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Sailabee

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Everything posted by Sailabee

  1. When the NZ unit was built, walls were two foot thick concrete - the Aussie jobs I believe the walls are three metres thick, and they are several stories high, all completely automated. Capital cost would be huge.
  2. There is a plant in Upper Hutt - built in the '60's. Was originally used to steralise dressing packs for hospitals etc, built by Tasman Vaccine Laboratory. In Aussie, they have huge plants where for jack zip, you put through all supers with frames, and totally steralised- including hive beetle, EFB and AFB as well as any viruses. Last I heard, about $15/box.
  3. If being used for topical application, pretty sure needs to be radiated - which now has to be done in Aussie as the one local plant no longer outsources.
  4. We use sacks from coffee roasters - and there's a few of them to keep the latte sippers happy. Hang them on a fence for the winter as some may have insecticides in them. The seed potatoes sold in the red shed are supplied in small sacks - try a grovel there, also need the fence treatment to burn nicely also.
  5. Reckon with that output, @Alastair you could use it instead of escape boards or a blower to clear bees from honey supers at extraction time, never mind smoking a good catch of fish.
  6. Suggest you also co-opt Treecrops and local gardening club/group - gardeners participated in the submissions to the Auckland not so Super City when they were about to bring in loony regulations and fees - over 300 fronted up including the beeks, and it is important to realise the family fruit trees and some vegetable crops will fail unless there is a reasonable number of hives in an urban setting.
  7. Sailabee

    Bayvarol

    Gosh, just as well we heard the phrase 'hive years' here, as even Google hasn't found it yet.
  8. Sailabee

    Bayvarol

    Possibly because they have the residual of the whole honey crop to defend and enjoy?
  9. There used to be Gerrad Springs in Great South Rd, they make all sorts of springs, now they are called CMI Springs, address 7A Carmont Place, Mt Wgtn.
  10. Sailabee

    Bayvarol

    I bet they felt less victimised than the poor devil who paid $3000 for a nuc because of unchallenged false claims.
  11. Sailabee

    Bayvarol

    The Questions Alastair asked did need asking, and answering as some were signing up to pay something like $3000 for supposed treatment free nucs, and even in those golden times was preposterous.
  12. So called tutors who talk like that often then say 'boy have I got a deal for you' and sell you 'bargain nucs' at three times the going rate.
  13. Well @Colorado_Chris, you have just collared the most comprehensive range of different and excellent beekeepers, I wish I was young enough and fit enough to spend a day with any of these people, never mind the whole lot, truly a golden haul!
  14. Must be the effect of you being on the wrong side of the equator, as here, I have never seen a feral colony where the bees enter and descend to the colony, only ever go up.
  15. I don't know, but either way, the beekeeper worked for diddly squat. I very much doubt the supermarket took a hit, but the upside is that it may bring honey back on the shopping list for more families.
  16. Last week at Pak n Slave Silverdale, $5 99/500 gms, Airbourne Honey.
  17. I spent a couple of decades working in chemical product development and the wider the information base, and the wider the distribution of product assessment and trialing, the greater relevancy of the results. Personally, hives which had no honey crop taken off do not really compare with any commercial operation that I know of, and indeed many hobbyists.
  18. I would have thought that the very experienced like Alastair who had both ox/gl and Bayvarrol in each apiary trialed to eliminate most of those variables. Particularly where it would mean the opportunity to observe hives in a real commercial situation where last seasons honey was taken off the hives.
  19. Never mind the out-goings of a bloated board of directors, who would be hard pressed to lift a single frame of honey, never mind a full super, but quite able to make all the decisions.
  20. Realise you are at the traffic lights, but you may have sent the newly hatched pink queen bee into the screaming abdabs with that post.
  21. And those of us who remember Rob Muldoons quote will know what the result of that will be.
  22. Put treatment strips in asap, and they only need to be in there for a week if there is no sealed brood yet. Difficult to give idea of how fast they will draw out frames, as most of us use foundation, and here anyway, been blowing for weeks, so little pollen or nectar being bought in. If you have cruddy weather, consider feeding - even dry white sugar, they will only take it if they need it to prevent starvation.
  23. Governor Grey introduced the wallabies, and like typical Aussies, quickly got out of hand. Last I heard there were non left. Those that started the poisoning were strongly and invisibly supported by DOC I believe, as eradication was the only way to green up the island. As a brown one, it was a huge fire waiting to happen, with no reticulated water to fight it. The bird life was stunning five years later - both weka and kereru in abundance, I often saw several kereru at a time - and that was just on one six acre block.
  24. Kawau Island is a prime example of just what can be achieved with baiting - in that case wallabies and possum. When I started sailing, whole island was brown - dead and dying trees, all native and then the non latte lot started fencing their weekend properties 2 metres high with wire netting, and as the walkways had always provided access to all the private properties they crossed, so the yachtie lot put in gates with weights and pulleys so they automatically closed. Of those that were longterm residents without the means, the townies subsidised the missing bits. Within five years, island was lush green. Best bit was when DOC captured some of the wallabies and sold them back to the Aussies - bonus!
  25. While not zero, the usage level of most sprays has dropped dramatically nationally since the regulations changed and buying anything other than domestic quantities requires a suitable certificate - much like the Vestex system. The total imports of agri-chemicals has dropped, so the system is moving in the right direction. It is now unusual to see vast tracts of paddocks totally sprayed out for re-grassing, compared to twenty years ago.
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