Jump to content

john berry

  • Content Count

    3,099
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    187

Posts posted by john berry

  1. Unregistered apiarys get a notice under the lid and after 30 days they  can be destroyed. Unfortunately if the site is registered but all the hives are dead or there is gear lying around everywhere there is not a lot that can be done about it at the moment unless there is a reasonable suspicion that it is AFB infected.

    I am not sure whether an AP one has the ability to deregister a site themselves.

  2. I have looked at the MPI's reasons for the ban but I cannot find why it was fine a year ago and now it's not.

    They are basically saying that honey is an animal product and as such you must be licensed to exported it.

    Mark Goodwin has argued that honey is not an animal product but a plant product and should be treated as such.

    I can see his point and think it's probably time that beekeepers in New Zealand United to get honey out of the animal products and into plant products. Sugar for instance is a plant product despite being heavily modified and refined by upright apes. One of the biggest problems with having honey called an animal product is that it is lumped in with things like meat and milk and I know what I would rather eat if it had been left sitting on a hot bench for a month.

    If stopping someone sending a few pots of honey in the mail is so vital to New Zealand's reputation why is it fine for the same person to take that same honey to the same person in their luggage? There are countries including New Zealand that do not allow the importation of honey for by security reasons and I have  absolutely no problem with that but for the rest it's just nonsense.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 3
  3. In any given year I see quite a few drone layers and partial drone layers along with plenty of queenless hives. I have seen what I believed to be laying worker's but in my hives anyway they are very very uncommon and I literally can't remember when I saw my last one. I doubt if I would see one every five years.. They do exist but the vast majority of supposed laying worker's are just drone layers which are often are a lot harder to find than a good laying Queen. When I do find one I tend to  load it up with frames of brood and young bees and sooner or later it will usually come right .

    • Like 1
  4. Try as I may I cannot understand why with no change in the law it has become a illegal to post honey overseas. I had several very disappointed customers today at the farmers market.

    I don't know a lot about what has happened but as far as I can see it is because of a ruling from MPI.

    It is way past time beekeepers stop being pushed around by bureaucrats with no idea of reality and the damage they cause and this is by no means the only situation where gross stupidity from people that are supposed to be helping the beekeeping industry have caused immeasurable harm.

    You can take honey in your suitcase when you fly to England and give it to someone so why can't you post it to the same person. Honey is not some deep dark illegal product.

    I would really appreciate people's thoughts on this.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 2
  5. I have seen the sort of scenario a few times over the years and even 10 years ago everyone  would have pitched in and helped even if they didn't like the beekeeper involved.

    Times have changed and most of the new beekeepers round here treat the existing beekeepers with total disdain and it's hard not to reciprocate.

    There are still a few people I would get out of bed to help but there are probably more that I would fall out of bed laughing which is a pretty sad state of affairs.

  6. Lemon honey never used to have any honey in it at all.

    Honey should be just honey. I also have no problem with people adding different products to honey but it absolutely should be labelled as such i.e. honey and raspberry or honey and vanilla.

    Creamed honey is generally the name given these days to crystallised honey . In the past it was only called creamed if it had been  crystallised in a tank and then  stirred and pumped to make it into a softer product.

    Raspberry honey is honey from the flowers of raspberries.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 3
  7. There is a lot of rubbish talked about entrances from people who have ideas that sound good but don't work out in practice. Hives don't need nearly as big an entrance as most people think and while they will use a top entrance so will  robbers.

    Years ago we used to run a few big two queen hives and they could be 8  full depth boxes high and yet they still all went in the entrance at the bottom. Most of the time you will get away with a top entrance but I don't believe it is of any benefit.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 1
  8. 6 minutes ago, southbee said:

    d bear in mind that the offender probably doesn't feel any shame if he/she doesn't care anyway. 

    They might care if you were able to take a civil action for damages and if I find out whose hives they were I very well may do.

    • Like 1
  9. My dream honey house would be in another country where they didn't have so many stupid rules.

    Other than that I would have 2 eight frame  tangential Extractors like we used to have years ago and hand planes but they would be electrically heated rather than the steam ones we used to have. I would probably settle for a spinner for removing the wax but I would have a good look around to see what's available.

    The old extractors were a lot gentler on the frames and were almost indestructible and you had very little downtime. Hand planes are a lot kinder on the frames and also have a lot less downtime plus you can afford to have a spare one or two if something does go wrong.  A lot of the old extracting plants were built on top of the platform so you didn't even need a pump.

     

    • Like 1
    • Agree 2
  10. I had a copy of this book but lent it to someone. From memory it covered most things but was a bit precious about things like sterile conditions and damp tea towels to protect freshly grafted cells. My father always grafted with the sun over his right shoulder while sitting on an upturned bee box, out in the paddock. You don't need all the bells and whistles.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 2
  11. 17 hours ago, Maggie James said:

    Where do you purchase these John?

    Protector safety I think , but you normally need to order them and the last lot I got were a bit small. There is no way I would wear rubber gloves without inner gloves as going down that road leads to nasty nail infections.

  12. I use PVC gloves with white cotton  inner gloves to soak up the sweat. You just need to get the softer type as some of the gloves are very inflexible. They do get hot but you don't get stung through them and they don't absorb honey, stings, varroa treatments et cetera.They also get washed every day unlike a lot of beekeepers leather gloves that I see that to be honest are pretty manky.

    • Like 1
    • Good Info 1
  13. Bees can and do make a real mess and over the years I think I heard more complaints about bee droppings than I have about stings. The more hives you have in one spot  the more spots they leave. Some people get really uptight and then you have situations like car sales yards which I think rightly hate having bees nearby.

    Having said all that most people manage to keep a hive or two in town without causing any grief.

     

  14. I like to have the beekeeper there when I am checking someone else's hives because I like to educate at the same time as I am doing a disease check. Having said that it is always a lot faster when the beekeeper is not there.

    • Agree 1
  15. Larvae is one of the words that the Dragon NaturallySpeaking does not seem to recognise and one of the words I find most difficult to spell so I generally use baby bee or grub.

    Antidisestablishmentarianism is easy with voice recognition software so why isn't la vie. 

    • Like 1
  16. The ad reminds me of the time we had a  beekeepers protest rally in Wellington. Frank Lindsey gave us all maps so us country cousins wouldn't get lost but unfortunately the map sent us the wrong way up a one-way street.

    There were rumours for years afterwards about bee trucks driven by  a long-haired,, bearded and wild eyed beekeepers wandering lost in the streets of Wellington,

    • Haha 9
×
×
  • Create New...