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Showing content with the highest reputation on 16/07/18 in Posts

  1. True. Don't rely on it because sometimes I'm a bit lazy and you'll catch me out, but they are very different. An organism has two basic types of defence mechanisms to increase its fitness when challenged with a threat; tolerance and resistance. Tolerance is defined as the ability to withstand the health impact caused by a given pathogen burden or toxin. Resistance is defined as the ability to limit the burden itself. The distinction is important, not just for being precise. Tolerance is a quality the host organism has that does not drive defensive retaliation from the pest, it does not drive e
    6 points
  2. Hmm. To post or not to post. I have this OP filed under ‘naïve’ rather than ‘ludicrous’ at the moment. A colony-level trait like hygienic behaviour (which is what varroa resistance seems to come down to these days) is an emergent property, a function of particular sets of genes, and their relationship with any number of diversely related patrilines (families) within three castes of bees. For hygienic workers, it’s highly probable that, if we accept that something like a freeze-dried assay is useful, only a few of a large number of patrilines will exhibit the trait and so only some sele
    5 points
  3. Mine were very buzzy over the weekend...
    4 points
  4. I'v made this today while I was waithing dipper to reach temperature ? Just a simple box for everyday beekeeping (smoker, hive tool...) and one smaller box for grafting tools, cell cups, light... Also could be used as a grafting frame stand, small grafting station, indeed.
    3 points
  5. I do too . Back in the days when we relied on our immune systems to be naturally kick started and boosted , which seemed to work well
    3 points
  6. Some people like to network. Some people like to listen to the presenters. Others for the social. Bigger companies "shout' the worker bees to it. For some, it's a holiday and excuse to visit other areas of New Zealand. It's expensive I find. And busy. Suppliers show their wares and shout a round at the bar. I prefer the more local type of get together. I wonder about similar types of events- The Home Show, Field Days, Food Shows, and lately I heard a Womans Show. You pay to get in and then pay for the food and crap. The stall holders pay a good amount to be
    2 points
  7. managed to get a look in the hives on saturday, was quite surprised by the findings. On hive I thought was very quiet and i suspected no one was home anymore, was actually doing fine, even brood in it, which does surprise me... the hives just dont seem to want to shut up shop this year.... frosts on the ground and all! Second one I checked had even more brood so I didnt delve too deep into the other 3. They are all fairly clustered though and mostly quiet compared with when I tried to look in them two weeks ago and gave up after looking at the first one and they were all over me.
    2 points
  8. Iron clad proof, no. Despite that the bee genome has been mapped, all the individual genes involved in resistance have not been fully studied and understood yet. However the deduction has been made and is generally accepted, that the genes involved in varroa resistance are either recessive, or have to act in the correct combination of several of them, because of the way varroa resistance is lost so quickly in succeeding generations if queens are open mated.
    2 points
  9. Have just returned from a holiday which didn't involve email or phone ! We (myself and @TammyW ) are heading to conference. We're both speaking in the science sessions - I'll be speaking about our new tests for the varroa resistance markers and our results to date and Tammy is speaking about her Masters project on Lotmaria passim (as well as nosema) prevalence around the country. You'll spot us around - at least from behind - in this: so feel free to bail us up to talk about AFB testing with DNA methods, bee pathogens and varroa resistance
    2 points
  10. It is different in taste, but rarely I get pure lime. It always come with blackberries, tree of heaven, honeydew - in various ratios. It is to me nice, I like it that mixed way. Pure lime is also nice honey. In fact if I have to choose between the rain or drought, I choose this rain. The world cup.. I don't feel such euphoria, while the country is pure mess..and most of us struggle to survive ( around 300 000 people runaway form country in 3 years and still go at same pace..). I am also teared should we stay or should we go.. I keep pushing myself to don't give up and try to stay even I
    2 points
  11. Unless things have changed since he was here in 2011 for the NBA Waipuna conference , you need to factor into Randy Oliver's talks - particularly regarding varroa, that he mainly produces and sells nucs, rather than produce honey so there are more opportunities for brood breaks, which of itself impacts the build up of varroa.
    1 point
  12. I started going to conference about 8 years ago and the first 2 or 3 years it was all interesting as it was all new to me. And then you start getting a bit more observant/critical as to what is going on at conference. From Rotorua conferences everything got cranked up...a lot more attendees were there and ever since then it seemed like the beekeeping industry has started a different sort of movement....maybe it’s the big boys coming in. The Networking can be excellent and or course 95% of the stalls are trying to sell you some sort of product or service which is fine..you see s
    1 point
  13. I dont think it would be unusual to breed Bees within a operation within a relatively remote location that are somewhat more Varroa tolerant than the national average After all, its been stated numerous times in discussions on this forum that its possible to improve ones own bees but very difficult to take that improvement and replicate across the country This is the basis for argument that Breeding program Queens are bound to give mixed results when sold out of their parent operations
    1 point
  14. what are you going to breed first. resistant bees or resistant varroa.
    1 point
  15. I for one would be keen on getting treatment free queens off you to trial if you had them for sale, but the fact that you are using strips indicates you are still a way off from that. I think what you are aiming for is a worthy goal.
    1 point
  16. If the research was funded by apinz only and apinz beekeepers were the only ones that sent in samples then yes that would be fair.
    1 point
  17. Common trap A hive that is totally isolated might survive but not because it is Varroa tolerant, much more likely because it is isolated. After you have had a few hindered hives for a while you see all sorts of natural variations ranging from very poor to outstanding. Trying to duplicate the outstanding is a fools pursuit A far more achievable goal is to keep healthy hives by intervention This may seem an unsustainable and short sighted approach but Im absolutely convinced that as Unsustainable and short sighted as it may be, it will certainly take you further for longer t
    1 point
  18. I found them. I have to say I face palmed several times as it was infuriating reading. Be interesting to see if any progress has been made. I am more interested in the selection and breeding of varroa resistant bees than seeking to use small cell foundation as a silver bullet. I am, and will remain, too small a fry to make much of a difference myself. But if I treat all my bees the same, and some hives are weaker than others, then I know to requeen from my strongest hives. It seems clear that bees can be bred to be treatment free/or at least varroa tolerant, as there appear to be
    1 point
  19. I imagine most beekeepers will have done their main harvest before the willow dew started to happen
    1 point
  20. Yes, as above we hope that all the science talks will be recorded. A number of people have asked about the varroa resistance but in fairness to the conference session, we will present the results there first. It'll be up to @TammyW as to the results of her work being put up here
    1 point
  21. @JohnF and @TammyW any chance of posting your results on the forum after conference for those that won’t be going.
    1 point
  22. I love these guys at the moment, their lyrics are bizarro, this one is my particular fave
    1 point
  23. Found this post on Beesource, written by user Grozzie2, a Canadian beekeeper. It is stuff that every beekeeper needs to have a good understanding of, and is a very well written piece. So with Grozzie's permision I have copied it here. Just be aware that their summer is our winter. So add 6 months on to any months or time he mentions. Also, their season and drone raising timetable can be a little different to ours, but the principles are the same. The original post is at http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?347723-Anatomy-of-a-mite-crash QUOTE - "Anatomy of a m
    1 point
  24. That 3km notice is very common, heaps of us have had it. I wouldn't be losing any sleep, but do keep up with the vigilance when you're working the hives, particularly a bit later on when the weather warms up and more brood starts to appear.
    1 point
  25. It's really easy & cheap to buy ox & glyc in small amounts and mix them .. Ox is not awful to handle or anything like that. Buy a pile of strips, make up your brew when needed. Oxalic from paint shops or bunnings etc, glycerine by the litre off TM.
    1 point
  26. Here is a 170 Staple Hobby pack with the option to get us to supply premixed Ingredients as well. Tonight or tomorrow Ill list them in the market place. Its a 10L poly Pail with 170 strips and an optional tub of ingredients inside if required. Combined price, delivered to most Mainfrieght Hubs NZ wide is $145.00 including Gst This price is a trial for now, wont be going down though. About 85 cents per staple with ingredient including gst and freight
    1 point
  27. No the only Gib tape I've used is three layers I want to compare the difference between them and the board. I prefer the board as I can make them in bulk and so far they preform well. The Gib tape takes me a lot more time to do as we did it by hand sewing 150ms at a time then cutting each strip. But I believe I need to try anything thing to see what works and what doesn't. Buying ready made strips and spending more time with the fire would be good.
    1 point
  28. Little Buddha spam! Starting to get real smiles now, but still very serious! Me and Mum, mostly Mum are setting up for a market soon, Riley is supervising and like your typical foreman she’s asleep on the job. Mums been very productive making soaps and happy feet (slippers). I made a human though so I win.
    1 point
  29. Yep #youcantbeatwellingtononagoodday
    1 point
  30. Just don’t go to Auckland and you’ll be fine ? definitely a terrible representation of the North Island. Wellington is ok tho
    1 point
  31. Gorgeous girl ! I bet you didn’t realise how much love you could hold in your heart until you had your beautiful wee girl she has changed your life
    1 point
  32. 6 weeks old now. Had her shots yesterday, she was so good, only cried a little and was fine 2 minutes later. Growing everyday. Ive been letting her have her little hands out a bit lately, she’s still getting the hang of them, she has been using them to pull her hair, she scratched her face too which she wasn’t impressed by, she needs to be supervised with them until she gets the hang of it. Took her to see Chris’s Mum last Sunday and she still had some of Chris’s gowns from when he was a baby so I perked those and she’s been wearing them, so cute! No
    1 point
  33. One local major Beekeeping organisation in the Waikato have had an outbreak of AFB and have been burning contaminated boxes for a couple months. Unfortunately they also stacked some on a pallet and wrapped them ready for destruction, but before they could another employee picked up the infected boxes, and mixed them with the other stock. Too often I hear the risk of spreading AFB is elevated by the hobbiest beekeeper, however I do question whether an organisation running 5,000, 10,000 or 30,000 hives can manage, minimise, and contain AFB. I think you would all agree that major operators are as
    1 point
  34. I got around to taking photos of the set of blocks John made Riley. They all fit perfectly inside the little beehive. @john berry Thank you. This is by FAR the coolest thing baby has, I absolutely love them! ? Everyone I have showed them to has also said they are amazing.
    1 point
  35. Varriti, would a catchy name for these Bees Ive claimed Stapriti already
    0 points
  36. I agree Even Nigerian widows deserve a decent pension.
    0 points
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