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Philip Allen

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  • Beekeeping Experience
    Beginner Beekeeper

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  • Location
    Auckland

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  1. Thanks for you reply. I think it was from one of my hives that was forming lots of queen cells recently. I destroyed the queen cells trying to stop the swarming. I think I should have left them. I'll look again soon. I gave the new swarm good drawn comb, plenty of pollen and honey. All ready to go. Cheers
  2. I caught a swarm one month ago in my camelia tree. I have 4 hives and have been beekeeping only 3 years. I set up a new hive with the swarm and it's done fantastically! What I can't understand is why it is so good if it's the an old queen. I haven't seen so much beautiful working brood in such a short time. 4 or 5 frames+ of solid brood. How come? Do swarms sometimes occur with new queens? ( Not that I am complaining.)
  3. Sorry don’t understand. Once paper eaten then the bees except for the queen will easily go both ways through a queen excluder. So what is the escape part for? Or are talking of a bee escape as Kaihoka means with a gap to outside between the boxes with sticks or similar?
  4. Thanks for the answers and the reference to older correspondence. The bee escape board above a queen excluder sounds a good option for next time.
  5. I lost my queen somehow recently, and have just added a nuc box using the paper method to separate it from 2 lower boxes of very active bees. Hopefully not aggressive drones. I will leave it for a couple of weeks then hopefully see a happy hive. If that's the case, do I then move the brood with the queen and brood lower down the hive, or just leave it where it is? Thanks
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