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  1. I have just watched the big expose on TV one about roundup in manuka honey. Man they must be short of news to put on such a anti roundup biased piece of garbage. No mention of other honey types which if they come from pasture you would expect to have higher residues and no mention about residues found in meat or vegetables or anything else we eat. End result will be a drop in honey sales for no practical good. I'm not a huge fan of roundup but it is a legal product used very extensively in New Zealand farming and beekeepers can't avoid it. All right they did mention that beekeepers could
    12 points
  2. It appears even Crims can be good guys. Our landi was delivered back to our mechanics today. Whoever dropped it off just parked it up and walked away without saying anything. @jamesc how did you get on with your gates.
    10 points
  3. What a blatant piece of advertising from purity to the detriment of every beekeeper in New Zealand. As for some of the crap from the other beekeeper . Saying that hives have died from roundup poisoning is unbelievable. Hives do get killed by operators spraying gorse but it is not roundup. Poisonings of this type are almost invariably caused by organo- silicate surfactants which the powers that be refuse to label as an insecticide because it's a sticking agent despite the fact that it is lethal to bees wet or dry. We now have the general public thinking our honey is poisonous (except for
    9 points
  4. First day seriously working bees today after a nearly 4 month break, always interesting to see how they have fared over winter. During the day i found 3 deadouts, best I could tell one due to mites and 2 went queenless. Some hives weak some hives strong. But had to take a pic of this one, freakish. It was a big strong hive that did extra well last season plus provided several 2 kg packages of bees to be sold, and has carried on the same. Double brood box absolutely choca with bees. Most hives only a fraction of this many bees I should add.
    8 points
  5. *basis My submission is as below, as you will see I did use some of the points raised by you guys.. (thanks). It will probably not result in anything but I do think that the more people who make a complaint that it will make them think more carefully in future if they know they are going to cause themselves extra paperwork. Given the brevity of my emails I deserve an award for stopping at point 10... Programme: TV1 News Date of broadcast: 26,27 July 2020 Time of broadcast: 6pm Channel: TVNZ 1 The Programme Standards I beli
    8 points
  6. They say there is a first time for everything. I have made an official complaint about the two news items and encourage others to follow suit. I have grown increasingly tired over the years of seeing beekeeping(news) stories that have just been taken word for word from someone with their own agenda . Mostly they have been pointless bits of fluff that do nothing but misinform the general public and raise my blood pressure but this last effort !. A month in the making! You would think even a television journalist would realise they were being led round with a ring in their nose by that
    8 points
  7. Whilst we're being clear, it would be great if you could clarify yours and your company's position on the following: What are your limits of detection for glyphosate? Who is the independent organisation that offers you certification for being "Glyphosate Free"? To what international standard is this measured against? It's all well and good to say that you didn't initiate this, but there seems to be a lot of misinformation floating around and it's very convenient that you seem to end up at the centre of it weighing in, especially when you insinuate such scaremo
    8 points
  8. Well hot darn diggity dog .... our local cop is a gem . Acting on a tipoff , he made an arrest of a gate thief .Sounds like the beginning of a joke, but no.
    7 points
  9. Done 51 hives today, only one mite wash that came back with nill mites from a 350 bee sample then back home for a tutu on my new mean machine, just gotta set up the dualies then off for a test run, still got a few small sites to shift, I may only just get through to next season but atleast I got the last 2 machines I needed this season even if they aren't new
    7 points
  10. Just to let you all know I have been appointed onto the AFB Board as the APINZ Board member rep.
    7 points
  11. I am surprised they are using UMF 5, UMF 15 is a lot more effective for that sort of work. A study I read some years ago said that if a honey is used that effectively kills invading bacteria at the wound, the healing is also twice as quick because the wound is kept wet instead of scabbing, and there is also less scaring. I have my own success story to tell about honey, an elderly neighbour got an eye infection, went to the doctor and was given a course of antibiotics. However at the end of the course his eye was no better. The guy had puss coming out of his eye and was
    7 points
  12. My daughter Has a leg ulcer that’s being treated at the local doctors office. I was pretty impressed when the nurse asked her if she would be OK with having Manuka honey put on it.
    6 points
  13. Way back in 1996 it was a bad year for the honey crop, too cold if I remember right. So I didn't shift my hives to the high country, kept them all on the Taieri Plains. It was a hard season for the bees, but they did get Kanuka honey in. Not a lot, only about 1800 kgs. Once it was creamed and packed t was being sold through a local health food shop in 500g jars. One day I was called by the shop owner to fulfill an unusually large order, upon questioning her I discovered that a nearby breeder of race horses had been treating a large infected wound on one of his prize stallions. I arranged to pe
    6 points
  14. Life, we are told, is all about balance. Work, family , other stuff .... These days I get a big yawn reading and watching about honey ..... Manuka Honey, and how the industry is thriving. Rather than complain, perhaps TV one would do an article on the not so rosy side of Beekeeping ..... the business collapses, redundancies, layoffs, overstocking, hive site rentals, disease breakouts and minefield of beaurocratic rigmarole just to sell the stuff. Just a thought as we try to get enthused to go and crack lids and jump start trucks with flat batteries.
    6 points
  15. Even the Canterbury beekeeper with 'you cant work out what's wrong with them and they don't get better'. That's not Roundup on the gorse or even the stickers. The bees would be dead on the baseboard or outside the hive. It can accentuate the effects of nosemas though Reminds me of a number of beekeepers in the media who blamed a new pathogen we found back 2015 or so, for their hive losses. They never got their bees tested but blamed the new pathogen nonetheless
    6 points
  16. See the attached PDF for a good summary from regulatory and governmental agencies from around the World on Glyphosate, including the controversial IARC determination in 2015. Links in the document to the original source from the various agencies including our own NZEPA's one in 2016. "IARC placed glyphosate in its hazard category "Group 2A: probably carcinogenic to humans” along with red meat, hot beverages, and working as a barber. The evidence on carcinogenicity was less robust than for agents such as bacon, salted fish, oral contraceptives and wine." GlyphosateInfographic_GLP-
    6 points
  17. Some misinformation in the article. First off, the beekeeper complaining that as soon as the gorse around the corner is sprayed (implying roundup), all his hives die. "Nothing you can do" he said. Then how come I spray the grass around my hives with roundup, get it on the landing board and on the bees in the process, and no visible damage to the bees at all. Second, it showed a shot of dead gorse, claiming it had been sprayed with roundup. It was sprayed with something else, not roundup. How do I know? The grass around the gorse was fine. If roundup had been used
    6 points
  18. The little truck that could.
    6 points
  19. This was a mistake that should have been quickly and quietly fixed in-house. It has detracted from the good work that has been going on and overall I think both the board and the management team have been doing a really good job with a lot of new initiatives that have and will reduce the incidence of AFB. I would still like the board to be made up of elected members rather than appointed members. The current process leaves many beekeepers feeling disenfranchised.
    6 points
  20. South Island season has kicked off this month most of us will be deep into the brood with spring clean outs and a state of the nation round.. how’s the hive health looking and what treatments were used pre winter? I ran Ox staples full time since 2017 but last autumn used Bayvarol as found ox over winter had a hit and miss result. So far the only mites/damage I’ve seen was purely operator error following a severe operator injury, OX spring treatments will go in end of this month and run through till March 21 except for during the cashcrop.. how’s your hive health/ strength and tho
    5 points
  21. If you’re a gardener (aren’t all beekeepers?) you’ll know a little about what biologists call the ‘stress induced flowering response’. As a lad some forty-something years ago I think I knew that, even if scientists have just got around to studying it in the last decade. You know, stop watering whatever it is, or provide a bit of a temperature shock, and it’ll burst into flower. We already knew that right? We suppose plants can survive as a species if they flower and produce seeds, producing the next generation although they themselves cannot adapt to unfavourable environmental conditions. The
    5 points
  22. Something else, most of the hives had drone brood, which is earlier than usual. Visible as I cracked boxes apart. But the interesting thing was there were larvae, up to full sized, point of being capped, but no pupae, not even one. Exactly the same maximum age, in each hive that had them. All the hives must have started on exactly the same day. Got to wonder how they knew, what was the signal? Bees are interesting things .
    5 points
  23. Nice try at putting a positive spin on the News Story, and your involvement in it. You were either very foolish, or very self-serving to let yourself get involved. There can be no positive spin put on that story- it was damaging, and has come at a time when we can least afford Own Goals.
    5 points
  24. I don't normally need to raise any queens in the spring and if I do I wouldn't start before mid September. It's an interesting little micro environment where I live. Absolutely amazing for mating the odd Queen but completely useless for honey production. If it is warm enough they get a gum flow most of the winter but they do lose a lot of bees because of it and tend to come through pretty weak. Strong hives tend to lose about half their bees over the winter and weak hives tend to die out. I think it is partly losing flying bees when the sun goes behind a cloud and partly Nosema brought on by
    5 points
  25. if anyone didn't like the article on TVNZ then there is a complaints process, that appears to be quite easy and quick to fill out. If everyone who disputes the facts likes to do something constructive, here it is: Making a Formal Complaint TVNZ.CO.NZ
    5 points
  26. It can be done, one is all I started with. However it is often advised to start with two, so that if some disaster happens to one of them, it can be re-colonized from the other one. For a skilled beekeeper it is usually more cost effective to build one yourself, however for a brand new beekeeper there is some knowledge required to start from scratch and it may be better to buy a complete pre existing hive. The price of honey has collapsed over the last couple of years, so some beekeepers are selling off hives cheaply, if you shop around a while you will probably get one a
    5 points
  27. Yes, indeed. The powers of compulsory inspection of beehives on private land go back to the Apiaries Act 1906. And yes, it is a serious power, and one that the Govt does not let loose of easily. The ability to enter onto private land to inspect beehives for AFB is one of the essential powers of the AFB PMP if AFB is to be eliminated, I would suggest...
    5 points
  28. I may be completely wrong on this Nick but my understanding is that under the AFB PMP destruction can only be ordered on hives that have clinical symptoms of AFB. It appears that the management agency has been using other legislation to order the destruction of stored gear with a high likelihood of being infected with AFB. Depending on how you see things this is either a clever use of legislation to help clean up AFB in outfits that are hopelessly compromised by their own incompetence or an attack on individual beekeepers rights and who are they going to target next. Given the numb
    5 points
  29. Most of them still had plenty of bees but I wont know until the next time I check them if some of the queens have dround, there were heavy losses in a few but the pallets pretty much saved them they were all still strapped together, thankfully it was only 2 pallets because I had shifted the other 4 away.
    5 points
  30. It seems to me a lot of acquisitions Comvita has made over the past 10 years or so haven’t stayed around long before being closed or written down to next to nothing . Must be great to have investors to keep you propped up no matter how bad your business decisions have been.
    5 points
  31. I agree, went through a site today below the mountain, dew is really stimulating them.. majority of the 28 have drone brood between the brood boxes, slabs of healthy brood and fresh white wax glueing them up.. surprised to see them this advanced with Queen cups built in the strongest.. I’ll pull the grunty ones out and use them as my cell raisers. Was 2 colonies here that missed the autumn varroa treatment somehow.. both have visible mites and were given meds and emerging brood to aid recovery. Definately too early for me to have this strength. They will be split into my wea
    4 points
  32. In the past we have been told that everything is safe from x-rays to licking your paintbrush when painting luminescent dials on watches. Agent orange was harmless along with thalidomide, DDT, lead in petrol, lead in paint, asbestos,tobacco, giving women the vote et cetera. Couple this with the fact that man is just a superstitious monkey who is still afraid of the dark , the bogeyman and Democrats and you end up with a large percentage of the population who will believe anything they are told. Even those who try and be rational will have that little doubt in their head after watching
    4 points
  33. Agree... I have also lodged a complaint and asked if the reporter looked into the credibility of his interviewees who seem to be at the centre of the debacle. Just a big misleading, marketing ploy which ended up with free advertising for the betterment of one brand. I also asked if there was any research at all undertaken into the "Glyphosate Free" claims that were made by said brand or who issued the "independent certification" that they state on the website as, from what I can see on the website, is that there is very little information other than outrageous claims, scaremongering statements
    4 points
  34. so why would a towny reporter be interested in glyphosate in honey ? how would he even know such a thing even existed ? of all the contaminants in all our different foods why did he do an article on glyphosate in honey ? in my opinion it wasn’t something he thought up himself, someone in the know has whispered in his ear. knowing who would answer the question of why . Could be labs wanting even more of our dollars than they already get. Could be companies like Puriti who make a big deal out of testing it’s going to be someone with an agenda and someone who
    4 points
  35. Adam. I'm glad you didn't initiate the story but purity does come across as cheering it on. I know when you do this sort of thing you have no control over editing and hindsight is a wonderful thing but every beekeeper and packer in the country should have steered as far away from this thing as they possibly could of.
    4 points
  36. Just to be clear. Neither Midlands or Myself initiated the story. I do not believe any company involved in either of the Sunday or Monday segments initiated the article either. TV1 formulated the article based on information from the MPI. TV1 will have approached multiple companies and organisations for comment and or response.
    4 points
  37. The Management Agency directs the affected beekeepers to burn used supers when there is high levels of AFB as described above AND the beekeeper has not complied with the traceability requirements that he/she agreed to in their DECA. If the affected beekeepers had maintained the traceability of their gear as they agreed in their DECA it would be relatively straight forward to differentiate which gear came from infected hives and which gear came from uninfected hives....and in this situation the Management Agency would only direct the beekeeper to burn gear from infected beehives.
    4 points
  38. When we used the staples in Winter our hives were exactly like yours really damp and the poor ones never recovered. This Autumn we reverted back to Bayvarol and the hives are looking awesome.
    4 points
  39. For myself I would use table grade in preference to medicinal Manuka and I would rate manuka comb honey as a bit better again. It's not just the UMF factor that makes honey an effective wound dressing.
    4 points
  40. Imagine the levels of AFB in a ropy larva. Now imagine those same levels (or higher) seen from a teaspoon of wax bits on the floor. Or a few pieces of debris from supers. No brood this no clinical signs. What do you do ?
    4 points
  41. My personal feeling which I have stated before is that board members should be elected, not appointed. I did try unsuccessfully to get on the board a few years ago. I am a member of both organisations and far more interested in how existing methods and new technology can be used to further the goal of elimination than in any political machinations.
    4 points
  42. The concept of "needs someone or a group to keep it in check" strikes to the heart of it, IMHO. This is a PMP developed by beekeepers for beekeepers. It was not imposed from 'the outside'. My understanding is that APINZ has offered NZ Beekeeping Inc the opportunity to have someone join the Mgmt Agency Board. If NZ Beekeeping Inc is serious about a positive contribution to the elimination of AFB, surely this should be a step forward?
    4 points
  43. The AFB PMP now has an in-house AP1 which is a huge change from only having government employees in the role. The decision to do this has a lot of ramifications mostly I think for the good. In the past AP1 s have done an excellent job but have had to work with their own bureaucracies which has caused problems at times especially when it comes to things like prosecutions.
    4 points
  44. Frazz for what its' worth I've found Fastways now Aramax to be the pick of the bunch. Really good service interisland anyway.
    4 points
  45. CourierPost are all care and no responsibility. We have used them for decades, and generally they are an amazing service. We meet the Courier, most days during the shipping season, at Taipa in the Far North at 16:00, and 99% of the time they are with our Customers the next morning. But, if there is an issue, the most you can expect is a Replacement CourierPost Ticket, they never cover the cost of the Queens lost. We value the service, and understand if Beekeepers rock the boat too much, and demand them to cover the cost of the Queens lost(which they won't), then the
    4 points
  46. -4c outside... but I think we having HotDogs for linch.
    4 points
  47. All honeys have the hydrogen peroxide effect. And for many types of healing, that is enough, when combined with the hygroscopic effect of the honey on the wound. That hygroscopicity (sorry - I just had to structure the sentence so I can use that word...) is what helps to keep the wound moist. I clearly recall Peter Molan describing this aspect. And then he followed up with a sudden, jarring photo of using honey for mastitis and other absolutely 'uhhh...' inspiring slides. He was a delight to listen to, for sure. You came away believing in the powers of honey, and manuka honey, in healing
    4 points
  48. From what i understand, the wound dressing level for Manuka honey is 10+ according to Dr Molan, or what he would call "medical Manuka" I think the wound dressing market use 16-8+. The higher the + after 18 the less effective it becomes, or there is no better effect.
    4 points
  49. So he did change the rego to him yesterday. Fortunately it was just as easy to change it back to me . Best $9 I’ve ever spent
    4 points
  50. Undersupply helps keep prices up and is way better than oversupply. I have no idea what this foreign propolis is like, it might be fantastic stuff which makes you wonder why they can't sell under their own country's name. Hopefully one day a reporter will look into the entire beekeeping industry in New Zealand and I for one will be quite happy to name and shame those who deserve it. Just because something is legal doesn't mean you should do it.
    4 points
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