpson Grierson solicitor’s trust account. If the total isn’t reached by the deadline, all the money donated will be returned to the givers. If and when the $100,000 is reached, the trust will be set up and we will start. This would not necessarily mean a co-op would be established, as it would be necessary that significant other money would be needed, but the first hurdle would have been overcome. Progress Yes progress is sure and steady, and the desire for the co-op is as strong as ever. Many have donated and some have donated a lot of money. Will we reach the target? I think it is a 50:50 call. I do know that some beekeepers who desperately want a co-op are in such difficult financial circumstances that they truly cannot give anything. Most of those that have given to date have given more on an individual basis than I would have thought possible. Others have said they will be donating, but the finances are so tight that the timing of dispensing cash is critical for them. Whether they can free it up by the deadline, time will tell. You Can Help The reason I am writing to the wider community of beekeepers is because these beekeepers, these people with children, and employees, need this co-op. And I think the beekeeping industry needs this co-op. On the weekend I had a chance to talk with a few of the 280, and I want to share with you an insight that Karl gave me. He said the beekeeping industry will end up like the fishing industry if we don’t do something. The fishing industry is now dominated by a few large New Zealand corporates and overseas corporates who own most of the quota. The small commercial fisherman has been pushed out of the industry. If these small to medium sized commercial beekeepers—family based beekeeping businesses—are allowed to fail, the beekeeping industry in four or five years will look like the fishing industry. The opportunity for someone to start-up a one-person or two-person operation will be gone. But with a co-op designed to be the path-to-market for the smaller operator that opportunity will always be there. Big money doesn’t have to drive the smaller business out. You can help, even if you don’t think you would ever become a member of the co-op, or if you think you can’t give very much. You all know that one bee makes just one teaspoon of honey, yet each teaspoon one after another adds up to fill your drums! If each bee looked on its own contribution as not being of significance, then nothing would get done and the hive would die. It is all a matter of numbers, and the smallest of numbers makes a difference. If you think that you’d like to help these folk in even a very small way get over the line, please email me direct. I will then send you the necessary documents to make a considered decision about donating, and how to donate. Remember the deadline, or maybe better to say the “start-line” is 5 pm 21 June 2019. So don’t delay! Thanks for taking the time to read this. To get more information please contact bruce via email at bruce@ceracell.co.nz, Bruce will be able to forward you documents in order for you to donate and join if you so wish. If you wish to still write questions please go to the already open thread on the forum. I prefer to have this as a notification and advisment thread. Kindest Regards Bruce Clow For the Proposed New Zealand Honey Producers’ Co-op For Each Other, For the Future
  5. Proposed New Zealand Honey Producers’ Co-op Where We Are At You may or may not know, there is a grass-roots movement underway to set up a honey producers’ co-operative in New Zealand. As the nexus of the movement, I thought I would let the wider beekeeping community know a little bit about what is happening, where we are up to, and see if you might be interested in joining the movement or maybe just helping in some tangible way. Background At Ceracell Beekeeping Supplies we are in regular contact with lots of beekeepers. Since about the middle of last year we have been getting feedback that things were not as rosy in the industry as the public believed. The messages of unhappiness, growing into despair, increased until in February this year it was very clear that many of our customers were really struggling financially. The word was that many had not sold any non-manuka honey last season, and couldn’t sell any this season as well at any price. And it wasn’t just new beekeepers feeling the financial pressure. Third generation beekeeping businesses were reporting that their banks which carried them through last year and this year were balking at extending overdrafts. The banks rightly were asking the question, that if you can’t sell your produce for two years in a row, why will it change for the coming season? At Ceracell we advertise that we are here to “help beekeepers”. Well it became pretty clear that right now “helping beekeepers” meant doing more than just selling them stuff. In April, I organised a series of meetings throughout New Zealand with the objective of finding out if the problem was nationwide, and what could be done about it. It is clear that the problem is nationwide. The problem in its most basic description came about because of the decade long frenzy surrounding manuka honey and the skyrocketing prices it was getting. Until MPI brought in the manuka honey definition, much non-manuka honey was being blended into manuka to increase volumes of that valuable specialist honey. As a result, the price of non-manuka honey got dragged up, and the inherent value of those other beautiful New Zealand honey varieties got ignored. So now blending has stopped and because there has been a decade of no significant marketing overseas of non-manuka varieties, at best honey producers can get international bulk honey prices, if it can be sold at all. But what to do about it? In talking to beekeepers, the word “co-op” kept popping up. “If only we had a co-op that could find overseas markets and build value-added brands, things would be better. At least we would know our honey would be bought. As it is, our usual private honey buyer won’t or can’t buy our honey.” At the meetings in which I met with about 300 people, there was a genuine desire to work together and help each other. The co-operative model which is widely used in New Zealand in the primary produce sector seemed to fill the criteria, so that was the starting point. I got some help from Michael Sage, a partner in the law firm, Simpson Grierson, who has expertise in co-ops. He brought on board a co-op experienced CA from the accounting firm, PwC, Justin Liddell. John Bell, a former tutor at Taratahi College and former lecturer in marketing at the University of Otago has provided valuable advice as well. What Is Happening Now? During and shortly after running the nationwide meetings I asked for people to make a verbal commitment to starting a journey towards establishing a honey producers’ co-op or some other model that would provide these primary benefits: Build an organisation based on the ethics and morality of helping each other. Commit to purchase the member’s honey in good years and bad years. Build brands and market the honey overseas. Return the added-value proceeds to the producer firstly through better gate prices and finally through dividends. Provide price guidance forecasts so the producer can start their season with some idea of what they will receive for their produce at the end of the season. There are many other benefits that a co-op can provide members, but these are the main ones that beekeepers wanted from their co-op. We received that commitment from over 280 beekeepers and beekeeping businesses that together run over 113,000 beehives. The conundrum is that building a business that can do the above would take a lot of money, and most of the people drawn to the idea are currently in difficult financial circumstances. So what to do? After a very in-depth and to the point meeting with our advisors, we came up with a plan. Step one was to seek donations to set-up a trust. The trust would be instructed to begin the detailed analysis of the business environment and the international honey market with a primary objective of creating a prospectus to put to potential members. The trust, with the help of beekeepers on a steering committee would begin building the co-op, that is, the constitution and rules of operation for when it would be incorporated as a co-operative company. The trust would also prepare a cogent application to ask the Government for significant funding to carry the business for a number of years until the members were financial enough to carry it themselves. Based on their extensive experience Michael and Justin felt that the very minimum that the trust would need to do these things, was $100,000. They also believed that a firm deadline to reach that goal should be set, because letting the issue drag on for many weeks without resolution would in fact cause the momentum that has been built with the goodwill shown by so many, to be lost. So on 27 May I forwarded the documents provided by Michael, asking for donations from the 280 beekeeping businesses, looking for a total of $100,000 by 5 pm on 21 June 2019. Those willing to help will deposit their donation directly into the Simpson Grierson solicitor’s trust account. If the total isn’t reached by the deadline, all the money donated will be returned to the givers. If and when the $100,000 is reached, the trust will be set up and we will start. This would not necessarily mean a co-op would be established, as it would be necessary that significant other money would be needed, but the first hurdle would have been overcome. Progress Yes progress is sure and steady, and the desire for the co-op is as strong as ever. Many have donated and some have donated a lot of money. Will we reach the target? I think it is a 50:50 call. I do know that some beekeepers who desperately want a co-op are in such difficult financial circumstances that they truly cannot give anything. Most of those that have given to date have given more on an individual basis than I would have thought possible. Others have said they will be donating, but the finances are so tight that the timing of dispensing cash is critical for them. Whether they can free it up by the deadline, time will tell. You Can Help The reason I am writing to the wider community of beekeepers is because these beekeepers, these people with children, and employees, need this co-op. And I think the beekeeping industry needs this co-op. On the weekend I had a chance to talk with a few of the 280, and I want to share with you an insight that Karl gave me. He said the beekeeping industry will end up like the fishing industry if we don’t do something. The fishing industry is now dominated by a few large New Zealand corporates and overseas corporates who own most of the quota. The small commercial fisherman has been pushed out of the industry. If these small to medium sized commercial beekeepers—family based beekeeping businesses—are allowed to fail, the beekeeping industry in four or five years will look like the fishing industry. The opportunity for someone to start-up a one-person or two-person operation will be gone. But with a co-op designed to be the path-to-market for the smaller operator that opportunity will always be there. Big money doesn’t have to drive the smaller business out. You can help, even if you don’t think you would ever become a member of the co-op, or if you think you can’t give very much. You all know that one bee makes just one teaspoon of honey, yet each teaspoon one after another adds up to fill your drums! If each bee looked on its own contribution as not being of significance, then nothing would get done and the hive would die. It is all a matter of numbers, and the smallest of numbers makes a difference. If you think that you’d like to help these folk in even a very small way get over the line, please email me direct. I will then send you the necessary documents to make a considered decision about donating, and how to donate. Remember the deadline, or maybe better to say the “start-line” is 5 pm 21 June 2019. So don’t delay! Thanks for taking the time to read this. Kindest Regards Bruce Clow For the Proposed New Zealand Honey Producers’ Co-op For Each Other, For the Future
  6. What is so bad with a member trying to raise money for a co-op, we only need 100,000 to take as a show of faith to the government. Desperate....of course, why is this being formed? Bruce only went to 20 or so meetings across the country and saw beekeepers who are in need of revenue to support themselves. We wanted to see if there was a solution to the key problem that beekeepers are facing right now, which is they can't sell their honey!! this is the core of the issue. As I said earlier, this is still very early in the process, questions being asked can't be answered until we get there. You have to crawl before you walk. We only asked for a small monetary investment from the individuals who have shown that they want to partake in the co-op, to get us to that 100,000 mark. The lawyer advising the co-op specializes in co-ops and we need to head his advice, it's that simple. We are learning and have looked at the previous co-op issues and will take those into account. Beekeeping suppliers, packers and beekeepers have not had it so good the last 7 years, where are your stats? It's all hearsay, I reckon, they charge so much, you know what I think, etc etc etc?? You don't know its that simple. Product development, marketing, machine maintenance, purchasing companies, new machinery, machinery breaking down, labour costs, infrastructure leases, trade show costs, overseas market development, website development, bank payments, beeswax purchasing, all costs a lot of money. I'm not saying companies don't put money away but costs simply don't vanish.
  7. @jamesc We will be at apimondia this september with the co-op, plenty of global honey buyers there, should be a great initial start. And yes a very great idea, any more are always welcome. cheers.
  8. Look I am a pawn on a chess set, I don't have the gold-winning answers. The co-op has not fully established itself yet, I can't run before I can walk. The Co-op will address these things when they arise, all it takes is effort and expertise to market non-manuka honey. The difference is beekeepers will own the co-op they will know how much the price of honey is and not speculation on what their neighbor got paid from the honey buyer down the road paid. As Mr boot said, New Zealand has set a high standard for our honey, the more regulation and protocol to make sure our product is of high integrity immediately puts New Zealand honey to a high standard. New Zealand honey is not your standard budget brand on the shelf stuff. Its great product, it's easy to sell great product, we just need the money and expertise to put it there in the consumers face.
  9. I should hope the government funds projects that help people, as well as brings economic wellbeing to the economy, which is what they would be doing in this instance. The way I see it is the industry is suffering and funding the co op to help get your honey to market to bring money back into New Zealanders hands is a huge win, especially for a primary industry in which the government is not held in high regard in farmers eyes.
  10. Come on @Ted, we haven't even started the co-op yet, the original co-op failed yes, but that was then and this is now. We are not them and they are not us. Does the co-op have pros, yes, does it have cons, absolutely. I don't see anyone else doing anything to help the industry, squeezing you guys for sales sure ain't gonna do anything for us and isn't going to help the industry. The solution is to help you put more money in your pocket so everyone improves here and the little guys are not pummeled out of a great industry and lifestyle. Going to the government with a small monetary backing looks more appealing to them than not, is what I am trying to get too, so it is still on the table
  11. @M4tt, that is taken out of context and not what was said, Bruce said in summary, going to the government without a monetary backing was suggested not a good move, it is like asking for a mortgage without putting in a deposit.
  12. Here is an update as to what went on in the meetings that Bruce held this month across the country. *If you are seriously interested in contributing to the co-op, please fill out the form from the link provided below: https://josieclow.wufoo.com/forms/z17wxm850eqhf17/ Hello again everyone, I hosted the last meeting on Wednesday. And my interpretation of the mood and tenor of all the meetings is “Wow”! I left every meeting with adrenalin pumping through my veins, and on such a high. There is categorically a strong ground swell of commitment to get a honey producers’ co-op up and running. But what excited me even more, a great desire by people to help; to contribute to the work, and to aid those in the industry who are struggling desperately. I met with over 300 people, and I know from the emails of apology that many more would loved to have come, but other commitments prevented them. I expect that some others just didn’t hear about the meetings, or were unsure. So I am asking that those people who are keen to get a co-op up and running, to please contact as many beekeepers in their area as possible. I don’t want anyone who could be interested or has a need to miss out. As I said repeatedly in the meetings, if we all do just a little bit, it will add up to something big! So why have the meetings universally endorsed setting up a honey producers’ co-op? A bunch of reasons! Firstly, honey producers are the only primary producers I am aware of in the country who start their season with no idea of what the price will be for their produce, or whether they can even sell their produce! The co-op would be the one giving pre-season price indications based on their market presence and the pull for product from their overseas customers, and be compelled to purchase their suppliers’ honey. Secondly, the combined might of the productive capacity of the co-op members gives them a voice with both the government and in the industry. The members through the co-op would no-longer be price takers, but price makers. Thirdly, harking to the moral and ethical reasons for beekeepers to associate through the co-op, it gives an opportunity to help each other and recognise need amongst the members. Refer to John Bell’s list (attached) where the co-op members can organise help to injured or ill beekeepers when that happens. Fourthly, it ensures that years of experience and knowledge are not lost! The co-op should and will become family where the older beekeepers who may not have relatives to share their skills with, need not see that expertise lost when they retire. Fifthly, again as per John’s list, the co-op would have buying power that will bring the cost of running their individual businesses down, as well as having the resources to help beekeepers deal with regulations and paperwork. Sixthly, if beekeepers want to exit the industry, the network of the co-op will help them recover value from their businesses and leave with dignity. This will also help prevent large numbers of hives being abandoned and becoming sources of AFB and Varroa to spread to actively managed apiaries. There were many more reasons that came out of the meetings about why a co-op is not only needed but essential if the huge resource of many commercial beekeepers and beekeeping families is not lost. It was also a pretty clear consensus that we go for a national co-op with regional centres. Being national, it will have some serious clout, but through regional centres, it will better be able to organise the use of spare infrastructure capacity, identify local needs, and build regional specialty honey varieties and the stories that will go with them. To move forward, I need a comprehensive list of those beekeepers who are committed and determined to set up a nationwide honey producers’ co-op for the benefit of those producers. The co-op will be entrusted with the marketing, building brands and other intellectual property for and around their honeys, and exporting them as the premium product they are, in an international honey market full of fake, counterfeit and adulterated product. With the list and the associated number of hives represented, John Bell and I will go to see the Honourable Shane Jones and ask for funding from the Regional Development Fund. (Note that both John and I believe we need a critical mass of at least 100,000 hives to get a hearing with the minister.) We are going to ask for $2,000,000 per region. I have named and listed the “regions” below (don’t get upset if I haven’t quite done them right, we’ll get there in the end), so when you send us your details, also tell us what region you are in. There are 15 regions, so we are asking for $30,000,000 total. For those of you in the earlier meetings, you won’t know about John Bell. When John got my email about the co-op meetings he got excited. He was a tutor at Taratahi, and is currently working with some Iwi to help them build their beekeeping businesses. Prior to working as a tutor, he lectured in marketing at the University of Otago’s MBA. He is eminently qualified to help. He was keen to see what I was up to, but couldn’t make the Hastings meeting, so we met the night before. When he showed me his list of things a co-op could offer beekeepers (see the attachment) I knew he had his head screwed on straight. John also has some knowledge of the workings of the Regional Development Fund, and contacts in Shane Jones’ office. Anyways, when I showed John the co-op set up timeline and the despair that caused some beekeepers, John said, “Bruce, we can shorten that timeline! Ceracell has already funded Phase I, and you have done the research with your national meetings and your investigation of co-ops overseas and the previous New Zealand one. Once the meetings are finished we get a list of beekeepers and their hive numbers and we go and see Shane Jones!” So that’s the plan. Those of you who are committed, send us the following info (all information will be treated totally confidentially), and please note that we want total honesty and truthfulness—we want to start as we mean to operate, with integrity at all times: Name(s) Business Name (if any) Apiary registration number(s) Postal address Contact phone number(s) Email address(s) Region(s) location of your business (where your hives are most of the time) Number of hives How much honey you have in storage (in tonnes)? How much honey you can produce in a good year? How much honey you can produce in a poor year? How much honey you can produce in an average year? Will you help as a regional co-ordinator? Are you willing and able to sit on a national steering committee? Is there anything else you can help with? The “Regions”: 1. Southland 2. Otago 3. Canterbury 4. Kaikoura/Blenheim 5. West Coast 6. Nelson/Marlborough 7. Wairarapa 8. Hawkes Bay 9. Gisborne/East Cape 10. Bay of Plenty 11. Manawatu/Kapiti Coast 12. Taranaki/Whanganui 13. King Country/Central Plateau 14. Waikato/Coromandel 15. Northland/Auckland When I get the list back, I expect that there will be more people ready and able to help on the steering committee than we can comfortably manage. We need to progress the co-op as fast as possible, so I don’t want to get bogged down in large committee meetings. I will likely have to come back and find out what the back ground is of each person wanting to help and choose to get a good representation of skills. I think with me, John Bell, an experienced lawyer (possibly Mike Sage), I will want about four or five others. So please, please if you aren’t chosen to be on the steering committee, don’t take offense. No offense would be intended, and everyone will be needed in some capacity at some time. This is not going to be a “political” animal and cannot be if it is going to work. We must treat each other with respect and kindness at all times, even if we disagree as happens in a family. Remember, in the end it is your co-op and you can change things as and when it suits. But to get going now, I will be making some executive decisions with expert advice. Once the legal entity of the co-op is established with the rules for governance in place, you, collectively, can change things as and when you like. I am waiting for those emails now. So decide if you are in as a founding member or not. After this email, only those who have replied and said “Yes, we are committed to make a co-op happen” will be kept in the loop. (If you don’t have an email address, post in your replies to: Ceracell, PO Box 204184, Highbrook, Auckland 2161.) I need those replies before 5 pm 30 April 2019. Then John and I will total things up, and finish preparing the application for Regional Development Funding. We’re going to Shane Jones as early in May as we can muster a meeting with him. So don’t delay! Send your email to my daughter who is collating all the contacts: josie@ceracell.co.nz Kind Regards, Bruce Clow
  13. until
    Do you have honey but no buyer in sight, or prices too low to cover costs? Let’s get together and talk about it. Bruce Clow, Managing Director of Ceracell Beekeeping Supplies (NZ) Ltd is travelling through-out the country in April hosting meetings with beekeepers who might be interested in starting a honey producers’ co-op, or looking at other ways to improve the financial returns for commercial beekeepers. Ceracell has always said that we are here “to help beekeepers”, and quite a number of our commercial beekeepers have expressed serious concerns about their ability to sell honey at a price that makes their business viable. Well Bruce says, “we are here to help”. Let’s see what we can do together. If things look dark and desperate, you are not alone. Come to one of the meetings and we’ll see what we might be able to do together. Also, let your commercial beekeeping friends know about the meetings, just in case they haven’t seen this notice. Topics that we might cover: Is there really a problem? What is a Co-op? What might be involved in setting up a Co-op? Are there other things a beekeeper might do to improve his/her bottom-line? If I want “out” how can it be done and recover value from my business? Is there “hope”? You are not alone! If you think you might like to come to one of the meetings, please email bruce@ceracell.co.nz and leave your contact details. That way Bruce can contact you in case anything untoward happens (such as a car breakdown or illness) which could result in a meeting being cancelled. Meeting locations (all times are 10 am to 12 noon):
  14. until
    Do you have honey but no buyer in sight, or prices too low to cover costs? Let’s get together and talk about it. Bruce Clow, Managing Director of Ceracell Beekeeping Supplies (NZ) Ltd is travelling through-out the country in April hosting meetings with beekeepers who might be interested in starting a honey producers’ co-op, or looking at other ways to improve the financial returns for commercial beekeepers. Ceracell has always said that we are here “to help beekeepers”, and quite a number of our commercial beekeepers have expressed serious concerns about their ability to sell honey at a price that makes their business viable. Well Bruce says, “we are here to help”. Let’s see what we can do together. If things look dark and desperate, you are not alone. Come to one of the meetings and we’ll see what we might be able to do together. Also, let your commercial beekeeping friends know about the meetings, just in case they haven’t seen this notice. Topics that we might cover: Is there really a problem? What is a Co-op? What might be involved in setting up a Co-op? Are there other things a beekeeper might do to improve his/her bottom-line? If I want “out” how can it be done and recover value from my business? Is there “hope”? You are not alone! If you think you might like to come to one of the meetings, please email bruce@ceracell.co.nz and leave your contact details. That way Bruce can contact you in case anything untoward happens (such as a car breakdown or illness) which could result in a meeting being cancelled. Meeting locations (all times are 10 am to 12 noon):
  15. until
    Do you have honey but no buyer in sight, or prices too low to cover costs? Let’s get together and talk about it. Bruce Clow, Managing Director of Ceracell Beekeeping Supplies (NZ) Ltd is travelling through-out the country in April hosting meetings with beekeepers who might be interested in starting a honey producers’ co-op, or looking at other ways to improve the financial returns for commercial beekeepers. Ceracell has always said that we are here “to help beekeepers”, and quite a number of our commercial beekeepers have expressed serious concerns about their ability to sell honey at a price that makes their business viable. Well Bruce says, “we are here to help”. Let’s see what we can do together. If things look dark and desperate, you are not alone. Come to one of the meetings and we’ll see what we might be able to do together. Also, let your commercial beekeeping friends know about the meetings, just in case they haven’t seen this notice. Topics that we might cover: Is there really a problem? What is a Co-op? What might be involved in setting up a Co-op? Are there other things a beekeeper might do to improve his/her bottom-line? If I want “out” how can it be done and recover value from my business? Is there “hope”? You are not alone! If you think you might like to come to one of the meetings, please email bruce@ceracell.co.nz and leave your contact details. That way Bruce can contact you in case anything untoward happens (such as a car breakdown or illness) which could result in a meeting being cancelled. Meeting locations (all times are 10 am to 12 noon):
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