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  1. If you do find out, first thing to do is send them an invoice for damages. Make it realistic - i.e. fair values but make it complete, travel, time etc cost of digging hole.... At this point you have established a cost. The beekeeper may actually decide to pay the bill. I have experienced this. If they don't, they are now very aware of the cost to someone else that their actions (or lack of) have caused. At this point if they refuse to pay, you can take them to the disputes tribunal. The cost is low, tribunal is less like a court and more like an arbitration. Depending on how
    9 points
  2. I've put some resources up, including a free online training program at
    8 points
  3. EpiPen costs 120 and lasts in excess of 12 months usually. That's nothing near the 320 you estimated. You order them online from Queenstown with free nationwide delivery, which means no trips into town. Additionally ACC would reimburse you had you used it on the guy who was choppered out, or anyone else. Not everyone has a history of being allergic. You could have had 200 stings before with nothing and sting 201 causes a reaction with no prior history. However it's turning into an interesting thread now because it's highlighting the sheer lack of
    7 points
  4. Varroa have been a part of my beekeeping life forever. In the Forum archives (back to 2012) I have posts whinging about going to beekeeping conferences here and abroad full of promise and short on delivery when it comes to ways of managing the problem, and I retain what I think is a healthy scepticism about what I will call the ‘selective breeding’ route to a solution. From selecting for hygienic behaviour using pin or freeze killed brood assays in the mid-eighties, to the first Bond test (“Live and Let Die”) in 1993, selection for post-capping duration in the mid ‘90’s, and more recent work w
    6 points
  5. Drone layers can be hard to find but not all of them look terrible. If I find them, I squash them.
    5 points
  6. Another method which I have used successfully is to turn off the laying workers by giving a series of frames with open brood which produces a pheromone with the required effect. One a week until workers stop laying (usually 2-3 doses) and it boosts the hive with brood as it hatches, then give a cell or queen when it is safe, or combine with a queen right hive. This does take time and uses resources, but very interesting for a hobby beekeeper.
    5 points
  7. After you posted about this a few months ago Goran, I made a honey and kawakawa mix. (Kawakawa is a native NZ plant that Maori believe to be very healthy and a treatment for sickness). It did work, but tastes very bitter so I don't think it will be a commercial seller. Interestingly the honey has not granulated, stayed totally liquid. Whereas the exact same honey that does not have kawakawa, all granulated quite some time ago. It's in the pantry and will be getting used if anyone here gets sick .
    5 points
  8. If I was moving up to 500 colonies, I would want the Cowan 28 extractor with the Silver Queen uncapper. We currently have no plans to move up to that sort of scale and have built our extracting around a Mann Lake 18 frame radial unit. The other bit we did when we built our new honey shed, we put in a small room well insulated for storing honey prior to extracting. We call it the 'warm room', but in fact it's more like a 'warm closet', set up to hold 100 supers max. This year was the first time we stored honey in the warm room prior to extracting, and kept the temp in there arou
    5 points
  9. I have looked at the MPI's reasons for the ban but I cannot find why it was fine a year ago and now it's not. They are basically saying that honey is an animal product and as such you must be licensed to exported it. Mark Goodwin has argued that honey is not an animal product but a plant product and should be treated as such. I can see his point and think it's probably time that beekeepers in New Zealand United to get honey out of the animal products and into plant products. Sugar for instance is a plant product despite being heavily modified and refined by upright apes. One of
    4 points
  10. we normally have some cross over but this year the kanuka seems to be having a heavier and earlier flowering than usual.
    4 points
  11. where we are it usually manuka and then into kanuka. this year the kanuka is already flowering and the manuka is just getting going.
    4 points
  12. Lemon honey never used to have any honey in it at all. Honey should be just honey. I also have no problem with people adding different products to honey but it absolutely should be labelled as such i.e. honey and raspberry or honey and vanilla. Creamed honey is generally the name given these days to crystallised honey . In the past it was only called creamed if it had been crystallised in a tank and then stirred and pumped to make it into a softer product. Raspberry honey is honey from the flowers of raspberries.
    4 points
  13. I agree with Trev , Oh Rainswept one. Patience girl, let the virgin get mated and lay some eggs and then check she's not a drone layer. Then perhaps leave her some more ..... and then about the week before Christmas even the brood in the two hives up.... and Hey presto, you'll have more honey than you know what to do with !
    4 points
  14. @Maru Hoaniwe also use it (air freshener)when removing a swarm. Spray it on the place you’ve taken the swarm from to mask the Queen smells!
    4 points
  15. James, I think that rata, a good smoothly granulated rata, is one of the finest honeys in the world. While I might personally think of it as priceless, I do hope you get the price you want...
    4 points
  16. Been feeding bees today ..... about 120 of them, five litres of thick C4 and placing shop cloths above the brood, under the queen excluder, honey box on top. Last month was the starving month ..... we lost 14 hives on the Dew, starved out because we were too busy placing bees into the mother load ..... but it is what it is , we have nucs to cover but they won't make a crop, but at $4/kg I'm not to concerned at the loss of income. It's more the principle of the matter ..... having four live hives on a pallet ..... anal thinking , but there yah go ... it's all about the image. We als
    3 points
  17. I just harvested some if you’re interested. Ph number in profile. And I’m in chch
    3 points
  18. Try as I may I cannot understand why with no change in the law it has become a illegal to post honey overseas. I had several very disappointed customers today at the farmers market. I don't know a lot about what has happened but as far as I can see it is because of a ruling from MPI. It is way past time beekeepers stop being pushed around by bureaucrats with no idea of reality and the damage they cause and this is by no means the only situation where gross stupidity from people that are supposed to be helping the beekeeping industry have caused immeasurable harm. You can take ho
    3 points
  19. Most beekeepers have public liability, and hopefully professional indemnity. BUT, if something were to happen that OSH deemed you could have prevented or was in some way your fault, the beekeepers insurance might pay out the beekeeper, but then go after you for the money. However the reality is that if everybody decided it wasn't worth the risk, there would not be a lot of places to put beehives. To comply with OSH you need to assess risks to the beekeeper, and then take all practicle steps to mitigate or minimise them. You need to have paperwork, and it would pay to ch
    3 points
  20. Beekeepers and Beehive owners. I have not heard this comparison.I now have a 'polite'name for those that really should not be allowed bees. They make me sick.
    3 points
  21. Yes. There are several ways to deal with the problem but that is one. A suggestion, don't shake them all out at once, just a few frames a day for several days so you won't get overwhelming numbers arriving at the queenright hive at the same time. But try to get them shaken within a week or so. Then you can add the combs of drone brood back to the hive so the bees can clean them up. To know if it's laying workers or a drone laying queen, look at the eggs. A drone laying queen will still lay normally, one egg bottom centre of each cell. Laying workers there will be many e
    3 points
  22. LOLA ..... One is too many. I tend to forget and move on .... it’s less destructive... and of course , the world is round and what goes around comes around.
    3 points
  23. This comes from 1954. I think there are photos of both beekeepers in subsequent beekeeping magazines...
    3 points
  24. It is maybe lot different than your area ( climate, different bee lineages), but all beeks I know here use qe with entrance. It has some disadvantages as other people mentioned above, but I believe honey box is filling faster ( which is crucial to us, due to short intensive forages we have). Also mentioned above if drones are trapped above, that can make a lot of problems when they try to get out or die above. Some disadvantages as occurring odd queen above qe, well we turn into split or remove it and have some extra brood on the cost of honey. Also when changing queens, some - even me sometim
    3 points
  25. Yes, @Goran, know both things you mention. My grandmother used to make the syrup with the young tips of spruce, layered with honey and we all got it when we had a cold. Except we kids liked it so much it often was gone before the cold season came along....The dandelion concoction was less common, it could also be made with honey instead of sugar, but nowhere near as nice....
    3 points
  26. You'll be surprised how they can manage to get mated in bad weather. just give things a wee bit more time and don't move anything till it's definately past the mating window for the queen, that is going to be the safest option and the one with the most odds of good results this season. Not 100% odds, but better odds than any other option.
    3 points
  27. Yep, like a helmet, or chaps, or an airbag.
    3 points
  28. Not exactly the way I see it. The high value was achieved by the UMF factor, but the industry insisted to market it as Manuka. Should have been marketed on UMF. Much easier to comply with. The insistence to market on "Manuka" caused the industry to come off the rails and the government had to step in. Just my opinion!
    3 points
  29. Yeah , feel for you John . One man's laziness two years ago cost us a whole heap of work. I remember once when I was deputised to take Jasper Bray around the bees we were talking about AFB , I still recall the sadness in his voice when recalling they ended up burning the whole yard. Somedays it makes you just so mad at other peoples incompetence.
    3 points
  30. Up until about 1950, NZ beekeepers continued to try out 'remedies' for AFB... The methods almost always involved shaking hives off the frames, sometimes multiple times, to try to use up the last of their stores. Equipment was variously scorched, boiled and disinfected, using the methods and beliefs that were common. It wasn't until about 1950 that (1) 'shook swarming', shaking bees off the combs to treat for AFB and (2) a serious attempt to reduce the risk created by abandoned or neglected apiaries. Even with the calls by the industry at the time, the Dept of Agricult
    2 points
  31. 2 points
  32. It's all about good decisions, throwing good after bad or very keen to save a hive with frames from a strong hive with brood to spare. Just that there are lots of options, and that laying workers are uncommon as we keep a close eye on the queenright status, and act before workers start laying. Or get caught out being so clever !
    2 points
  33. Interesting Nikki, yes there has been a shift in the normal pattern here this season also.
    2 points
  34. When I have weak lw colony, I do shake out. But if I have decent lw, I give bf rather than shakeout. Less work and easier for me to do so. So far it was sufficient 2x bf to they return into normal. This way I don't have to take hive some 50 meters away, brush/shake all the frames, fork all the drone brood, think where all the surplus frames to " stick" or fear if stored wax moth will destroy. A lot here merged with newspaper and almost always they lost their queen, as they claimed to me. I never tried by myself, easier to learn by other's mistakes, than my own. The loss of few bf from ot
    2 points
  35. This method is talked about a lot on our side of the world. I tell folks it's a waste of time and brood. Instead of wasting 3 brood frames and 3 weeks on a laying worker, put those 3 frames in a nuc box together. Now you have a viable colony which can either raise a queen, or you can introduce one. Shake out the laying worker colony and put the box away leaving it's spot empty, use some of the drawn frames to finish populating the box you put the new nuc in. the bees you shook out will beg their way into any other colonies in the area. This method uses the same amount of resou
    2 points
  36. Nah, some can lead happy lives,and be shizzers the entire time. Never goes round. Karma?
    2 points
  37. I think the thing is , it’s a case of keeping a tidy backyard. You may not like the guys, but if their laidbackness has the potential to cause you a headache ..... I’d be helping them out. Besides, life’s too short to have too many enemies.
    2 points
  38. There is a lot of rubbish talked about entrances from people who have ideas that sound good but don't work out in practice. Hives don't need nearly as big an entrance as most people think and while they will use a top entrance so will robbers. Years ago we used to run a few big two queen hives and they could be 8 full depth boxes high and yet they still all went in the entrance at the bottom. Most of the time you will get away with a top entrance but I don't believe it is of any benefit.
    2 points
  39. You can't give over the counter medications unless you are medically trained to use them. You can stock them and allow the person to self administer. Worksafe instructions attached - medication in first aid kits page 11 Here's one for you. Worksafe use the following terminology My personal interpretation of that is: if there is a higher risk of anaphylactic shock you should provide an Epipen Again my personal interpretation is that "extra first aid equipment" could cover an epipen. WKS-17-First-aid-at-wor
    2 points
  40. @Grant what are the rules about administering drugs/medications to other people. As business owners I understand we cant give our staff panadol etc. When I was a Barnardos caregiver/ some long time ago, we werent allowed to give medications to children. I had one stung by a bee and only just made it to North shore hospital, begged his mum on the phone to let me give him antihistamine she did, but he was unconscious by the time I arrived.
    2 points
  41. Hey, we don't have that problem of overheating epipen down here, every cloud got a silver lining....we keep one in the glove box, if it's a really hot summer I'll put it in a chilly bag, easy. Luckily haven't needed it, but like it's been mentioned, I did need that bike helmet to safe my head a few years back, I needed a life jacket once and a seat belt on a couple of occasions. I also have an insurance for lots of things, even so I feel like I waste my money every year. And I agree with the old wive tales, there's lots of misinformation out there about allergic reactions. There's a lot more
    2 points
  42. Not you @Alastair. @tristan has replied with the appropriate suggesting of a correct deck mounting and the reasons for the said suggestions.
    2 points
  43. A truck driver got stung a few kms away from me today and collapsed, had to get helicoptered away, nearly an hour wait. Anyway, I had a visit asking if I had an EpiPen and said nah they're too expensive at 160 every six months and you have to order them at the pharmacy which means two trips into town, the guy should have one on him if its life threatening just like having diabetes, you should have insulin in your vehicle, if one of my family members was allergic I would have one but since I dont even know anyone who's allergic why should I spend hard earned money on such a poor season, I'
    2 points
  44. I split Reg’s hives the other day. They live opposite the Glentunnel store and keep his garden humming. I Had a couple of spare queens , so grabbed a pie.... and crscked into it. I was surprised at the smount of pollen in the pollen traps, as I had opened them up to let the bees keep most of the pollen a while ago. Found the old queens and put them on new bottom boards to the back of the hives with most of the brood. Popped the queens in the original box with four frames of brood and a squirt of air freshner to disguise the pheremone. Doubled my numbers.... money for j
    2 points
  45. Just sitting back havin a beer and lookin out window above woolshed roof on hillside in bush is a reddish lookin tree. A look through binoculars and its a Southern Rata in full bloom. A look around and across lake is two more bright red trees.. The earliest ive seen in the eight years ive been here.
    2 points
  46. Yes. No flexibility. Do the 12 hour shift or zilch. And the "Seasonal" status is crap. Lyn wanted a job share or part time, it was so difficult to sort out. So she worked until it broke her. The handful of overseas back packers accepted the conditions, but were surprised that locals did too. No way they would work that way in their own country.
    2 points
  47. Went very well. Settled weather, bees looking good, not stuck. Wet a few times. Orchardists are reserved, waiting to see how the fruit set develops. Big G3 crop, See how they squeel getting the crop picked and freighting it. Lots of overseas seasonal workers not coming back. My wife worked at a pack shed during lockdown. Improving conditions be a great start! Being more flexible, like job share or part time be great to encourage kiwis to the factory floor.
    2 points
  48. absolutly. golden rule is "don't let hives die from afb". if you can't do that then you should not be beekeeping.
    2 points
  49. Back to the same apiary today and another hive with one cell infected. Every time I find an AFB it's pretty much a whole day wasted by the time I pick it up and burn it. This one also has close to a box of honey so I will need a deeper bigger hole this time. This is hive number seven. One idiots carelessness and the cost to other beekeepers is pretty staggering. I have been inspecting two frames in each brood box every time I visit. You could ask why I don't do a full brood inspection and I would reply that it's partly a matter of time and also to keep robbing down which i
    2 points
  50. We used to have everything contract extracted. It seemed easy, but the reality was it was extra time transporting boxes there and back, and then we had to wait in line for our turn .... So we put our own plant in. It started with a hot top and hand knife and two four frame extractors that gravity fed into a sump tank in the floor of the big shed where we stored boxes and trucks.. The honey was then pumped into drums. The new regs came in and we needed a dedicated room, and the four frame painted extractors went to the museum in the roof. We bought
    2 points
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