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Karin Kos

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Karin Kos last won the day on November 5 2012

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About Karin Kos

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    Larva

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    Bee Research

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    New Zealand

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  1. For those of you asking if ApiNZ is involved in any work on the management/eradication of scolypopa we have raised this with the Science and Research Focus Group which will be meeting earlier than usual in the new year. We are aware that the hot/dry weather this season is making the issue more urgent in certain parts of the country.
  2. Rob – That’s correct. The purpose of the campaign is to educate new beekeepers or beekeepers unaware of their options/steps they can take in meeting obligations, to remind/direct anyone to existing information on managing the risk of tutin contamination in their honey and to provide the opportunity to ask the MPI Animal Products team questions about tutin. If there are any updates/new information we are aware of it will be posted on here and updated on MPI’s webpage on tutin: http://www.mpi.govt.nz/growing-and-harvesting/honey-and-bees/managing-tutin-contamination/
  3. Hi @Rob Stockley, Thanks for your feedback. ApiNZ is working with MPI to develop and deliver information on tutin during the high-risk period to all registered beekeepers via multiple channels, including this forum as well as the NZ Beekeeper Journal, an email to all registered beekeepers, and offers of updates from MPI at club and hub meetings. Following feedback from last year, as a new feature MPI are answering any technical questions via this discussion thread. Raising awareness about tutin is crucial at this time of year and we want to make sure all beekeepers understand what it is and what their legal obligations and options are for meeting them.
  4. See attached a letter from NBA President, Ricki Leahy, addressing the recent communications from a small group of NBA members that is currently circulating the NBA membership. Putting our industry ahead of personality politics.pdf Putting our industry ahead of personality politics.pdf
  5. To all Industry Stakeholders A request for funding assistance. June 2014 was a milestone for our industry, after many years of segregation industry stakeholders came together as one to learn, discuss and share thoughts and ideas at the first New Zealand Apicultural Conference held in Wanganui. Attendance numbers throughout the conference exceeded expectations, and a big vote of thanks must go to the enthusiastic organising team who delivered an excellent programme. The conference theme was “Working Together”, the discussions and debate certainly focussed attendees on critical issues and sent a very clear message to industry leaders that the status quo was not delivering the outcomes sought by stakeholders, particularly relating to inclusive unified representation and core industry funding. In August an Interim Working Group (IWG) was formed to consider how our industry should best be structured, administered and funded. Appointees to the IWG included executives of the NBA, FFNZ BEES, the Honey Packers & Exporters Association and the hobbyist sector. After due consideration it was determined that transparency and independence will be critical elements in the success of this review and that this would be best achieved by the appointment of a suitable facilitation company from outside of the industry to undertake this task. The goal - “Deliver to all industry stakeholders a proposal to establish and achieve a fully inclusive, fully funded industry group structure that will be a strong platform for future growth and prosperity.” The IWG can now confirm the appointment of Catalyst NZ Ltd to undertake this nationwide survey of all key stakeholders. This survey will be completed by the 31 March 2015, at which time Catalyst NZ Ltd will deliver their recommendation. The IWG is requesting the support of industry to provide the working capital needed to fully fund this project. This investment is a critical step, please be generous with your contribution, you are the beneficiary of this work. We ask as an interim step that you complete the funding pledge sheet attached and return this to any of the email addresses listed below. An independent accountancy firm will manage the financial requirements of this project, they will send out invoices relating to each pledge once the pledge form is received. Please participate at whatever financial level you see fit, it is your future, your industry. Should you be contacted as part of this survey, please be honest and frank with your interviewer, have your say and make your contribution. WORKING GROUP MEMBERS are available to address any of your questions: Allen McCaw HPEA Dennis Crowley NBA John Hartnell FFNZ Bees Kim Poynter Hobbyist Rep Kim Singleton NBA Peter Bell FFNZ Bees Ricki Leahy NBA Thank you Kind regards John Hartnell MNZM MEMBER – APICULTURAL INDUSTRY INTERIM WORKING GROUP Box 31-209, Christchurch, New Zealand FUNDING PLEDGE SHEETS may be emailed to: pauline@nba.org.nz Alternatively post to: Apiculture Unification Project PO Box 31-209, Christchurch Pledge Return Form Industry Unity Survey 11.2014.pdf
  6. This information may be helfpul: Question - What do I need to consider if I want to sell my home produced honey A1. Operating under the Food Act 1981 Bee products, including honey, that are produced for domestic consumption, may be produced under the requirements of the Food Act 1981. Whether you are a primary or secondary processor, the Food Act requires that you must either: · Operate under the Food Hygiene Regulations 1974, which are administered by your local council (Territorial Authority), · Or · Operate under a registered Food Safety Programme (FSP), which has been audited by an external expert. Food Safety Programmes New Zealand Legislation: Food Hygiene Regulations 1974 You must also meet the requirements of the: The Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code which covers labelling and composition of food in New Zealand (see A2) and The Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010. (see A3) A2. Meeting the requirements of Food Standards Code which covers labelling and composition If you process and/or package honey for sale you need to comply with the labelling requirements laid out in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. This includes nutrition information find out about the requirements under the Food Act 1981 Honey Labelling Requirements: Information Pamphlet . Product name - ‘Honey’ must appear as well as a ‘lot’ or batch number, the name and address of the packer and nutritional information. You can find general information about labelling and composition in the General requirements section of the site. Labelling & composition A3. Meeting Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010 Tutin contamination, which causes toxicity in honey, is often found in late-season honey in some parts of New Zealand. It occurs when bees collect honeydew from passion-vine hoppers that have been feeding on tutu (Coriaria arborea), a poisonous New Zealand shrub. From 1 January 2011, all honey for sale or export for human consumption must comply with the Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010. A guide to compliance, provided by MPI, explains what you must do and includes information on how testing is done. If you are a hobbyist beekeeper who only produces honey for your own use, MPI recommends that you follow the standard. (Read Part 1 of the standard, to learn about the options) If you donate or barter your honey, then that is a form of trade and you must comply with the Food Standard 2010 for tutin in honey. Beekeepers and packers of honey for sale must comply with this standard under the Food Act to show that their honey does not contain toxic levels of tutin. Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010 (61 KB PDF) Compliance Guide to the Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010(199 KB PDF) Kind Regards, Miriam Nicholson Executive Secretary of the NBA
  7. @@Cyathea We would recommend you call MPI immediately. They will be able to determine if it is a case of Tutin poisoning and take action if this is the case. Please call the MPI Consumer Helpline on 0800 693 721 or email: info@mpi.govt.nz Alternatively Cyathea, if you could contact the NBA and leave your contact details for us to contact you, it would be most helpful. You can find the NBA phone number on our website Welcome to the National Beekeepers' Association of New Zealand website. - NBA under the contact us section. We have also put some answers to questions in this thread below: Question - What do I need to consider if I want to sell my home produced honey A1. Operating under the Food Act 1981 Bee products, including honey, that are produced for domestic consumption, may be produced under the requirements of the Food Act 1981. Whether you are a primary or secondary processor, the Food Act requires that you must either: · Operate under the Food Hygiene Regulations 1974, which are administered by your local council (Territorial Authority), · Or · Operate under a registered Food Safety Programme (FSP), which has been audited by an external expert. Food Safety Programmes New Zealand Legislation: Food Hygiene Regulations 1974 You must also meet the requirements of the: The Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code which covers labelling and composition of food in New Zealand (see A2) and The Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010. (see A3) A2. Meeting the requirements of Food Standards Code which covers labelling and composition If you process and/or package honey for sale you need to comply with the labelling requirements laid out in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. This includes nutrition information find out about the requirements under the Food Act 1981 Honey Labelling Requirements: Information Pamphlet . Product name - ‘Honey’ must appear as well as a ‘lot’ or batch number, the name and address of the packer and nutritional information. You can find general information about labelling and composition in the General requirements section of the site. Labelling & composition A3. Meeting Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010 Tutin contamination, which causes toxicity in honey, is often found in late-season honey in some parts of New Zealand. It occurs when bees collect honeydew from passion-vine hoppers that have been feeding on tutu (Coriaria arborea), a poisonous New Zealand shrub. From 1 January 2011, all honey for sale or export for human consumption must comply with the Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010. A guide to compliance, provided by MPI, explains what you must do and includes information on how testing is done. If you are a hobbyist beekeeper who only produces honey for your own use, MPI recommends that you follow the standard. (Read Part 1 of the standard, to learn about the options) If you donate or barter your honey, then that is a form of trade and you must comply with the Food Standard 2010 for tutin in honey. Beekeepers and packers of honey for sale must comply with this standard under the Food Act to show that their honey does not contain toxic levels of tutin. Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010 (61 KB PDF) Compliance Guide to the Food (Tutin in Honey) Standard 2010 (199 KB PDF) Kind Regards, Miriam Nicholson Executive Secretary of the NBA
  8. NATIONAL BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL SEMINARS & CONFERENCE HOTEL ASHBURTON SUNDAY 16TH June 2013 9.30am – 1.30pm SMALL & HOBBY BEEKEEPERS PRACTICAL SESSION Plank to a Hive – Practical Woodware Elements Top Bar Hives – Alternative style home for bees Runaway Bees – Swarms and beehive management Beeswax – Rendering Small amounts of Beeswax American Foulbrood Pest Management Plan (AFB PMP) - American Foulbrood disease awareness (Morning Tea and Lunch included in Registration)
  9. We try to please, Frazzled
  10. Hi all Please see below for a media release put out by the NBA this afternoon. Cheers Daniel Manuka prices inflated The National Beekeepers’ Association (NBA) wishes to correct misleading information, circulating in some media, that beekeepers are earning up to $400 a kg for bulk manuka honey. NBA chief executive, Daniel Paul, says this is incorrect. At best, beekeepers are earning up to $50 a kg for bulk manuka honey which is UMF 20+. And they’ll be earning less than that for other products. “Retailers could be earning up to $400 a kg, but that’s certainly not what the beekeepers gets,” Mr Paul said.
  11. Hi Frazzled It was free because we had a contractual agreement with SFF to make this information as widely available as possible. It was seen as a public good project. This was in return for the NBA receiving many, many, many thousands of dollars of public/government money from SFF over many years to fund the research. I stress here the deal, signed a long time ago when the research was first proposed, was to make this information available to as many beekeepers as possible, not just to as many NBA members as possible. Even if we had charged $5 (or a token charge) that wouldn't have generated much revenue in the overall scheme of things. Maybe the situation was not ideal, but that was the deal that was done at the time in order to access the research funding in the first place. Does that help? Cheers Daniel
  12. Hi all - may I address the heading to this thread plse? Firstly let me point out the NBA is NOT going broke, by any means. This is a temporary blip brought about by a one-off project that we needed to put on for all beekeepers. Please note that our membership is increasing and our revenue is up year on year in the past three years. Our financial situation, while 'tight' at the moment, is no different to what it's always been. In fact with membership increasing, it's perhaps somewhat better. Secondly, we have plans to increase membership and income even further by reviewing our subscriptions and membership categories. That should encourage even more beekeepers to join us, furthering strengthening our financial position and enabling us to do even more positive things for beekeepers. Watch this space! Re the VSH workshops - yes they did come at a cost to the NBA. But it's a cost we committed to some years ago when we first entered the contract to undertake extremely valuable research into varroa resistance. This is one of the reasons the NBA exists - to undertake research that will help beekeepers in NZ. Research into varroa resistance is right up there on that priority list. As I said, that kind of research comes at a cost - but that cost is an investment. Yes, non-members benefited for free, but sometimes that's the way it goes. We are part of an industry and everyone of us is threatened by resistance to varroa treatments - NBA members and non-members alike. The NBA's investment was on behalf of our industry and our bees. It would be great if all beekeepers were members of the NBA and contributed to the research costs, but not everyone wants to do that. We did try and secure new members through the workshops and we did actively promote the NBA. And we did ask for donations and some people even gave us a donation. If any of you wish to give us a donation now, it would be gratefully received. Thank you Daniel Paul
  13. We'll keep working on it for you, Frazzle. The fat lady's not sung yet!
  14. Hi all - thanks for all your comments on this issue. It's really good to see the range of views. As you may know by now, the NBA has signed the MOU (Memorandum of Understanding) with MPI to EXPLORE THE VALUE PROPOSITION in GIA. Those words are in caps to stress them. We're EXPLORING the value proposition. There may not be one. There may be. We can all have a view - but we won't really KNOW until we test it. And that's what we aim to do over the coming months. As I have said publicly the govt can't expect on the one hand to introduce Aussie honey with all the threats it poses and on the other expect us to pay for any B/S problem. So you can be assured that issue will be very, very high on the value proposition (in other words, how do we manage pre-border controls to avoid post-border problems). If we can get some traction on that issue, beekeepers may feel there is some value in GIA. I've already had that preliminary conversation with MPI but it's something that we need to put a lot more effort into as part of exploring the value of GIA. Cheers Daniel
  15. Hi guys - we are very sure the GIA will thro up heaps of different views, but at least the MOU process will allow all beekeepers to get a better idea of the pros and cons. And therew will be both pros and cons. Importantly, though, it will give us a chance to see exactly what we can do to strengthen pre-border controls so we're not left holding the baby. In simple terms if we don't sign the MOU and have a look, we'll never really know ... You can be assured that we'll keep members fully appraised of what's going on . Give me a shout if you've got any questions. Cheers
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