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Peter Bruell

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About Peter Bruell

  • Rank
    Nu Bee

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  • Beekeeping Experience
    Non Beekeeper - I do not want bees

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  • Location
    Auckland

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  1. Hi All, Bees in the fence. January 1st I had someone in to put down the hive. We had tried everything that had been suggested to save the hive but to no avail so pyrethrum powder was sprayed into all the openings we could find and the bees have gone so the problem has been resolved. Yesterday I removed a plank from the fence to see if I could see into the hive but found a 100x100 post with a small gap either side behind it so I am no wiser. I want to thank all or you who were kind enough to respond to my posts with advice and guidance that has educated and assisted me. In particular my thanks to Maggie James who has kept giving me first class feedback via emails and texts over the last month.You have a great organisation and I wish you all continuing success with your various ventures. Thanks, Peter Bruell
  2. Hi Maggie, The fence on our property is a timber slat fence. 150 wide slats with about a 15-20 mm gap between slats. It butts against our neighbours fence at right angles to ours which is a fibre board fence covering wooden frame. The bees have gone through the gap in our fence into the neighbours fence. I have photos but can't see how to post them on the site as it keeps saying you can only post 2 mb. The photos are much more than that. I could email them to you if you like. Thanks Peter. Hi Maggie, If we could get into the hive we could address removing the queen or the wax but all we can get access to is the entrances to the hive. The rest is somewhere in the neighbours fence with no obvious point of entry. Would petrol fumes kill off the hive rather than poison?
  3. Hi Maggie, If we could get into the hive we could address removing the queen or the wax but all we can get access to is the entrances to the hive. The rest is somewhere in the neighbours fence with no obvious point of entry. Would petrol fumes kill off the hive rather than poison?
  4. Hi Alistair, We live in St Heliers. 36 Auckland Road.Ph 021-660-486 or 09-575-7305
  5. Thanks everyone for the comments. First of all they are definitely bees. As winter approaches the hive becomes less and less active until you see no activity at all. I assume the bees have left or taken a winter nap. Each year as the weather gets warmer we see a swarm around our property and then themes make a B line for the hive which becomes active again. This year one swarm was removed from my neighbours property across the road but our lot stayed. This year the activity has been greater and the wall of the fence is often covered with bees coming and going. There are multiple entrances to the hive and we tried blocking these up except for one which we set up leading to a brood box. The bees refused to use that entrance and found new entrances to access the hive. They also became agitated and angry. One passer by being stung. That prompted me to remove the brood box. Thanks again, Peter
  6. I HAVE BEEs IN THE FENCE FOE AT LEAST 4 YEARS THAT I CANNOT REMOVE AND THEREFORE WILL NEED TO PUT THE HIVE DOWN, WHAT IS THE BEST WAY OF DOING THIS?
  7. Thanks Lee, that would be great.
  8. The bees if anything are getting more active. Lots of pollen being collected. At dawn groups of bees on the surface of the hive, face of the fence slats. Thinking I'll leave the hive alone until winter.
  9. Pulling a few slats is not an option, I would need to cut them out with a renovator or similar. I don't t We are in St Heliers.
  10. Photo below. The pollen sacks seem to be full on both rear legs. Do Wasps collect pollen in the same way bees do?
  11. I have a hive that has established itself in the cavity between my neighbours fence and mine. His fence butts up at right angles to mine. The bees gain access by crawling between the slats and have eaten part of the fence judging by the wood shavings that have fallen to the joist below. I don't want to destroy the hive so am looking for advice on a way to remove the hive. We have put a brood box close to where the bees are entering the fence which to date they have ignored. During the day the bees are very active and recently at night their are numbers of bees that seem to be working around the area close to a cross brace.
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