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Sailabee

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Everything posted by Sailabee

  1. Sorry @frazzledfozzle, not up to date at present, but at the Whangarei meeting I had the impression they were all struggling because the new testing regime meant that very little qualified as high rating manuka. Will hopefully know more after June 8.
  2. Agreed, it is possible to be all theory - but when it comes to understanding the new manuka tests, a through education in the biochemistry is what most of us beekeepers lack. Not only having the education, but as the principal of Tahi Honey John Craig has a unique grasp of the problems which the new tests have wrought on the Northland area.
  3. Try reading the info on John Craig on the Tahi Estate website - remarkable example of conservation blending with beekeeping. Over the last year Harrods of London did a big promo on Tahi Honey. Has the backround to truly understand the current problems of manuka testing, and was eloquently vocal as well as very versed in the technical side at the manuka testing consultation meeting in Whangarei.
  4. Still building leaky homes up here, in spite of the Council Building permit process which costs an arm and a leg, and much of the inner city cost of subdividing prohibits many of the subdivisions of existing urban sections being completed. For example, one large section with house in Browns Bay could as of right be subdivided into three under the city plan, but after family had worked it out, found they could spend $180,000, and still not have it finalised. It is hard for the rest of the country to understand the sheer evil and stupidity of a 'super city'.
  5. Yes, similar situation with the urban sprawl in what was rural Auckland, the hive carrying capacity is dropping all the time, and many of the developments have better than 90% site coverage with roading, buildings and paving. It's not how kiwis want to live, and many of the newbuilds will rot out fast enough to be replaced fairly quickly, sadly having demolished the bulk of the earlier homes built of heart native timbers which are routinely dumped into landfills.
  6. I believe that one of the large local suppliers have noticeably reduced front line staff, and I would think that with any sort of sanity the sales of flatpack hiveware will drop hugely as people rationalise hive numbers.
  7. Looking at the maths of the situation, when 290,000 hives produced 12,000 tonnes honey = 41.4 kg/hive 934,000 hives produced 20,000 tonnes honey = 21.4 kg/hive. Regardless of prices, if you averaged less than the average production per hive, two principle possible causes, severe overcrowding, and less than average beekeeping and management skills. Neither cause will be helped by trying to go into the next season with the same number of hives, rather than reduce numbers. This is a brutal way to look at it, particularly for those new to being self employed, but it really needs to come into the decision making - continuing the split/split/split game will only exacerbate both of the causes. There is no way a co-op will be able to reduce the impact of either cause for the individual beekeepers.
  8. In the crowded Greater Auckland area, unless all are on the same page, it will do little to dent the re-infestation. Personally I try and leave my own treatments a bit later to deal to the high level of re-infestation.
  9. Does the silicon shrink at all? Most of the moulding resins shrink 10 - 15%.
  10. With all due respects @Philbee, are you actually prepared to be told what date you will put your treatments in, or will you say that you don't need to do it as you are a special case? That is the nub of the problem because so many think the same way - I know it should be done, but at the ABC, several years ago, the then president of the club refused to even treat the hive they were managing in the club apiary with the same treatment on the same day as the rest of the hives - and that is how hobbyists are being instructed to act, and many past members have gone on to be commercials.
  11. Sorry, crossed lines, the locally produced rubbish was brown, overheated wax from when we only had one bee gear supplier company locally. I'm all for DIY in general, but worry that if the foundation was less malleable, could have trouble extracting with electric extractor.
  12. @Mummzie, do you find the DIY foundation is more brittle? The NZ Beeswax product is manufactured using the 'Weed' process which is double rolled to reduce that - according to their website blurb. It's definitely way ahead of the locally produced rubbish I started beekeeping using.
  13. Much of the 1080 rubbish is only viable because we now have many real city raised people - when we were kids, we were all small town kids, and everyone spent some time on farms - even if it was a friends or cousins in the mud, crud, and reality and there were few vegetarians let alone vegans, and we all knew where our meat came from. Now we have 'furbabies' - a word that seriously gives me the heaves, and many seem to think that food - including meat is produced in factories.
  14. I'm equally happy that I have not just spent a kings ransom setting up a glittzie company with a market structure that demands I sell honey for well about the average price to keep me in the manner to which I am accustomed.
  15. Hell I'm pleased I am a simple hobbyist, it's so much more fun. my spare honey simply 'disappears'.
  16. If you send the cleaned wax to NZ Beeswax - preferably with several other hobby beeks, you can just pay the processing on foundation. Even before I started to do this, I bought 15 kg cartons from them, and found no trouble finding others who would buy any surplus. By sending wax, the finished product comes down to about $7/kg, as against nearly $30.
  17. Just hope they eat all the GWA before they get culled - at least they don't stuff up honey frames. I have hoards of them on the windows on the SW side of house - thinking of putting in signage to the willows for them.
  18. The Southern Beekeepers discussion group has completed the first two rounds of sampling southern beehives at sites in Mosgiel and Lake Hawea for the American Foulbrood (AFB) research project, Clean Hive. However, a major AFB outbreak in the North Island is keeping the laboratory they are using busy with samples, so the results have been delayed. https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=12223153
  19. @Rob Stockley did one like that before he shifted to the Wairarapa, perhaps he could comment?
  20. @MissOlivia, please do not buy bees from anyone until you have spent several months reading and going to whichever club you choose, otherwise it will end in a dead-out come spring. Beekeeping is not something to suddenly take up without having a real depth of knowledge - many on this forum have decades of full-time experience behind them and many are very helpful, but it is utterly frustrating retrospectively explaining why a hive died.
  21. Are the stuck bees trying to get in or out please?
  22. We can but hope that a sledge hammer sentence is applied, rather than the traditional wet bus ticket to signal to the other offenders (and there will) so that a clear message is sent.
  23. Agree with cBank, and also the Silky brand - also Japanese manufactured. Have one of each brand, both excellent once you adjust to it cutting on the pull rather than push stroke.
  24. I sincerely hope they class the yeasts that produce alcohol as animal, would seem product may be wasted otherwise.
  25. Pity we can't do as the Aussies do and just fire everything, boxes and frames through a gamma sterilisation plant which not only deals to the AFB, but any viruses, varroa small hive beetle or wax moths. Fast - two hour turn around, not even expensive to do either.
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