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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/09/16 in all areas

  1. Josh just for the heck of it, and if nobody closer wants it, I could send you a cage & return envelope, you could put the queen in with some bees and post back to me, I'll put her on a frame of brood and bees and see if I can get her running a hive again. I would report back here whatever comes of it. If you are game, pm me your address.
    5 points
  2. Pollination time, and another glorious start to a Hawkes Bay day Plums (Red Beaut) and nectarines (Rose Diamond), photos taken around 8am today. And so the season begins...
    5 points
  3. Ive been out today with a load of boxes to an Apiary that busting at the seems. It was only 8 hives but what crackers. All got a second box. As soon as the weather comes right Id say another 100 will go out. Inspecting my Formic acid treatment was interesting. The one treatment bag that I brought home to weigh had shed 40 grams in 8 days on a meduim/ strong FD single. This left 30 grams. None of the treated hives I inspected have suffered any ill effects and are full new brood. There was one that had to be different than the rest as there always is. Its an aggressive mongrol, it wint
    4 points
  4. Put Mite Away Quick Strips in on Friday... This hive must of had a much higher mite loading than I expected... photo of slide out base board
    3 points
  5. Completed all AFB checks this weekend. Hives generally growing well without stimulation. All have laying queens. One found with two queens. Another with single uncapped QC mid frame.
    2 points
  6. Has anyone heard about the predatory mite "Hypoaspis Miles" renamed "Stratiolaelaps scimitus" it turns out it loves Varroa mite and it is available in New Zealand, Hyper-Mite™ at Contact Details Ph: (09) 294 8973 Fax: (09) 294 8978 office@bioforce.net.nz Address: P.O Box 73, Drury 2247, New Zealand PRICE: $15.00 per litre (10,000 mites per litre, minimum order) plus GST and Freight which should treat 4 hives indefinitely. This is still being tested in Canada as I understand it but it looks very promising see youtube video
    1 point
  7. TradeMe is an overpriced money racking monopolistic corporate, you are all dreaming if you think they are going to sharpen up their act. The responsibility for this charade starts and stops with TradeMe who have failed the public of New Zealand yet again.
    1 point
  8. I certainly agree with the buyer responsibility where you're buying from an overseas website. But I think it's reasonable to assume you're buying a permitted product when you're buying in New Zealand from a New Zealand based website. However, in this case the listing did make it clear that the product was not already in New Zealand, but was being sent from overseas.. so a bit grey. Trademe, though, have such tight controls on some other products that I personally wouldn't think twice about the permissibility of buying most products listed there. About four years ago we sold..
    1 point
  9. New Zealand food safety were making noises about metalx around 15 years ago and I have been advising people not to use it for that long. At the very least you should paraffin your boxes afterwards to seal it in and the same goes for eco-wood . Metal X is expensive and from the few boxes I have had from other beekeepers I would say not very effective. There are however whole outfits that have used nothing else for many years so there are plenty of boxes out there. Frankly it doesn't matter whether something is dangerous or not, if a country doesn't want it doesn't want it. With New Zealand hone
    1 point
  10. In the opening statement, to import honey you have to either be registered as a food importer or use a registered food importer. That rules out 99% of the population. That's pretty restrictive in my estimation. But wasn't this tardme listing passed in, relisted, then withdrawn after complaints. Was any honey actually imported?
    1 point
  11. I recall the teacher saying during the beginners course, don't get too attached to your queens. She's just a bee. When she's good, great. When she's not, don't get sentimental. Or words to that effect. The message I took away was don't get hung up on trying to find a silver bullet queen. Some work. Some don't. That's normal. Mated queens will buy you a few weeks, relatively expensive weeks and even then she may not be accepted. Cells are much cheaper and acceptance is more reliable. If the cell doesn't work out then you buy another cell and go again. If you have another strong hive the
    1 point
  12. Not a Toyota fan..but after seeing what they did with the one on Top gear a few years back this one's got some life in it yet
    1 point
  13. Finished scraping off surplus burr comb and propolis off my wets in the shed, and cleaning up boxes. Split my first hive for the season. Queen, brood and nurse bees moved aside a couple of metres with syrup on top, leaving field bees with a frame of eggs in the original position. This hive was 2 three quarter boxes and one FD full of bees . Hives being fed twice a week are building fast on syrup and gorse. First blueberries are flowering , so they are about to go crazy
    1 point
  14. In the last decade an emerging public concern about diminishing honey bee populations has produced a considerable effort from scientists to study the issue. The EU established a working group of scientists from many parts of the world (known as ‘COLOSS’) who established standard methodologies and survey methods for studying honey bees which have been accepted everywhere. Over the last five years these surveys have begun to build a reasonable picture of what might be happening, but a notable absence was one of the largest beekeeping countries, China. With an estimated nine million beehives (FAO
    1 point
  15. I noticed that too and rang Maf who are going to investigate it, waiting to hear back.
    1 point
  16. Probably died inside the hive and was then dragged out of the entrance. Flattened by dehydration perhaps?
    1 point
  17. Nucs for sale these days are 1. Hard to find and 2. Expensive. If the hive does not have AFB, and it has honey, then you are probably correct the hive has been killed by mites. Formic Acid has to be done right or it doesn't work. The queen may be perfectly fine but not laying because of the circumstances. Because it has a queen, my first choice would be attempt to save what you have, and it is relatively simple if some nice person can give you a comb with a small amount of brood plus bees, and the brood should be point of hatch. You don't want brood that has to be nursed for another co
    1 point
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