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Showing content with the highest reputation since 29/11/20 in Posts

  1. Varroa have been a part of my beekeeping life forever. In the Forum archives (back to 2012) I have posts whinging about going to beekeeping conferences here and abroad full of promise and short on delivery when it comes to ways of managing the problem, and I retain what I think is a healthy scepticism about what I will call the ‘selective breeding’ route to a solution. From selecting for hygienic behaviour using pin or freeze killed brood assays in the mid-eighties, to the first Bond test (“Live and Let Die”) in 1993, selection for post-capping duration in the mid ‘90’s, and more recent work w
    7 points
  2. Went to honey off my quarantine site and yay no AFB this time round and a box a hive
    7 points
  3. Drone layers can be hard to find but not all of them look terrible. If I find them, I squash them.
    6 points
  4. Another method which I have used successfully is to turn off the laying workers by giving a series of frames with open brood which produces a pheromone with the required effect. One a week until workers stop laying (usually 2-3 doses) and it boosts the hive with brood as it hatches, then give a cell or queen when it is safe, or combine with a queen right hive. This does take time and uses resources, but very interesting for a hobby beekeeper.
    5 points
  5. Took my Year 10 class out to the hive on thursday. Was interested to see how they are going as it has been very wet down here in the South. A huge change from the perpetual drought of south canterbury. They had 2 boxes packed with capped honey and nectar so am going to have to give them another honey super. But i guess being on the edge of town they have been raiding all the local gardens. Took out a honey frame and the kids gathered around spooning up honey fresh from the frame. Even the too cool lads were very impressed.
    4 points
  6. Thought I might trade the cruiser in on a real truck. Just needs a coat of clear coat.
    4 points
  7. I have looked at the MPI's reasons for the ban but I cannot find why it was fine a year ago and now it's not. They are basically saying that honey is an animal product and as such you must be licensed to exported it. Mark Goodwin has argued that honey is not an animal product but a plant product and should be treated as such. I can see his point and think it's probably time that beekeepers in New Zealand United to get honey out of the animal products and into plant products. Sugar for instance is a plant product despite being heavily modified and refined by upright apes. One of
    4 points
  8. we normally have some cross over but this year the kanuka seems to be having a heavier and earlier flowering than usual.
    4 points
  9. where we are it usually manuka and then into kanuka. this year the kanuka is already flowering and the manuka is just getting going.
    4 points
  10. LOLA ..... One is too many. I tend to forget and move on .... it’s less destructive... and of course , the world is round and what goes around comes around.
    4 points
  11. Up until about 1950, NZ beekeepers continued to try out 'remedies' for AFB... The methods almost always involved shaking hives off the frames, sometimes multiple times, to try to use up the last of their stores. Equipment was variously scorched, boiled and disinfected, using the methods and beliefs that were common. It wasn't until about 1950 that (1) 'shook swarming', shaking bees off the combs to treat for AFB and (2) a serious attempt to reduce the risk created by abandoned or neglected apiaries. Even with the calls by the industry at the time, the Dept of Agricult
    3 points
  12. Had an email from my honey buyer a couple weeks ago to say they will not be buying any honey that has a detectable level of AFB.
    3 points
  13. Believe me when I say more hives is not the cure for stress more HOLIDAYS is a good start
    3 points
  14. As part of a research project with the dogs we have been doing a bit of spore sampling in honey to get a handle on the dogs efficacy. Some countries have a zero tolerance for AFB in honey. Hills Labs can test down to 36 spore/gram. Our lab test honey samples came back as undetectable. Give those dogs a bone .....
    3 points
  15. Been feeding bees today ..... about 120 of them, five litres of thick C4 and placing shop cloths above the brood, under the queen excluder, honey box on top. Last month was the starving month ..... we lost 14 hives on the Dew, starved out because we were too busy placing bees into the mother load ..... but it is what it is , we have nucs to cover but they won't make a crop, but at $4/kg I'm not to concerned at the loss of income. It's more the principle of the matter ..... having four live hives on a pallet ..... anal thinking , but there yah go ... it's all about the image. We als
    3 points
  16. I just harvested some if you’re interested. Ph number in profile. And I’m in chch
    3 points
  17. Try as I may I cannot understand why with no change in the law it has become a illegal to post honey overseas. I had several very disappointed customers today at the farmers market. I don't know a lot about what has happened but as far as I can see it is because of a ruling from MPI. It is way past time beekeepers stop being pushed around by bureaucrats with no idea of reality and the damage they cause and this is by no means the only situation where gross stupidity from people that are supposed to be helping the beekeeping industry have caused immeasurable harm. You can take ho
    3 points
  18. Most beekeepers have public liability, and hopefully professional indemnity. BUT, if something were to happen that OSH deemed you could have prevented or was in some way your fault, the beekeepers insurance might pay out the beekeeper, but then go after you for the money. However the reality is that if everybody decided it wasn't worth the risk, there would not be a lot of places to put beehives. To comply with OSH you need to assess risks to the beekeeper, and then take all practicle steps to mitigate or minimise them. You need to have paperwork, and it would pay to ch
    3 points
  19. Beekeepers and Beehive owners. I have not heard this comparison.I now have a 'polite'name for those that really should not be allowed bees. They make me sick.
    3 points
  20. Yes. There are several ways to deal with the problem but that is one. A suggestion, don't shake them all out at once, just a few frames a day for several days so you won't get overwhelming numbers arriving at the queenright hive at the same time. But try to get them shaken within a week or so. Then you can add the combs of drone brood back to the hive so the bees can clean them up. To know if it's laying workers or a drone laying queen, look at the eggs. A drone laying queen will still lay normally, one egg bottom centre of each cell. Laying workers there will be many e
    3 points
  21. This comes from 1954. I think there are photos of both beekeepers in subsequent beekeeping magazines...
    3 points
  22. If you do find out, first thing to do is send them an invoice for damages. Make it realistic - i.e. fair values but make it complete, travel, time etc cost of digging hole.... At this point you have established a cost. The beekeeper may actually decide to pay the bill. I have experienced this. If they don't, they are now very aware of the cost to someone else that their actions (or lack of) have caused. At this point if they refuse to pay, you can take them to the disputes tribunal. The cost is low, tribunal is less like a court and more like an arbitration. Depending on how
    3 points
  23. I’m not sure you mention when the hive swarmed. Wait another couple of weeks before checking again. There could well have been a virgin queen running around or out on a mating flight.
    2 points
  24. the migrant arrived yesterday to get the site on our place ready now he has finished with pollination. his bees have been struggling this spring like lots of beeks in nelson area. this yr some of the big rata are completely covered in buds but i have seen trees with no buds. often you will get a patchy flower on the tree but this yr it seems all or nothing. the manuka and kanuka are early. i will post how it unfolds here on the forum, it will be an indication of how it will be further south.
    2 points
  25. Controlling AFB is a bit like surfing ..... you sit down in the trough waiting for the big wave , knowing there will be a big wave .... it's just a question of when. The only difference is that when you are burning your hives you're not screaming Jeronimo. No, the feeling is worse than when you've lost you board shorts in the back wash of the gravelly beach.
    2 points
  26. 2 points
  27. It's a game of 2 halves. The Manuka producers and all others. One half spends the other is in holding pattern. Bit like how costs affect the low income more than the richer. And Apinz is pretty well all wealthy Manuka folk. And more influencial. So an increase for them is ok. So Farmlands put out a regular magazine. Last one showcasing beekeeper in the Manuka. It's just rude. I plan to stand in Apinz next time round....
    2 points
  28. Explanation - someone’s making good money and it ain’t the beekeepers...
    2 points
  29. That's a negative. Taking a leave out of James C's Book of Optimism. Money under the mattress. Not looking to produce any this season. Weird aye. I do wonder if more like me are considering a heavy hive versus a box of non Manuka. I prefer a solid beast, no feeding, until my next pollination return. Be super tight dutchy.
    2 points
  30. Guys ..... have you no imagination ..... and besides, you can get three on the front bench on comfort .
    2 points
  31. I was meaning to say that by about 1950, the Dept of Agriculture had stopped allowing the 'shook swarming' method. The reduction in AFB overall, and an industry-wide interest in dealing appropriately with AFB led to calls such as this to reduce the risks that are out there...
    2 points
  32. Thanks for the referral Trev. At the moment can't supply, due to caging orders last week, not to mention the strong winds the last fortnight.
    2 points
  33. 2 points
  34. It's all about good decisions, throwing good after bad or very keen to save a hive with frames from a strong hive with brood to spare. Just that there are lots of options, and that laying workers are uncommon as we keep a close eye on the queenright status, and act before workers start laying. Or get caught out being so clever !
    2 points
  35. Interesting Nikki, yes there has been a shift in the normal pattern here this season also.
    2 points
  36. If I add in turns 2 bf with open brood and still no qcells started, there must be some queen inside. That is my thinking, doesn't have to be correct.. If other hives are not so strong, I would not take brood from them. I would just shake out and move on. The hives from which I take bf are usually 10+ with bf.
    2 points
  37. When I have weak lw colony, I do shake out. But if I have decent lw, I give bf rather than shakeout. Less work and easier for me to do so. So far it was sufficient 2x bf to they return into normal. This way I don't have to take hive some 50 meters away, brush/shake all the frames, fork all the drone brood, think where all the surplus frames to " stick" or fear if stored wax moth will destroy. A lot here merged with newspaper and almost always they lost their queen, as they claimed to me. I never tried by myself, easier to learn by other's mistakes, than my own. The loss of few bf from ot
    2 points
  38. This method is talked about a lot on our side of the world. I tell folks it's a waste of time and brood. Instead of wasting 3 brood frames and 3 weeks on a laying worker, put those 3 frames in a nuc box together. Now you have a viable colony which can either raise a queen, or you can introduce one. Shake out the laying worker colony and put the box away leaving it's spot empty, use some of the drawn frames to finish populating the box you put the new nuc in. the bees you shook out will beg their way into any other colonies in the area. This method uses the same amount of resou
    2 points
  39. That are all same size boxes ( same size frames), lang deep. Above 1st box is framed qe with entrance. Maybe some boxes have cracks across and look as two smaller boxes. I hope that is answer to your question or I misunderstood ( my English..).
    2 points
  40. If you are not sure if you have a drone layer, maybe you could put an empty box on the hive base and shake them into that. Then put on a QE and the rest of the boxes with frames on top of the QE. 24hours later, your drone layer might be underneath the QE. Normally a QE will hold out a drone layer too. If there is no queen under the QE then shake them out over the grass as for laying workers.
    2 points
  41. Nah, some can lead happy lives,and be shizzers the entire time. Never goes round. Karma?
    2 points
  42. I saw only one egg in cell which did make me wonder , laying workers I have had experience with in the past had many eggs . 10 days ago I saw two nice looking queen cells with lava in the bottom . They had disappeared , or been turned into drone cells . As I am shaking out the frames a will have a good look for the queen . I have decided not to swap my hives to get a strong honey collector. I am now robbing frames of capped brood to build up the hive untill the new queen gets really going .
    2 points
  43. I think the thing is , it’s a case of keeping a tidy backyard. You may not like the guys, but if their laidbackness has the potential to cause you a headache ..... I’d be helping them out. Besides, life’s too short to have too many enemies.
    2 points
  44. Thanks Chris, over at the apiary we hadn't a clue what was going on! Far from the Madd(in)ing Crowd and no romance...
    2 points
  45. This year the TECT Park About the Park - TECT Park WWW.TECTPARK.CO.NZ had an open day for its 10th anniversary. They had the 4 wheel drive club taking kids (young and old) for rides through a long course, ponies, face painting, Santa arrived in a chopper, there were buses running nonstop between the different areas of the park from paint ball to model planes and to clay shooting. All the park user groups were represented and of course that includes us. In the Fun zone with bouncy castles, music stage, we had a gazebo beside story time and face painting with a
    2 points
  46. Yep. No problem. Just move them
    2 points
  47. It is maybe lot different than your area ( climate, different bee lineages), but all beeks I know here use qe with entrance. It has some disadvantages as other people mentioned above, but I believe honey box is filling faster ( which is crucial to us, due to short intensive forages we have). Also mentioned above if drones are trapped above, that can make a lot of problems when they try to get out or die above. Some disadvantages as occurring odd queen above qe, well we turn into split or remove it and have some extra brood on the cost of honey. Also when changing queens, some - even me sometim
    2 points
  48. I was pumping syrup this morning and thinking about Stoney and his C4 sugars, and the be honest, as the rain tumbled down and the bees hunkered down talking about the sweet Manuka around the corner, I couldn't give a toss about C4's. C4's .... does the rest of the world care about C4, or is this a NZ phenomena .... I thought I might change the sign to 'worlds end'.
    2 points
  49. I agree with Trev , Oh Rainswept one. Patience girl, let the virgin get mated and lay some eggs and then check she's not a drone layer. Then perhaps leave her some more ..... and then about the week before Christmas even the brood in the two hives up.... and Hey presto, you'll have more honey than you know what to do with !
    2 points
  50. Back to the same apiary today and another hive with one cell infected. Every time I find an AFB it's pretty much a whole day wasted by the time I pick it up and burn it. This one also has close to a box of honey so I will need a deeper bigger hole this time. This is hive number seven. One idiots carelessness and the cost to other beekeepers is pretty staggering. I have been inspecting two frames in each brood box every time I visit. You could ask why I don't do a full brood inspection and I would reply that it's partly a matter of time and also to keep robbing down which i
    2 points
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