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Showing content with the highest reputation on 27/03/19 in all areas

  1. I've just talked with Hayley Pragert she is one of the team in the pathogen program and she said it was my information to use and was no problem for me to share information, so when I get a chance later I guess we can open another topic and I will post my results.
    5 points
  2. I took part in the last round. I just got my results last week. They put me on the round as I have been using OA strips only for 18 months and they wanted to know if my bees were any different from other results. I am happy to share.
    3 points
  3. I guess there's a few things missing in this theory, one is where are the virus coming from to start with, if there have been no varroa counted in the past two rounds, so basicly a year, autumn and spring sample, where are the virus coming from, if oa, and fa, reduce the viruses what does reduce it by? and how? It can't just be the bees cause over that period of time they have naturally been and gone so now I have fa killing "sick bees", and oa killing "sick bees", and then natural life span " dead bees". No varroa spreading it?. I'm not saying that the acids aren't doing it but how d
    3 points
  4. Something i learned at the courses i used to have to attend to be an approved pest control chemical handler was how they determine the limits for poisons we are exposed to. Without writing too much and getting too technical, a poison that may find it's way into our food is first tested on rats to find what level will cause any symptoms, and what level below that causes no symptoms or damage of any kind. Then they divide that by a thousand, and that is the maximum safe level for a human. They figure out how much of a food someone might normally eat in a day, and then the poison leve
    3 points
  5. Tony, there is research on this, in short wax from varroa dead-outs had higher levels of DWV in in than normal wax, and these virus were transmitted to pupae. However if the frames were rested ie taken out of action for 30 days the virus load dropped significantly. See here: for the research.
    3 points
  6. I had a random thought today about swarming. This season I sort of knew that prices would be well down and I only did the bare minimum of work in my Hives Spring checks and treatments, excluders and boxes on, Honey off check and treat, Honey back on. I had more Spring swarms than would be acceptable in most areas because my focus had moved. My random thought was that there are going to be many Beeks hunkering down, maintaining a manageable number of Hives with little or no intention of maximising Honey production so not worrying too much about swarm control in spring. The country
    2 points
  7. We aren’t seeing all that awful sooty mould on everything growing under the willows or the dark patches on the roads that have willows hanging over them. it would be good if the harlequin ate scolypopa nymphs as well
    2 points
  8. Not seeing very much willow dew at all for the second year. We had the ladybirds between the hive mat and the lids in big numbers last year.
    2 points
  9. These types of threads are one of the reasons I enjoy this forum so much. very interesting question.
    2 points
  10. To don't trick you look. It is tough and thick, especially when is cold, these days it is really hard to pull it out from barrel even it isn't crystallized. When you let it drop from above it slaps in wide thin layers not as beam/stream. Its high demand is cause it is neutral in color, taste and You should ask yourself.. how much of sage, lavender honey is in the jar of declared sage/ lavender honey or some even more expensive honey. Declarations here are just joke.. Like when is written origin of honey on the jar ( from EU and none EU countries ).. People here don't believe what
    2 points
  11. Hard case thing is that at the time it almost overwhelmed me also but now I cant even remember what the last formatt looked like
    2 points
  12. I checked my first lot of re-queening today(My own 10 day cells) 28/28 it doesn't get any better.
    2 points
  13. I'll back it, don't get me wrong I agree with being audited, but for probably the majority of extraction plants operating at most 5-6 months most maybe not not even that, why two?, and agree the hourly rate is next level, like I understand costs and value of time etc but man they are the highest paid people on my books, I guess that's the thing that gets me the most, the other being they waste time checking trace ability twice a year when we are only producing once a year why? They can see the exact same info on one visit why do they need to see it twice. Different if your buying and packing a
    2 points
  14. So just over two weeks ago we harvested the honey out of the school hives. We were using the scrape technique to get the honey and wax off the plastic foundation. I popped the wets back on the hive they came from. While I was there, I removed the queen excluder. Currently the hive has 2 fd boxes with the 3/4 box of honey super wets on top. Today I popped the lid to see what they had done to the wets (being my first honey harvest and all). To my surprise I saw this. I say surprise but I tried to run the hive without an excluder and found the queen laying in the top box early in the season
    1 point
  15. Sorry Kaihoka What I meant was there will be Hives out there that are run at idle for one or two years while the Beek '" waits and see's" Thats why I called them wait and see hives They will get treated and inspected and not much more so they will swarm and do what Bees do. Maybe, maybe not. Among the survivors will be those who are able to slip back into liquidity most easily Often those will be the ones who have probably been in the game for a relatively short time, still have contacts in their prior industry and dont have huge sums invested in plant and staff
    1 point
  16. You don’t need to, just eat the bees
    1 point
  17. Bayv out staples in, I only left one super on for the Bush flow so a lot of my hives are chocked out and pumping with their fourth treatment of the season
    1 point
  18. At the SNI field day a scientist spoke of a couple of products one of which was better in his opinion. It may have been this one but cant remember https://www.google.co.nz/aclk?sa=L&ai=DChcSEwj0kbrp-qHhAhVLho8KHcVkBUsYABAIGgJzYg&sig=AOD64_0BBFKd60t3DKKbaBuzuXP9n-g5ZA&ctype=5&q=&ved=0ahUKEwiuwLPp-qHhAhVUWX0KHWAKD3wQ9aACCDY&adurl=
    1 point
  19. I haven't had any issues with willow dew this year, very little of it coming into hives in the Far North. Last year there was definitely more, and the year before was a real nightmare.
    1 point
  20. Hmm interesting, this is taking it to the next level, but you maybe on to something here, not sure if theres any research on this, basically if I can read between the lines your basically suggesting that the viruses are surviving in honey?. I like the theory.
    1 point
  21. Yea I used to push out till now, but I don't graft in March any more, the mating success is reduced so much for me I find it not worth the work fixing things etc. Yea I should have added my poorper splits are mated in my drone production area so these are selected drone hives actually the ones in my bee pathogen program, which are selected originally from varroa survival but of late its honey and overwintering strength.
    1 point
  22. Yes, those self made ones can be great. My success on requeening with cells over late summer- probably 75-80%. Out of the balance, half will make their own and the rest will go queenless/drone/rubbish. When I see those self made ones, well they are often darker/stripey and look like good layers. If you allowed self make, expect a degrading of stock over time. I select my breeders early spring- probably mark 30 odd hives from 600 which I whittle down. This year 6, all of which I use, which is important.
    1 point
  23. I wonder how much impact other insects such as Argentine Ants have on bees. They carry and transmit DWV also.
    1 point
  24. The giant Willow aphid population is at its lowest for the last three years here . There are only small clusters of about 100 here and there rather than the trees being covered by them completely . Wasps are working whatever dew there is. Bees have never been interested
    1 point
  25. I was in the last round too. Happy to share
    1 point
  26. This is the second season here that we haven’t really had any willow dew flow. I tried to post a photo the other day of what I think is a harlequin ladybird but it was too big to load. If we have these ladybirds here that would explain the absence of willow dew. We didn’t mind the dew the bees seemed to winter well on it and it meant we didn’t have to feed.
    1 point
  27. Window frame ( pics taken in front of window).
    1 point
  28. BSB,Otto, yes I agree, it was a question someone posed to me about comeback on breeders. I mention to them that first you should learn how to raise cells/queens yourself even on a small scale just to see whats involved, then when you do buy from others at least you will have an understanding of whats involved and what is needed to get the best results out of the cells/queens.
    1 point
  29. Great idea Tony and appreciate your openness about where your hives are at. My guess, and it is a guess, that there are many viruses lurking in our hives most of the time and it only becomes a problem when bee health is compromised, when does this happen, I have no idea other than the obvious signs. Like the rest of the living world really.
    1 point
  30. Its appears that the Staple for whatever reason is the only OA delivery system that has the potential to really hammer the Bees causing this well documented initial die off. There are two types of die off, localised and in the field. So unless you are seeing a reduction in Bee numbers at the initial few days of treatment then I would be of the view that the virus loads wont be affected by OA itself. One of these days Ill try and plot the weight loss curve for a staple in the first 48 hours of use.
    1 point
  31. Have you tried heat treating the brood frames like they did for the Cororapa issue?
    1 point
  32. When showing jars, for some trivia this is last year black locust honey..
    1 point
  33. At 1.23 you could eat it till the cows came home. The limit just a few years ago was 2.0 and no one got hurt. The limit is now .7 which is well over 100 times lower than would cause any symptoms. Legally of course you can't do anything with it as it is but you could blend it with another honey to take the whole batch below .7.
    1 point
  34. Very silly management. Sell few hives for a quarter of the price or less and there is the money for the treatment.
    1 point
  35. If glycerine was toxic to bees , surely the initial die off would continue all the way through till the hive had died off ? If the idea that the glycerine is toxic and only causes an initial due off , then that suggests the glycerine is quickly ‘removed ‘ from the staples , or the remaining bees develop a rather quick tolerance. Neither of those two suggestions make sense to me . Perhaps you need to do a trial and see if you can negatively impact some hives with just glycerine staples to confirm that theory or rule it out
    1 point
  36. @nikki watts, I would bomb those hives with Fa, yes it will knock the socks out of them but you need to get those mites out asap, if you have other healthy hives around I would be looking at those for a donor once you have the mites gone. Staples and synthetic are not going to cut it at this stage, Interesting, did he know about the oa/gly, before this? Or was that just a opinion he had on the spot, did he understand the point of the gly treatment?, oa/syrup as we all know works but only has a limited kill time the point of the glycerin is to extend the kill.
    1 point
  37. I don't have any Argentine Ants in any of my apiaries but I am aware of them being in others and the beekeepers are managing them with ant poison in small containers under the hive lids, they report some success with this and no effect on the bees.
    1 point
  38. Well, the bees do get it wrong sometimes. 2 kg swarm today when I am wintering all my hives down. I would not usually collect at this time of the year but it was in a community area so i could not really refuse. I wonder how much work is it going to be for get it thru to spring. I love seeing the bees walk into a new hive.
    1 point
  39. How come you destroyed the cell? Possibly in the process of supercedure. If you do that to late in the season you could end up with a queenless hive come spring. Just curious, not berating your decision.
    1 point
  40. “Dad... I dug another hole”...
    0 points
  41. OK .... so we probably have half a million too many bee hives .... right ? My thinking is that I buy a couple of diggers and go contracting . I have three boys who quite like digging holes !
    0 points
  42. Ha, had me fooled. ? Do they have barbers in Croatia?
    0 points
  43. Yea I'd start a new topic on this but if I'm the only one of the 59 in the program on here theres not much point haha, I hate talking to myself.
    0 points
  44. Manuka exports are down is what I been told Multi floral manuka people tell me they can't sell I have been offer $6 for multi floral 93 % manuka last was a lot more
    -1 points
  45. Mistery of where the bees collected this dark honey is over!!! The Tutin test has come back a fail at 1.23mg/kg. Yikes I tasted it and have read it can take only a tsp full do do you severe neurological damage! Won’t bother with a pollen count aye, first time I have had bees collect Tutin laced honey.
    -3 points
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