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Showing content with the highest reputation on 15/11/15 in all areas

  1. Believe me, some dogs are aliens. I groomed a bichon for 3 years with 2 helpers!! We called the dog crocodile!!! Over 10 years I inherited MANY four legged furry aliens. Don' t worry I will get stung ,just as I sometimes got bitten.This is today's wonderful alien. Snapped at work. An Emporor Moth. 1st I have seen. Some silly people ran screaming??? Odd! I took it to a warm spot to dry out..,
    5 points
  2. You need more hives so you can check a different one each day :cool::rolleyes:
    5 points
  3. Yesterday checked the swarm I got two weeks ago. Lots of eggs, lots of uncapped nectar. Bees flying flat out and fetching pollen - the're going to do well.
    3 points
  4. Jezza the points you make are quite correct, and in fact there has been great spin offs even to beekeepers who do not produce high grade Manuka. Where the issues come in is that as well as the positives there has been negatives, mostly in the form of cowboy behaviour, and crazy site rents, even now apparently, for wintering sites with no Manuka or even forage expected. There may also be a looming AFB bomb. So not everyone is a fan but as I see it, virtually all NZ beekeepers are better off now than if Manuka was worth next to nothing, like it used to be. The wine thing is a very good exa
    3 points
  5. My bees arrived a week ago tomorrow, the seller placed them in the FD box I had set up. I had a good look while he did this we found the queen she looked well. He then placed the lid on and hive strapped. He then told me not to go into the hive for two weeks and he would be in touch before this. He said this was to give them the time to settle in. I have gone out each day a few times and just sat watching them come and go they are fascinating. If there looked to be any problems to just give him a call.
    3 points
  6. We are commercial, we don't ever take all the honey. We could, and then feed syrup. The commercial argument is that honey = $$$$$$ syrup = $. We have a lot less hassles and hopefully healthier bees. It's a decision that we made very early on in the piece. Perhaps not a commercial decision, but ours to make all the same. We feed dry sugar before it is an emergency or if a hive is hungry and has eaten its stores syrup. Not very often and not for long periods. We don't feed splits but split them with stores from mother hive. We also don't multiple split mother hive unless they are exceptional
    3 points
  7. Last week my daughter brought me a swarm from Otaki in a taped up cardboard box as per my instruction of how to. That's going strong already. Yesterday evening a call to catch one two storey high but made easy from a balcony. The path below is public access to the beach.
    3 points
  8. IMHO it's not working 'because' there are too many unregistered beekeepers flying under the radar. Don't do courses, don't belong to clubs and when a colony dies and gets robbed out...oops...go and buy a new one on TradeMe. Same box, same gear...same again next year. No proof for that statement, it's how I think the dice are rolling.:sick:
    3 points
  9. as you know, through a terrible error with varroa chemical, my hive #'s were decimated, i'm afraid i'm mostly after hive #'s this season. a long time hobbyist offered me a frame of brood, and two shakes of bees, and a q/c, looked like one of 3 s/s cells from a hive that was well stocked but no eggs he tried removing one of the cells, that ended up a no go, but found a good frame with a cell and lots of brood, ( lucky ) one cell was left in the mother hive, I supplied the donor hive which I put right along side the original ( moved the hive across a bit ) so field bees would work both
    2 points
  10. Thanks heaps Tristan I hope you and your best have the best season!
    2 points
  11. A non-beekeeping friend has been doing some study of local 17C wills and (death) inventories. A hive or hives (of bees) occur in some of the documents. The bees were regarded as an asset. An interesting will has details of who was to receive the various hives. The same will also details who was to get the swarms coming from the hives. This was from a period of skep beekeeping. I infer that it was likely that the swarms would be seen issuing, followed and captured. It is possible that "tanging" was used to identify swarm ownership and induce settling. A local manorial court record has
    2 points
  12. Hi @Wildflower Its an old discussion, my approach is that the bees are yours and its your decision how often you open up. And you open up for a reason, rather than fun. I found opening up frequently helps to track development, an example is: bees polishing cells ready for laying eggs laid hatch into tiny larvae grown, and larger each time you look, get a feel for growth rate get capped hatch Theory and pix are nice, but nothing beats seeing it happen. So I suggest that a limited look is fine every few days, using the method of: have your camera at hand puff of sm
    2 points
  13. 2 points
  14. Depends how you define 'over-smoked'. Sitting them on top of a barbeque... well, yeah.. pretty big. Getting a bit overzealous with the smoker... short term - they're going to get ticked off and have a go at you, so a couple are going to die, a few others will lose a few minutes fanning excess smoke out of the hive. Long term.. no effect on the bees. But you may ###### a bit of your honey with a smokey taint.
    2 points
  15. like a new toy, people want to play with it. every time you open a hive its an invasion. its stressful to bees. we don't need to be invading their home just for our pleasure.
    2 points
  16. my rule of thumb is as often as required but as little as possible. eg swarming season once a week, but winter not at all. i certainly don't like people who open them up every day to play with them.
    2 points
  17. Where'd you get that from? Smoke's about the most temporary influence on a hive there is - it distracts their sense of smell for about ten or fifteen minutes tops, and then it's gone. I've certainly never seen it to set a hive back. Working without smoke when it's needed has the potential to be far more detrimental to a hive.
    2 points
  18. thats odd. the box is usually part of it. if i was selling a nuc in a box, either swap the box over first thing or not at all. if its been in the hive for a while the box would be regarded as coming from an unknown source and possibly infected, so i wouldn't want it back. ie your hive could be robbing out an infected hive and if you give the box back they now have an infected box that will go and infect one of their hives. do your self a favor and stick to one size box. i don't know why people insist and using different sizes as it really does make things complicated (i've been grumpy to
    2 points
  19. AFB around here is the worst I've ever heard about. Everytime I Turn around someone has had an AFB find or knows of one. Its a total joke saying that the AFB PMS is to eliminate AFB from NZ. .
    2 points
  20. Understanding an insect is not like understanding an animal. I sometimes just watch them as if they were little aliens.
    1 point
  21. Mitre10 also stocks Metalex. I read somewhere that the green metalex has copper something-or-other in it and shouldn't be used with bees. The clear version was said to be fine so that's what I used.
    1 point
  22. Lots of folk say grace, pray and donate to the church. Personally Id rather buy a pot of manuka honey
    1 point
  23. if consumers think eating a teaspoon a day of 5+ does them good then it wont matter what kind of honey is in the jar as long as it has the Manuka label it will do the job. Where I see the problem is actively perpetuating the myth that honey less than NPA 10 has health benefits and trying to fit a manuka standard around this. Which is the biggest lie selling a low NPA traditional manuka kanuka blend as manuka honey or a NPA 5+ With 2/3rds of the honey content being Rewarewa? If something is perceived and not real then it doesnt matter whats in the jar its a crock either way. .
    1 point
  24. Checked my nucs yesterday afternoon they are so packed with honey the new queens are struggling to find room to lay,never had that this time of year
    1 point
  25. I have my smoker sitting close to my hive (generally hooked onto the open lid (TBH) but never smoke the entrance or the bees directly unless I'm being buzzed. When I need to move my girls out of the way I tend to gently blow on them lol :whistle:. No idea on why I tend to avoid smoking them other than that I cough like a freight train myself so imagine it's not pleasant...OK :rolleyes:...and I also love the bee movie and imagine Barry frowning at me...I ADMIT IT!!!!! :eek::oops: aarrgghhhhhh!!!!! :notworthy::censored::whistle::bee:. I'm still a beginner with only a years experience but I like
    1 point
  26. Yeah sorry about that - didn't want to bring everyone's day down. We'll get told off for going off thread anyway, so best not to go down that track!
    1 point
  27. Mine stays in the vehicle. And yeah, if something happens I have to get to it. That 20 meters seems a lot more attractive that the kilometre crawl I mentioned above though!
    1 point
  28. Plenty of info via the search too, that will get the questions flowing. And these two as a guide. November 2014 Apiary Diary November 2015 Apiary Diary
    1 point
  29. @tristan Interesting, I have read comments with people suggesting there your bees, look as often as you like? @Wildflower As you get to know your bees you can tell when they are getting annoyed. Nice warm sunny days, you can take a look see no problems, even just to lift the lid and look at a frame or 2, to get your bee fix
    1 point
  30. As a backyard beekeeper I'm not aiming to harvest tonnes of honey so I don't feed 1:1 syrup as a stimulant to make super strong colonies before the flow. Although I did do this to one hive for a month in early spring and compared that hives progress with another that wasn't fed. All part of experimenting and learning. Last Autumn I had a bad varroa infestation that nearly claimed two hives. Part of the emergency treatment involved feeding syrup to conn the queen into laying more brood to replace the diseased brood that was in the hive. Both hives survived the varroa but the late feeding st
    1 point
  31. I don't believe Manuka used in medical wound care is snake oil. Everyone agrees on that right? I have read that when used as medical grade honey in dressings the very high activity grade is worth $330 p/KG. A lot more of that grade in dressings will have to be sold to meet the government's target methinks. I've read the 2014 Apiculture Review and from it it looks like the p/KG value of NZ honey has almost doubled in a few years. I am wondering if that is solely due to; the increase in price in manuka (I.e. Non-manuka honey is still a similar price), a price increase in all NZ honey in
    1 point
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