Jump to content

Rob's BP

Members
  • Content Count

    356
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    7

Seller statistics

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Rob's BP last won the day on March 21

Rob's BP had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

262 Excellent

About Rob's BP

  • Rank
    Pupa

Converted

  • Beekeeping Experience
    Honey Marketer

Location

  • Location
    Tauranga

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Perhaps the fact they've got up and out of here indicates they have above average ambition and motivation. And there's often no welfare system for foreigners to fall back on. Immigrants around the world tend to be hard working, making a new and better life for them and their families. Hence the phrases "working like a Dutchman" and more recently heard "working like an Indian".
  2. Never has. "If the supermarket does not stock it then they lose sales." Well the NZ supermarkets don't stock Comvita, and yet PNS etc are doing fine. Meanwhile Comvita isn't. What does that say about who has the power? Yes, some international customers want Comvita, not Bob's manuka, but there are plenty of others who want a lower priced brand of Manuka too. Those lower priced brands largely ride the coattails of the awareness and premium perception Comvita (and others, but Comvita more than any other) has created. There are complimentary synergies and other benefits from vertical integration. E.g. they know and control all aspects of the honey's origin, production, quality, inputs and timing of supply. To take one of these points that is seldom appreciated, timing of supply: it's pretty frustrating and inefficient to have a multi-million $ facility, and a whole bunch of staff employed who have little/nothing to do at times, and the flow on effects of out of stocks to the customers and export markets because independent suppliers supply according to their preferred schedules, not C's production requirements. And then there are other times when they have to work double shifts, pay overtime, need extra storage space etc.
  3. This seems very much to be looking over the fence and saying the grass is greener. Or looking up the vertical integration line and saying the next step up makes more money than me. And that is without knowing and/or underestimating the costs, risks, knowledge, time and $ investment required. So many NZ beekeepers, made wealthy over ~20-5 years ago, looked enviously at the packers/marketers and said "I can do that too. Why should they make the big $ from my honey" So they "invested" in a packing plant and/or their own labels and tried to DIY it...how many of these many beekeeper brands have become or ever looked like becoming the next Comvita or Manuka Health (the so-called most powerful players in the game)? The brand owner is not the most powerful player in the game. The supermarkets are. They have the pick of the dozens or hundreds of brands begging for the privilege of getting on those shelves, and can dictate prices to them. They have the lowest risk levels: if one or many doesn't work, there are plenty others to take their place; even if the whole category doesn't work, it is balanced by all the other categories. I've seen some of these smaller, less costly approaches. How could they be less costly? Let's see: by cutting corners, not doing what they were obligated to do, yes some had dodgy practices, and many if not all don't count the real and total costs of their inputs. None of these are recipes for long term success, and are not scalable or sustainable. The way to be less costly production has been indicated in the Chicken industry discussion above @Ted: huge volume utilization of fixed cost capital asssets, minimal labour and variable cost inputs, high levels of automation, virtually guaranteed demand and minimal time spent on sales/marketing, just concentrate on and do what you're best at... Re. "more profitable": While in theory there could be a profitable neiche somewhere, but in reality NZ honey products are very easily imitated (by others in the NZ honey industry), so a neiche doesn't remain profitable for long.
  4. There is no way kiwis can match their productivity, volume or costs. Have seen several try to make RJ here, and costs were many, many times higher priced than imported product, and volumes tiny.
  5. Hmm, they probably feel the same way i.e. they would buy your NZ propolis if you matched your competition. Pot/Kettle? The owner of a major NZ natural products company told me their Propolis is a blend of NZ and foreign [Chinese] propolis. The NZ component was what came from the hive in his garden!
  6. I said "we can reasonably expect they'd be similarly stringent with Propolis" not that their honey and propolis import standards are similar. Buyers should know it's imported from elsewhere, it's clearly stated on pack. Refer to the first line in the image below.
  7. Mate, I have very good knowledge of what NZ's propolis supply was some years back, and it was much less than the 20MT reported to have been recently imported. There's no way Comvita could get that much Propolis from NZ . Since they have the demand, and a legal method of supplying the demand, with quality assurance they've done so. Note, Comvita's quality standard must be very high since it's not hard to figure a lot of it will be going to China, and we know China has some of the most stringent quality standards for importing honey so we can reasonably expect they'd be similarly stringent with Propolis. So, we can be assured they're not importing dirty/dodgy/contaminated product to NZ.
  8. OK @Ted mentioned it later in the thread. Good on you Ted. It's the truth, but seems unpopular among this crowd. @Daley what they are doing is completely legal. If you don't like that go and complain to the regulators - oh and you'll need scientific evidence i.e. proof, not just your negativity and anamosity. Also, they've been importing for >10 years with no reported issues. And now they've bought into the supplier, so can have more influence over the harvesting, storage, processing etc. that happens there. The point of which is they now have greater control over product quality and safety.
  9. Simple answer that so far no one has mentioned: NZ doesn't produce enough propolis to fill the consumer demand. You can't fault Comvita for that, but it seems plenty here will. Comvita's honey business has been propped up by it's Propolis business. Imagine what the losses would have been if it was solely reliant on it's loss making honey business. And yes, Comvita has done a heck of a lot for those in this industry, but all it receives on this forum is negativity
  10. Ah yes, "We're going to buy Greenland, and Mexico is going to pay for it"!🤣🤣🤣
  11. Yep, really enjoy Tony Alexander's weekly overview. Look out for it on Thursdays. He's almost always right, very relevant and writes well
  12. Yes, same in Pak N Save: 250g is $5.00, 500g is around $11.00. Surprises me, everyone else charges less per gram as the pack size increases. Manufacturing and package costs are about the same irrespective of size...
  13. and creating negative externalities for the rest of us
  14. Hi Fraz, yes this information is freely available on the stats.govt website. Takes a bit of finding but it's there in great detail (per country and by HS codes). Unlike Australia's. There are no honey production/export stats available, unless you get it commissioned by the Aus Dept of Stats. I enquired and they said it would cost $620 just to start an enquiry and rise from there depending on what was required!
×
×
  • Create New...