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lexy

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lexy last won the day on December 2 2018

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  • Beekeeping Experience
    Semi Commercial

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  • Location
    wairarapa

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  1. could chuck the frames in the freezer overnight before putting them on the hive
  2. update: in the end i thought better of it and left the top entrances open, i put in wood shims to narrow them down to around 2cm wide - seems to be working well?
  3. top one is more like a handlebar mustache than a beard? clearly a lot more summery where you are than it is here
  4. I watched the site for 15 min or so and didnt see a great deal of movement on the top entrances... mostly just guard bees using it as a sunbathing deck. 90% plus traffic was at the bottom. in the end i concluded its best to block off access to the sun deck. I'm going with mostly single stack brood this season so it isnt a big walk, and perhaps the increased security upstairs coupled with limited brood space will encourage them to pack out the honey supers. Probably worth noting that the manuka has kicked off early and I've only put excluders on a lot of the hives recent
  5. funny you mention it, I just looked in a honey super (above QE) and found a sealed queen cell on the topbar! QE is fine, no eggs/larvae in box so the queen is definately downstairs. Guess that's one way to protect a succession cell?
  6. true, I've only joined hives like that a couple of times but its worked brilliantly... probably a technique I could use more often
  7. from what i can see a lot of them like to use them for sunbathing?
  8. hi, just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on excluders with a top entrance... I'm undecided I can see the benefit of the workers going straight in the honey box. But i have noticed that the the front parts of the frames directly adjacent to the top entrance are frequently left empty (presumably due to robbing risk) whereas my excluders with no top entrance get packed out. I wonder if there's a benefit to not having a top entrance because the bees consider the top box(es) safer because theres no way in for robbers? enough musings from me? th
  9. ages ago I read a paper that researched tempersture and crystal size - their theory was that lower temp reduced the mobility of glucose so it couldnt clump up and form large crystals
  10. luckily its extremely fine grained so all i have to to is make it liquid enough to homogenize and jar:-)
  11. sorry, a long time getting back to this.... on the plus side its not an urgent problem to resolve:-) true, thats a good idea. There is a commercial outfit nearby i could call on, I could just let it bulk mature until next season then chuck it in and deal with it then. Id just warm it enough so that its liquid, its finely grained
  12. i like the idea of just chucking it in a van or something, nice and easy - but i dont think it provides enough control, like I could reach the end of the day and have half melted honey. sounds like a bath is the way... another question occurs - how long will it remain liquid at room temp? homogenizing and jarring would take maybe 2 days:-( urgh.
  13. I have a similar problem to deal with at some point. I spun out my honey into 15 buckets (about 25kg kg each). Usually at that point I'd homogenize it all in a vat and straight into jars. Due to lockdown the jars didnt arrive and it solidified in the buckets... now i have to figure out how to melt it all at the same time whilst minimising HMF increase as much as possible (its manuka so HMF will be lab tested) Im thinking perhaps sitting the buckets in a bath at about 37c and opening them to stir occasionally until melted?
  14. if its been a dry summer and theres tutin in the area, you need to be mindful of tutin levels in your honey if you harvest after the flow
  15. depends on storage temperature as well, at lower temp a higher percentage of DHA goes down the chemical pathway to MGO (but painfully slowly). at higher temperature the conversion happens faster but more DHA disappears down pathways into compounds other than MGO
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