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Jan le Roux

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Jan le Roux last won the day on May 7 2016

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About Jan le Roux

  • Rank
    Pupa

Converted

  • DECA Holder
    Yes
  • Beekeeping Experience
    Hobby Beekeeper

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    Wellington

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  1. Interesting article about where getting stung hurts most: The Worst Places To Get Stung By A Bee: Nostril, Lip, Penis
  2. So once you tested for 3 consecutive years, you prove the whole apiary is clear of Tutin. I wonder for how long that is valid - just that 4th year then? I mean, how much time does a Tutin plant need to grow? By year 5 you might have Tutin within foraging range of your apiary, so then you are not clear anymore?!
  3. Not sure how much of crop I will have, but last year I had hives with at least a 3/4 super full of honey just before Christmas. This Ross System seem to be 1/2 depth - so I want to believe I will get some.
  4. Not about the cost of testing. My understanding is that you can not test for Tutin in comb honey as certain cells might have very high levels of Tutin and other cells nothing, so it would be a game of Russian Roulette when it comes to testing. Honey that is harvested before 31st December should be safe and not contain any Tutin. So assuming that Tutin is a non-issue up to 31st December, then according to the Youtube links associated with this Ross Round System, all you have to do is take the comb honey rounds out, and put the lids on the rings that contains the comb honey. Do you need to put the lids on in an approved kitchen, before you can sell it? Or can you just sell it?
  5. I am in Wellington. If I use a Ceracell Round Comb Honey System and I harvest the comb honey before 31 December, can I sell it?
  6. Needless to say that I do not know much about refractometers, and I do not have an instrument as yet. But I am looking to buy one. Currently looking on Trademe, Amazon and Aliexpress. Reading up on refractometers I found an number of meters where the description describe applications such as veterinary medicine, drug diagnostics, gemology/gemmology, marine aquarium keeping, homebrewing and beekeeping. So what I am trying to understand is, what is that I have to look for in a beekeeping refractometer? Yes, it helps - thanks! No I am not sure what I am looking at measure water content, but I would say that is what my goal is.
  7. Is a refractometer used for the measurement of salinity in salt water in marine aquariums, the same as a refractometer used to measure the water content in honey?
  8. In the yellow book "Elimination of American Foulbrood Disease without the use of Drugs" by Mark Goodwin, he talks about a trial that was conducted where they paired colonies with AFB and ones without AFB. They then closed the entrance between 1 and 3pm so that most of the foraging bees from the AFB hive was left behind. Most of these foragers then joined the healthy hive. They did this on 25 pairs of colonies and found that none of the colonies that remained behind developed visual symptoms of AFB. I am not sure what he longer term result was, but I agree with @Bron - we as beekeepers and our management practises causes most of the problems.
  9. Welcome to the world of beekeeping - it is a very rewarding hobby. Try to avoid the unnecessary costs - the ones that new beekeepers incur because they do not know enough about bees (bee biology, bee behavior, bee diseases, etc) when they take plunge and get bees too soon. There are also many options when it comes to hive furniture and how you are going to look after your bees, and if you get a bit of experience first, you can make better decisions on what to spend your money on. If you have not done so yet, join a club, attend the field days and talk to the experienced beekeepers. This forum will become a valuable resource, you will see. Costs not just limited to $, but also time. Make sure you know what you are singing up for. What ever your strategy, just DON'T rush into it all.
  10. Could you see if the outside temperature have any significant effect on the load cells?
  11. Hi Trev, What are those blue gloves you are using? Can bees still sting you through it?
  12. How formally do you agree on this with the the people? My concern is that a beekeeping season is a long time and people might forget what you discussed right in the beginning. @Kiwi Bee, @Diane and @frazzledfozzle - another thought: an Asure Quality inspector might want to come and do an inspection on the hives, but the access to the property is not under your control. And you might not be there when they do the inspection. Do you handshake this possibility with the hosts?
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