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Showing content with the highest reputation on 27/11/16 in all areas

  1. Success!! Got a call during a movie this pm from ABC - swarm in Titirangi. Exited immediately and gathered the @Trevor Gillbanks design swarm bucket and headed out west. The swarm was a good size but quite vertically well spread on a hedge. Trimmed around with loppers and then a vigorous shake had 2/3 in the bucket. The overspill bees quickly attached to the vents and then migrated into the bucket after I cracked the lid so I figured the queen was in there. A second shake got the majority of the others and over about half an hour or so the remainders walked or flew in. Got them home - they wer
    5 points
  2. @Philbee There is nothing quite like having a beer sitting around the camp fire, in the middle of the Australian bush as the sun sets after a long day with the hives. For that moment there is no desire to go into the caravan and knock up tin can meal..... the magic is in the silence interrupted only with hearing the calls of the little birds looking for a perch to rest on for the night.... and if the bees have had a good day I can breath in the perfume of curing nectar above the smell of the golden liquid in my can. Kiwis can have their beautiful white fields of clover and their squabbles over
    5 points
  3. Free Detector Dog inspection for AFB in Otago / Southland If you are interested by getting your bee hives AFB inspected by Jesse the AFB Detector Dog contact me. Jesse has been operational for over 5 years and has a very good track record. There will be no charge for the inspection only for travel expenses. In return I would like to use a new detector dog, Flynn to search the hives at the same time. Inspections can only be done at night. Please contact me if you would like some more information. Some conditions may apply. Rene Gloor Dunedin
    4 points
  4. And when the cells are capped and its workers, that's good. But I had queens in 2 of 8 splits start as drone layers, I just killed those queens, uncapped the brood, and papered them on to the mother hive. And had one 4 box hive needed queen cell, and the queen was a drone layer. Could not find her on 2 searches, today put the whole hive though a QE and found the beautiful, golden queen while sieving box 3, killed her and papered on a strong nuc set up into a 3/4 box a few days ago. Am waiting for many queens in nucs to reveal their capacity.
    4 points
  5. I did my first grafts on 6th November and since then have grafted on Saturdays and Wednesdays. Queen cells go out in to mating nucs Fridays and Mondays. It is going to be pretty busy soon with me now having done 6 grafts and still waiting for the first grafts' queens to get through mating flights and start laying. I think I will be up to 8 grafts by the time the first lot of queens are ready to cycle out of the mating nucs. (I missed a week grafting) You need a lot of equipment to cycle through even a small amount of queens for your own requirements let alone commercial production.
    2 points
  6. Oops....Mine turned up in my rural delivery letterbox within a week. I had not cleared the box so did not notice it! My bad.
    2 points
  7. "...If we stopped treating our bees they would all die in part because our hive density is much higher than it would normally be in a wild situation..." Hi @Philbee, do you mean your own operation or you mean all the other beekeepers as well? I don't treat my bees at all for many years now and regarding the density of hives in my bee yards there are approx. 30-50 hives. Is it a low or a high density? What ever, anyway they don't die anymore as they used do! I trusted the phenomenon of epigenetics... Maybe you just draw the wrong conclusion why yours would die. It's probably not the densi
    2 points
  8. The bottle brush sounds as if there is a hive hidden inside.
    2 points
  9. Instead of going online to use one of the grafting calendars available. I made my version for offline use in open office. If you would like a copy send me a pm with your name and email address and I will send you a copy. Daniel
    1 point
  10. Hey guys im new to bee keeping and iv caught a few swarms, so far i havnt seen any disease and hives apear to be healthy but im fairly new to it all and would rather a check from a well trained eye. Im based in geraldine in canterbury and i was wondering if any one would be interested in having a look through my hives with me?
    1 point
  11. Yup all registered, it turns out i dont have the right paper work for an inspection declaration maybe i got my hives to late in the season, il ring them tomoro and see if i need to get one filled out
    1 point
  12. I grafted on 23 October and cells went into mating nucs on 5 November. Checked yesterday and there were eggs and larvae.
    1 point
  13. I checked my last graft of the season yesterday. The cells went into nucs on the 11th Nov. They are mated and laying with most having brood at larvae stage.
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. Well done @Timw . It is great fun catching swarms. Very addictive.
    1 point
  16. Where are you in Canterbury? It is a large region.
    1 point
  17. they bearded to cool off the hive. didnt think the black tarp would reflect so much heat.
    1 point
  18. @frazzledfozzle Well since you mentioned the hazards of a beekeeper working in the Aussie bush, Mosquitoes bites would be No 1 (sitting around the dull camp fire after dark, with no bee suite on with a can in one hand and potato chips in the other, and no way to defend ones self). No 2 bee stings in the hand during working hours, No 3 tick bites that extend for weeks after getting back home in places that we do not mention, and finally No 4,5 the bites of spiders and snakes that I've yet to experience. Life is full of fun.
    1 point
  19. Ahh but what about the full body search for Tics every day and being on the lookout for snakes and poisonous spiders as you go about your work
    1 point
  20. I use a double nuc with two five frame supers on top works well for what i want running about a hundred of them
    1 point
  21. Aaah Grasshopper. The art of the martial art is to use the opponents energy to your own advantage. Ever thought of using the late aphid willow flow to draw out foundation ?
    1 point
  22. Yes at this stage the well trained eye of an experienced beekeeper wouldnt go a stray, i have put a post up to see if there are any local beekeepers interested in having a look at my hives, things have been a little bit trial an era but bees seem to be going well from what i can see, the slower ones were from smaller swarms that iv caught and could posibly have failing queens? il try get a hold of someone soon as my afb declaration also needs to be filed
    1 point
  23. Even this technique requires some understanding of bee biology and local environment and know when the flow will come on. If you combine too late you are waiting for brood to develop and hatch, potentially missing a short sharp flow of a week, or if done too early the aged work force die off while waiting for the flow and you miss out on the benifit. So as @tristan said, it may well be worth reducing the hive count and concentrate the effort on lesser hives. If wanting to recoupe some of the investment then selling a few hives might be a solution. Combining colonies could also help p
    1 point
  24. The best thing to do is get an experienced beekeeper in to evaluate. Your a beginner Beek with no skill or experience and way to many hives with the potential to cause big problems for everyone else. A simple solution is to sell off a lot of the hives. this will pay back your costs and then some. Reduce hive numbers to a more manageable amount that you can learn to beekeep on. you can then build hive numbers up as your skill and experience increases.
    1 point
  25. The problem is that the build-up might be too late for the target flow. I think of @dansar's suggestion as instant build-up. I suppose it all depends what's flowering down in Canterbury.
    1 point
  26. Yes. I understand that . however I think you will get a better build up with 2 queens .
    1 point
  27. Hi @john berry, I think it was when we flew up to Rotorua for the conference we had to make a detour via Napier for "mechanical" reasons. As we got airborne again I was shocked to see how dry it was then ... mid winter .... with north facing hillsides still burnt brown. You guys still missing out on the rain. It was the same down south for most of the winter .... dry .... up until about five weeks ago, since when the rain has just kept coming. Clover is oozing out of the ground but we are still feeding bees, or most of them as the days are still cool. The Matagouri is flowering in th
    1 point
  28. That's ok @Trevor Gillbanks i think we're describing two different things. I agree that a two queen hive can build up and work well with each queen benefiting from communal environmental control. In time the population will grow and with it the foraging force. What I was describing is a technique suggested to me by @dansar wherein you get a dramatic increase in forragers far quicker than if you left the bees to build-up naturally. My assertion that you'd get more honey is based on the fact that a hive split in two will gather less excess than if the hive was left un split. A critical mass
    1 point
  29. I fail to see the logic here. I regularly run 2 queens in my production hive. 2 queens means more eggs which means a greater workforce. If 1 queen fails, then there is a back up. I then split the hives at the end of the season with fully functioning queens Sometimes 1 queen will be slower because she does not have the workforce, when you combine 2 weak hives then you get a lot more bees and both queens think they are doing well and then increase their production. I am never over keen just to kill a queen because a hive (or in this case swarm) is small.
    1 point
  30. More importantly, have your hives been inspected for AFB this Spring? It's a legal requirement that all hives are inspected between 1 Aug and 30 Nov each year. You can find more in the AFB Pest Management Plan. I've attached the relevant section below. You must have been beekeeping for at least a year before applying for a DECA. So I'm guessing you'll need another beekeeper to do your inspection. There's a list of approved beekeepers on the AFB agency website List of COI Inspectors for Non DECA Holders If you need more info please ask. Then again, if your hives have already been inspect
    1 point
  31. That could be done but it wouldn't necessarily achieve the strong hive you need if you want a honey crop. The intent of merging two swarms is to give one queen a big boost in bee population. This translates to more forragers which means more nectar gathered equals excess honey. a small population can consume as much as they bring in leaving very little stored. If you keep two queens separated by an excluder then you don't get the increase in forragers. The second queen will employ just add many nurses and house bees as before. Of course timing is everything. You might not want to do this unti
    1 point
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