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Jamo

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Jamo last won the day on April 30 2019

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  • Beekeeping Experience
    Commercial Beekeeper

Location

  • Location
    Bay of plenty

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  1. Everyone that I have talked to about manuka has reported either not much or nothing, blaming either poor weather or poor flowering or both. Still a little bit of time for later areas but the weather will need to get better. Overall I am thinking that the national manuka crop will be well down this year.
  2. Not the best day to pick to shift some hives but added a little interest to the trip. Hope summer comes soon.
  3. Probably have to agree with you on that
  4. For sure it has been an interesting year and there have been some winners and some losers . The thing that i find interesting is the fact that the government has borrowed something like 70 thousand dollars per household from somewhere on our behalf and there are so many people out there that think that they are better off or no worse off. I am not saying that what the government did was right or wrong because I simply don't know but I do know that this borrowing will have a cost somehow, sometime.
  5. Yep Manuka flower buds form on last year's new growth and plants that were under significant stress during last summer's drought had very little new growth compared to those that had wet feet. The signs were there back in Feb that this year was going to be patchy in places.
  6. Certainly there were some ferocious bees back in the old days. The guy I first started beekeeping with back in the eairly 90s always had a spare pair of overalls in the truck that he would put on as a second pair over the top of his other's when things got nasty. Those bees make today's worst hybrids look like kittens.
  7. We have found quite a few hives with 2 queens this spring which kinda makes you wonder how many we haven't found.
  8. Ive got a story I bit like that. Happened last year. My veil at the time was getting a bit second hand and had a moderate size hole in it but not too much of a problem in spring when the bees are usually reasonably polite. One of our yards has a big Pukatea tree right beside it and while I quite like Pukatea's for their abundant pollen which nicely fills the gap between gorse and willow eairly and everything else later in spring this particular tree happens to be a favorite for swarms. It's quite tall and not particularly easy to recover swarms from. Anyhow one day about this time
  9. Generally grafted cells are started under queenless conditions and are therefore at least started under emergency conditions. Cells raised totally under emergency conditions are typically capped about a day earlier than those raised under superceedure / swarm conditions snd are theirfor not fed as much and don't develop as fully as queens. This is why most cell raising systems change to a queen right superceedure condition soon after the cells are started.
  10. Been out and about requeening a few problem hives this arvo. Question is, are we going to requeen that problem hive in Wellington?
  11. Are you feeding invert sugar? It can be prone to crystallization
  12. It seams that at the moment a third of the countries hives are producing honey that can't be sold at a price that is sustainable. I am afraid that I can't really see this getting better until the industry significantly downsizes. This might mean that many hives are abandoned and left to die and might be happening already. Can't really see how this situation can be described as "good shape" and it would be good if it was acknowledged a bit more.
  13. Some independent research results from a few years ago.
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