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Showing content with the highest reputation on 13/11/20 in all areas

  1. We know another couple well, they keep bees about 20km from here. He is a pharmacist, she works in an office in town, they have 6 colonies on their property. He decided to just keep a kit around 'just in case', the type where you have to draw into a syringe then inject. His rationale, if anybody around was having a reaction, he is well versed in how to do the process and apply the injection, so no need to spend the extra on the auto-injector. Wind the clock forward 4 years, they are out in the bee yard one Saturday afternoon and he got stung, has never had a reaction in the past
    5 points
  2. @Alastair, it’s my understanding that anyone can become allergic at any time even old timers who have been stung hundreds of times over the years .
    3 points
  3. Easy job.and with no rain on the radar,can leave trolley over night then wheel the new colony to prepared spot. Love my wee trolley. Fits the hives perfectly and takes up to 250kg
    1 point
  4. Community service done. Collected a swarm from a residential address on the edge of town (Putaruru). Used extension pole and swarm catching net. They used to be available from Beequip from memory. Nice sized swarm 10 frames worth of bees. Once again another swarm to move out to a quarantine yard.
    1 point
  5. Fair enough to put that in a job ad. Remember maybe a year ago when a member here was asking about his "rights"? Because he had been fired from his beekeeping job which he had held for less than a week. When the truth eventually got out, it turned out he had told the employer he had several years beekeeping experience so the employer assumed he could deal with a bee sting. But as well as being pretty useless and therefore disliked by his co workers cos he didn't pull his weight, he went home mid morning on his last day because he got one bee sting while extracting
    1 point
  6. 1 point
  7. Epipens are a no brainer. We keep one in the big truck and one in the smoko room. In this day and age it pays for the employer to cover his backside for the eventuality of when the poo hits the fan. We had a situation the other year when an employee went into Ana shock six months after he had started working on the bees. The Epipen was expired, but the medic on the end of the 111 call advised we use it .... I would suggest @ThatBeeGuy talks to the Boss in a quiet time and gently rolls his case.
    1 point
  8. I have had an anaphylactic reacion, after a bout of flu when my immune system was down, requiring emergency adrenaline by the local area medical centre, with very successful follow up in the South Island honey bee venom desensitisation programme at Christchurch Hospital. In over 20 years I know of 2 fatalities from honey bees and these were children of beekeepers; one of whom was not in a beekeeping situation; both of whom the parents were my customers. In other instances of anaphylaxis the ambulance has met the patient who was taken by car to the halfway mark, or the
    1 point
  9. Is the employer resistant to an epipen- or to having an adrenalin kit available? the two are vastly different on both function and cost. IMO if the employer provides an adrenalin kit, then if the employee prefers to have an epipen, it isn't unreasonable for that to be at the employees cost. I think any beekeeping operation would be found negligent by worksafe if an event happened and it was found there was no access to Adrenalin.
    1 point
  10. Reality is it will be resisted by most empoyers on the grounds of cost, and that it has never been done. But if the matter went before OSH, they could rule that "all practical steps should be taken", and that would include provision of an epipen. However the employer would probably get away with the $35 version, because although someone in severe anaphylaxis may not have the presence of mind to draw a syringe, it takes a few minutes to get to that stage, and once the first signs are identified, a shot could be administered. Or, a policy of always 2 in a truck could solve it from an
    1 point
  11. Welcome to the forum @ThatBeeGuy. I hope you can get an answer to this but I don't hold out much luck. Yes, you would think that commercials would carry at least 1 epipen per vehicle.
    1 point
  12. Yes, ply is name of material we used.. I placed somewhere on forum pics of mating nucs and nuc which I made of that ply which are only painted outside, not treated inside. I still use these mating nucs and nuc and have no issues visible.
    1 point
  13. I've got treated ply with a couple of coats of paint. If the bees have no reason to chew on them there's no issue.
    1 point
  14. 2 boxes just in case. Baited with lemongrass oil.
    0 points
  15. Not very quiet round Hoki. I see plenty bee trucks on road. Must be money in Quintinia ?
    0 points
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