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  1. NickWallingford

    NickWallingford

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    Dennis Crowley

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    Maru Hoani

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 16/06/20 in all areas

  1. This didn't happen in isolation, it was after a major issue was discovered. But this sort of scaremongering is the wrong message being sent out there.I was talking to a waikato beek last spring, he had a few afb's showing up, asked me what to do as he heard from to be careful as the AFBPMP would come and burn his outfit. After I read him the riot act and made him aware of his responsibilities, he was all good. He only had 6-7 hives out of 800 that were infected and they were all in one yard, so likely a local issue close by, but the information he getting about businesses getting bur
    6 points
  2. At one time, I think Dr Goodwin used to refer to 'uninfected', 'contaminated' and 'diseased' hives. More commonly, they might be 'uninfected/clean', 'sub-clinical' and 'visual'. A few quotes from Mark. Remember, he has worked with 'sub-clinical' infections since the early 1990s, and has seen the efficacy of the plating/testing method improve dramatically. "Uninfected means that the colony does not contain any AFB diseased larvae or any AFB spores. However, I have heard it suggested that if you looked hard enough you would find AFB spores in all hives. This is probably
    5 points
  3. OK .... Tonight I have been in deep thought about selling honey ..... and after a few comments last night, and after reading a post today from the Green mussel man ..... I had a thought. Bruce tried it last year with the Co Op . We have made no progress, and we have made no headway .....and to go for a full year with no progress is essential a regress. So .... I am looking for expressions of interest to form a Honey Collective. The goal is to sell honey that is light in colour and low in MGO that generates a return to the producer that will keep them a
    3 points
  4. If those contaminated stickies pose a risk to the neighbourhood bees that clean them up, they must surely pose more risk to the beekeeper's own hives if he put them on next season. Rather than neighbouring hives sharing in the spore load from the 30% of boxes that were infected, the beekeepers own hives would be getting the 'undiluted' spore numbers. Inspections - regular, thorough and effective - combined with some form of marking and/or quarantine to be able to trace problems such as in this case. If you haven't managed to incorporate those two into your operation, by the time
    3 points
  5. Finally my boys big enough to help do a job one less thing for me to do, he smokes my hive I'm working then moves ahead of me smoking and he's really keen too, proud daddy moment
    2 points
  6. I was hesitant initially to actually name the product but apitraz is what seems to be causing the problem with my friends hives. I will see if he can find the batch number. It seemed to work fine on my hives and those I checked with an alcohol wash had zero mites. The only reason I went away from Apivar is that ripping the strips apart aggravates a bit of arthritis I have in my hands (so much for bee stings preventing arthritis). It does look on the surface anyway as if there has been a problem with the product rather than resistance which is great for the on going use of the product but prett
    2 points
  7. Had a similar experience. Put it down to an Apitraz failure, not resistance to Amitraz. We seemed to get good initial knockdown with the Apitraz, but later in the treatment period its' efficacy dropped away dramatically, and we had hives damaged by high mite levels. Like you, I used some Apitraz in 2019, and had no issues. With Apitraz and and Apivar we have 2 strips which carry the same amount of amitraz, but they are very different strips. Apivar seems to deliver amatraz to the surface of the strip for a very long period of time, in fact months later
    2 points
  8. Thanks for sharing David. Great to know I'm not the only one to get caught out. I must also say that the supplier has shown concern and is being very helpful.
    1 point
  9. Maybe take some samples and get it tested to find out what poisoned them???
    1 point
  10. Wowee! Middle of June and the bees are pouring out of the hives at 8.30am! Loads of pollen saddlebags and heaps of big heavy girls crash landing. I wonder what the forage is?
    1 point
  11. Someone like Dr Mark Goodwin could give a much better picture of how prevalent subclinical AFB was in the past but I do know there were large areas where it was exceedingly prevalent and that was using the old testing methods. The new test is incredibly sensitive. Given that this new tests can detect the merest sniff of a wiff I think we can expect positive results from hives within cooee of your own or someone else's infection. There is ongoing research to quantify just what different spore levels mean in terms of infection potential. This is amazing science and has huge pot
    1 point
  12. The question is: is it acceptable (or even legal under the afb pmp) to allow this beekeeper to use any of these supers on healthy hives next season? This is likely one of the reasons why he got to 30% afb already.... Reading the afb order in council it appears that burning contaminated and potentially contaminated appliances is actually a requirement under section 28 (1), 29 (1) and 31(1) Of course if I am the affected beekeeper I won't want to believe that all my boxes are suspected of being contaminated..... , but the prevalence of afb in my operation would speak loud
    1 point
  13. Took about 5 years of overloading, it's getting fully worked, probly cost me more than the load of kanuka bush honey I was taking in but atleast nobody was hurt and the recovery was easy You can always buy a new trailor.
    1 point
  14. ouch. lucky it wasn't much worse. but thats what constant overloading does. fatigue cracks in the centre of the springs. probably a safe bet that the other springs are all cracked to. tho not the worse i've seen.
    1 point
  15. I struggle to believe that some beekeepers may believe that management agency would be a thread to average Joe beekeeper. From what I have seen they are dealing with the worst offenders..... If someone is found with 30% afb in the Autumn after he extracted honey and with no traceability in place. How can you identify the 70% stickies that came from healthy hives now that they are on storage in the shed mixed up with contaminated boxes?
    1 point
  16. Today's last load of honey, I must be the last beekeeper in nz getting honey extracted. Thought since it wasnt the biggest load it would be sweet as but nah, hit a few bumps on a bridge a bit hard and bang my rear leaf spring on the tandem trailor broke, took out the guard, broke the rim, brake line, bent the axle, and bent the remaining U bolts holding the springs Ended up putting it in 4 low and dragging it 10m over to the side out of traffic, wend for back up, had to re stack 78 boxes with human fork lifts then they lifted the trailor while I took the rear tires off and strapped t
    1 point
  17. Hi John, I have not posted much on here but do have a read now and then thought I would put my 5 cents worth in as this is something I have encountered this season. We used Apitraz last Autumn (2019) successfully and have used Apivar for many Autumns prior to then with no problems. We use this product in the Autumn due to the withholding period. This season we stuck with the same treatment program throughout the year but with a totally different outcome. We were still seeing mites and losing some hives after 4 to 5 weeks of Apitraz going in and bee numbers were dw
    1 point
  18. until

    Yes. it was a thoroughly enjoyable day. Those attending the tut thought it was worthwhile. The dog demo was great - made AFB detection look eazy peezy, and we saw the latest AFB sniffer dog in action who happened to be a rescue dog with spunk. It was a wonderful opportunity for those attending to meet Marco and have a chat. Pre dinner duck salami provided. The pork spit roast was fantastic, shoot the night before and cooked with beech honeydew. A great array of home made salads accompanied the meat with wonderful home baked corn bread - South American recipe. One beekeeper stunned us w
    1 point
  19. I have seen plenty of incompetent beekeepers with AFB problems . I have also seen far more competent beekeepers with AFB problems caused by incompetent neighbours. I was in this situation last year with two becoming infected in my home apiary. I was asked to join a study on subclinical AFB and was not surprised to find that the majority of hives in my home apiary had subclinical infections . That is what happens when a neighbouring beekeeper has robbed out hives (I am right next door to Arataki and it wasn't one of theirs). The vast majority of subclinical infected hives do not go on
    1 point
  20. You guys might well be right about this, but I've got no knowledge to comment either way. What I can say is that everything else they've said/done or tried to do has made complete sense to me and so on balance I'm going to remain a member and strong supporter of NZ Beekeeping until shown otherwise. I also paid my AFB rego fees normally and I'm very happy with the revised charging regime. I could not get my head around that invoice issue either. But you guys need to be careful just quoting that one passage of Waikato minutes. They previously went into quite a bit of detail about what
    1 point
  21. We are told you are always never too old to learn. I never really appreciated that saying til yesterday when I attended Maggie's Queen tutoring session. Thanks Maggie . ..... insights from a perfectionist as to how to succeed at the tricky job of raising cells ....gems of wisdom as too why she doesn't graft when the weather is cold, and photos of clusters of bees that explode into boxes of bees at a 5c temperature rise , and swarm boxes and supersudure boxes, and harnessing the power of the queen pheromone for the reward of cells of quality. And above all how practice, pract
    1 point
  22. I been happy so far 0 AFBs after last seasons 2 and 1 the season before all at the same site, all you can do is hope the neighbors doing his job! Same thing I had quite a while back at another area maybe 2014, took 2 seasons and it was gone.
    1 point
  23. Stand down soldier. No need for anger when someone makes a mistake. I meant synthetic.
    1 point
  24. Yes, in the hills and the tree lucerne is flowing again with a few eucalyptus having a go too. Not sure I could identify Grape holly... on another note, a land owner out near Prebbleton contacted me to say there was lots of dead bees in front of my hives... so I went out there today to check on the damage and it looks to be poisoning. All hives have equal amounts of wee piles out front with tongues out and the ones not dead are sort of paralysed. Anyways, inside the four I opened are looking pretty good, but they have lost quite a few foragers. Sad, but I think they’ll a
    0 points
  25. Aaah Bro .... I told yah to get a bigger truck ..... ..... Yeah Nah .... I feel your pain . We put a new log burner into the Bro's house today . The kitchen was like a sauna for half an hour and then he rang to say the back wall was smoking. Fuuuuuuur . Back to square one.
    0 points
  26. I once got asked to move a yard of bees because they were attacking a woman's house. I don't like causing anybody any hassle so I went and had a look. The house was over 200 m from my bees and she was renting it. Turned out that there was a camellia in full flower next to her door. I know what I wanted to say to her but I just politely suggested she cut the tree down if she didn't want bees around.
    0 points
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