Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 23/11/20 in all areas

  1. I've put some resources up, including a free online training program at
    8 points
  2. EpiPen costs 120 and lasts in excess of 12 months usually. That's nothing near the 320 you estimated. You order them online from Queenstown with free nationwide delivery, which means no trips into town. Additionally ACC would reimburse you had you used it on the guy who was choppered out, or anyone else. Not everyone has a history of being allergic. You could have had 200 stings before with nothing and sting 201 causes a reaction with no prior history. However it's turning into an interesting thread now because it's highlighting the sheer lack of
    7 points
  3. If you do find out, first thing to do is send them an invoice for damages. Make it realistic - i.e. fair values but make it complete, travel, time etc cost of digging hole.... At this point you have established a cost. The beekeeper may actually decide to pay the bill. I have experienced this. If they don't, they are now very aware of the cost to someone else that their actions (or lack of) have caused. At this point if they refuse to pay, you can take them to the disputes tribunal. The cost is low, tribunal is less like a court and more like an arbitration. Depending on how
    6 points
  4. ???Young travelers. We don't have any and we are absolutely loving it. The Selwyn District Council riverbed camping grounds are the nearest to ChCh airport, and it is great just to see NZers using them (for once, without heaps of dunny paper deposited with excrement by young travellers on riverbanks). The refuse on the side of roads (mattreses, cooking gear, china, 2 minute noodle packs) previously ditched between Leeston and ChCh Airport, prior to returning the rental van tidy and clean, is no longer evident. One less expense for ratepayers to fork out, and a wonderful opportunity for our
    6 points
  5. I went to an extra ordinary meeting this afternoon , called by Mountain River , to whome we sell our venison weaner deer. The meeting had nothing to do with honey, but was quite interesting in that it has everything to do with marketing honey. Back in the autumn we didn't buy weaner deer to take through the winter and fatten as the writing was on the wall that with Covid the market was gonna be pretty tough this time of year. No kidding. The venison market in the US, where most of our produce goes has fallen off 80%. The gist of the meeting was that if we co
    5 points
  6. If I was moving up to 500 colonies, I would want the Cowan 28 extractor with the Silver Queen uncapper. We currently have no plans to move up to that sort of scale and have built our extracting around a Mann Lake 18 frame radial unit. The other bit we did when we built our new honey shed, we put in a small room well insulated for storing honey prior to extracting. We call it the 'warm room', but in fact it's more like a 'warm closet', set up to hold 100 supers max. This year was the first time we stored honey in the warm room prior to extracting, and kept the temp in there arou
    5 points
  7. After you posted about this a few months ago Goran, I made a honey and kawakawa mix. (Kawakawa is a native NZ plant that Maori believe to be very healthy and a treatment for sickness). It did work, but tastes very bitter so I don't think it will be a commercial seller. Interestingly the honey has not granulated, stayed totally liquid. Whereas the exact same honey that does not have kawakawa, all granulated quite some time ago. It's in the pantry and will be getting used if anyone here gets sick .
    4 points
  8. Anaphylaxis (an-a-fi-LAK-sis) is a serious allergic response that often involves swelling, hives, lowered blood pressure and in severe cases, shock. If anaphylactic shock isn't treated immediately, it can be fatal. A major difference between anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions is that anaphylaxis typically involves more than one system of the body. Symptoms usually start within 5 to 30 minutes of coming into contact with an allergen to which an individual is allergic. In some cases, however, it may take more than an hour to notice anaphylactic symptoms.
    4 points
  9. I agree with Trev , Oh Rainswept one. Patience girl, let the virgin get mated and lay some eggs and then check she's not a drone layer. Then perhaps leave her some more ..... and then about the week before Christmas even the brood in the two hives up.... and Hey presto, you'll have more honey than you know what to do with !
    4 points
  10. @Maru Hoaniwe also use it (air freshener)when removing a swarm. Spray it on the place you’ve taken the swarm from to mask the Queen smells!
    4 points
  11. James, I think that rata, a good smoothly granulated rata, is one of the finest honeys in the world. While I might personally think of it as priceless, I do hope you get the price you want...
    4 points
  12. What absolute complete and utter crap. Your primary first aid response is ABC Airway Breathing Circulation Anaphylaxis is an acute, potentially life-threatening systemic allergic reaction. Other than the upper airway obstruction (swelling), cardiovascular collapse (low blood pressure) is the second most life-threatening anaphylactic reaction and both require urgent treatment. So as you can see, if the patient is having upper airway obstruction, their airway will be compromised. If they cannot breathe - they die. Then their bp drops affecting
    4 points
  13. It is maybe lot different than your area ( climate, different bee lineages), but all beeks I know here use qe with entrance. It has some disadvantages as other people mentioned above, but I believe honey box is filling faster ( which is crucial to us, due to short intensive forages we have). Also mentioned above if drones are trapped above, that can make a lot of problems when they try to get out or die above. Some disadvantages as occurring odd queen above qe, well we turn into split or remove it and have some extra brood on the cost of honey. Also when changing queens, some - even me sometim
    3 points
  14. Yes, @Goran, know both things you mention. My grandmother used to make the syrup with the young tips of spruce, layered with honey and we all got it when we had a cold. Except we kids liked it so much it often was gone before the cold season came along....The dandelion concoction was less common, it could also be made with honey instead of sugar, but nowhere near as nice....
    3 points
  15. Lemon honey never used to have any honey in it at all. Honey should be just honey. I also have no problem with people adding different products to honey but it absolutely should be labelled as such i.e. honey and raspberry or honey and vanilla. Creamed honey is generally the name given these days to crystallised honey . In the past it was only called creamed if it had been crystallised in a tank and then stirred and pumped to make it into a softer product. Raspberry honey is honey from the flowers of raspberries.
    3 points
  16. You'll be surprised how they can manage to get mated in bad weather. just give things a wee bit more time and don't move anything till it's definately past the mating window for the queen, that is going to be the safest option and the one with the most odds of good results this season. Not 100% odds, but better odds than any other option.
    3 points
  17. Yep, like a helmet, or chaps, or an airbag.
    3 points
  18. Not exactly the way I see it. The high value was achieved by the UMF factor, but the industry insisted to market it as Manuka. Should have been marketed on UMF. Much easier to comply with. The insistence to market on "Manuka" caused the industry to come off the rails and the government had to step in. Just my opinion!
    3 points
  19. Back to the same apiary today and another hive with one cell infected. Every time I find an AFB it's pretty much a whole day wasted by the time I pick it up and burn it. This one also has close to a box of honey so I will need a deeper bigger hole this time. This is hive number seven. One idiots carelessness and the cost to other beekeepers is pretty staggering. I have been inspecting two frames in each brood box every time I visit. You could ask why I don't do a full brood inspection and I would reply that it's partly a matter of time and also to keep robbing down which i
    3 points
  20. We used to have everything contract extracted. It seemed easy, but the reality was it was extra time transporting boxes there and back, and then we had to wait in line for our turn .... So we put our own plant in. It started with a hot top and hand knife and two four frame extractors that gravity fed into a sump tank in the floor of the big shed where we stored boxes and trucks.. The honey was then pumped into drums. The new regs came in and we needed a dedicated room, and the four frame painted extractors went to the museum in the roof. We bought
    3 points
  21. Best to wait and see what happens.
    3 points
  22. My dream honey house would be in another country where they didn't have so many stupid rules. Other than that I would have 2 eight frame tangential Extractors like we used to have years ago and hand planes but they would be electrically heated rather than the steam ones we used to have. I would probably settle for a spinner for removing the wax but I would have a good look around to see what's available. The old extractors were a lot gentler on the frames and were almost indestructible and you had very little downtime. Hand planes are a lot kinder on the frames and also have a lot l
    3 points
  23. I had a copy of this book but lent it to someone. From memory it covered most things but was a bit precious about things like sterile conditions and damp tea towels to protect freshly grafted cells. My father always grafted with the sun over his right shoulder while sitting on an upturned bee box, out in the paddock. You don't need all the bells and whistles.
    3 points
  24. Weather plays a huge part in mating success, autumn weather is much more settled and a great time for you to have a crack at it I’m sure you will find it very enjoyable, there are many ways to achieve your goal. My queen raising in spring is mainly due to needing income to fund any increase which generally comes in autumn/winter. requeening is very high on my priority list, actually it’s second after Varroa control. a young vigorous queen is like the fresh engine of a race car..
    3 points
  25. Supermarket scandal sees honey 'bulked out with cheap sugar syrups' | Daily Mail Online WWW.DAILYMAIL.CO.UK Tests conducted on own-brand honeys from Co-op, Tesco, Sainsbury's and Asda suggest they have been bulked out with cheap syrups made from rice and corn - without the retailers' knowledge. But the price comparisons are interesting.
    3 points
  26. Another method which I have used successfully is to turn off the laying workers by giving a series of frames with open brood which produces a pheromone with the required effect. One a week until workers stop laying (usually 2-3 doses) and it boosts the hive with brood as it hatches, then give a cell or queen when it is safe, or combine with a queen right hive. This does take time and uses resources, but very interesting for a hobby beekeeper.
    2 points
  27. LOLA ..... One is too many. I tend to forget and move on .... it’s less destructive... and of course , the world is round and what goes around comes around.
    2 points
  28. This year the TECT Park About the Park - TECT Park WWW.TECTPARK.CO.NZ had an open day for its 10th anniversary. They had the 4 wheel drive club taking kids (young and old) for rides through a long course, ponies, face painting, Santa arrived in a chopper, there were buses running nonstop between the different areas of the park from paint ball to model planes and to clay shooting. All the park user groups were represented and of course that includes us. In the Fun zone with bouncy castles, music stage, we had a gazebo beside story time and face painting with a
    2 points
  29. Thanks Chris, over at the apiary we hadn't a clue what was going on! Far from the Madd(in)ing Crowd and no romance...
    2 points
  30. sadly not uncommon. one of the AFB outbreaks a few years back was this sort of situation (tho at least they sold the honey). they employed a beek to run the hives who seamed to have spread afb through them. a lot went up in smoke instead of being sold. they need to talk to local outfits, volunteers, and get a plan into gear. probably not a bad idea to keep @AFB PMP Management Agency in the loop they may know people who can help. this is not about saving the business at all, its simply stopping it from damaging everyone around them. they will need to sell what hi
    2 points
  31. There is a lot of rubbish talked about entrances from people who have ideas that sound good but don't work out in practice. Hives don't need nearly as big an entrance as most people think and while they will use a top entrance so will robbers. Years ago we used to run a few big two queen hives and they could be 8 full depth boxes high and yet they still all went in the entrance at the bottom. Most of the time you will get away with a top entrance but I don't believe it is of any benefit.
    2 points
  32. Red Cross First Aid manual is available free of charge by all accounts New_Zealand_Red_Cross_Essential_First_Aid_Manual03072020.pdf
    2 points
  33. @Grant what are the rules about administering drugs/medications to other people. As business owners I understand we cant give our staff panadol etc. When I was a Barnardos caregiver/ some long time ago, we werent allowed to give medications to children. I had one stung by a bee and only just made it to North shore hospital, begged his mum on the phone to let me give him antihistamine she did, but he was unconscious by the time I arrived.
    2 points
  34. Hey, we don't have that problem of overheating epipen down here, every cloud got a silver lining....we keep one in the glove box, if it's a really hot summer I'll put it in a chilly bag, easy. Luckily haven't needed it, but like it's been mentioned, I did need that bike helmet to safe my head a few years back, I needed a life jacket once and a seat belt on a couple of occasions. I also have an insurance for lots of things, even so I feel like I waste my money every year. And I agree with the old wive tales, there's lots of misinformation out there about allergic reactions. There's a lot more
    2 points
  35. Not you @Alastair. @tristan has replied with the appropriate suggesting of a correct deck mounting and the reasons for the said suggestions.
    2 points
  36. i have one on a hive at home (tho its bottom of the excluder rather than the top). it rarely get used. the one thing its actually good for is for having dual queen hives. when i had the sick hives it was very handy to join the hives together with that excluder. one other issue with top entrances is queens coming back and going in the wrong entrance.
    2 points
  37. Actually in person Tristan is the nicest ever guy. He is definately an engineering freak, but that is what I was after when I visited him, I greatly appreciated his advice, he is very knowledgeable. In your bottom pic, see the second mount in is right under the beam of the deck. No worries from downwards pressure. But the mounting at the back is not over the mounting, it is in such a way that downwards pressure plus some heavy loads and bumpy rides could put some leverage on it and possible eventual collapse. I think that is what Tristan was referring to, and good point, if it was
    2 points
  38. A truck driver got stung a few kms away from me today and collapsed, had to get helicoptered away, nearly an hour wait. Anyway, I had a visit asking if I had an EpiPen and said nah they're too expensive at 160 every six months and you have to order them at the pharmacy which means two trips into town, the guy should have one on him if its life threatening just like having diabetes, you should have insulin in your vehicle, if one of my family members was allergic I would have one but since I dont even know anyone who's allergic why should I spend hard earned money on such a poor season, I'
    2 points
  39. Just sitting back havin a beer and lookin out window above woolshed roof on hillside in bush is a reddish lookin tree. A look through binoculars and its a Southern Rata in full bloom. A look around and across lake is two more bright red trees.. The earliest ive seen in the eight years ive been here.
    2 points
  40. Yes. No flexibility. Do the 12 hour shift or zilch. And the "Seasonal" status is crap. Lyn wanted a job share or part time, it was so difficult to sort out. So she worked until it broke her. The handful of overseas back packers accepted the conditions, but were surprised that locals did too. No way they would work that way in their own country.
    2 points
  41. Went very well. Settled weather, bees looking good, not stuck. Wet a few times. Orchardists are reserved, waiting to see how the fruit set develops. Big G3 crop, See how they squeel getting the crop picked and freighting it. Lots of overseas seasonal workers not coming back. My wife worked at a pack shed during lockdown. Improving conditions be a great start! Being more flexible, like job share or part time be great to encourage kiwis to the factory floor.
    2 points
  42. We get our honey from Natural Sugars. I rang the lovely girl today to order a tonne of raw, as watching Blue Skies the next couple of weeks are gonna be up and down until mid December, when it settles for a few weeks, and January is looking messy. Real messy. Karl rang back a few hours later to say there were only two pallets of raw in the South Island, down in Dunedin. He went on to say shipping logistics were real and the next lot was on the water and might be here by the end of December. So I ordered a tonne of white and will give hungry hives a slurp sh
    2 points
  43. Yeah , feel for you John . One man's laziness two years ago cost us a whole heap of work. I remember once when I was deputised to take Jasper Bray around the bees we were talking about AFB , I still recall the sadness in his voice when recalling they ended up burning the whole yard. Somedays it makes you just so mad at other peoples incompetence.
    2 points
  44. Just stop please. You followed up your initial comment because I happened to give you a thumbs down. You maybe a competent beekeeper, but now you're crossing into my territory and your comments, if taken out of context, could lead to someone dying because the person in a position to help paused or delayed giving adrenaline when needed, due to misguided comments about high blood pressure. This is not a factor in the event of an anaphylactic reaction
    2 points
  45. absolutly. golden rule is "don't let hives die from afb". if you can't do that then you should not be beekeeping.
    2 points
  46. Sorry long. Interesting morning for me... O.K. Five Queens down to three? Had big winds around here. Did AS on 7th. Then the hive that I took the split off also swarmed. ( Did I catch it back?) No sign of eggs yet on these two hives. Maybe just a tad too early. Fingers crossed. If not I will have to make two blue dot Queens. Checked the swarm hive. Had a play....Manipulated frames still contemplating stealing a 3/4 box back? ( had given them 2 x 3/4 then slotted an unwanted FD in the middle for them to move into to save my gear as I was running out) Ended up pu
    2 points
  47. i think you are right. the virgin must be coming up to 2 weeks old . there is not much chance of her mating in the next few days , not till the migrants arrive. they are due any day. but the tracks are so wet it will be a big ask to drive up them. if she turns into a drone layer i will just have to find and dispatch her .
    2 points
  48. @Alastairi remember my mate who had two allergic sons practicing on an orange in the early 90s. There’s more allergic to bee stings than you’d think. Pity I didn’t hear about the epipen project it I’d have been keen.
    2 points
  49. About queens.. In contrary of many here used to to. I produce the queens for me after the swarm season. During the season I use the qe with entrance. Sometimes occur in super odd new queen, sometimes it can be I shift up unnoticed some young brood but in some cases I think it come as stranded from other colonies during mating flights. So occasionally I have extra brood afterward or split, whatever I choose. Such queens I try not to leave, due to uncertain origin or quality ( removing at place or later if I make split). Also some friends had problems when odd queen fly in their cell raisers and
    2 points
This leaderboard is set to Auckland/GMT+13:00
×
×
  • Create New...