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  1. AdamD

    AdamD

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  2. frazzledfozzle

    frazzledfozzle

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  3. neil miller

    neil miller

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  4. tom sayn

    tom sayn

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 31/08/15 in all areas

  1. Bees working the Broad Beans and Freesias.
    5 points
  2. Its not only the honey in the honey box thats a problem its also the wax. Residues from treatments end up in the wax which then ends up in your cappings which ultimately ends up in foundation which ends up in my hives that Ive taken care not to treat with honeyboxes on because I dont want residues in my wax! Theres a reason the instructions tell you not to treat with honey boxes on .
    5 points
  3. An interesting (and worrying) response, Tom. Thankfully, in the UK we don't generally have the pressure you have, however one of the suppliers (an offshoot from a US company) is pushing suppliments hard and with winter losses in the UK being too high, I suspect that new beekeepers in particular are being persuaded to use suppliments as a substitute for good husbandry.
    4 points
  4. @3bee, would be nice if your count of "stirrers" would at least equal your number of posts. if you can't contribute in a constructive way go trolling somewhere else.
    4 points
  5. I have just been shown a frame of brood with the AFB, sad but very useful. I was surprised at the lack of smell and apart from the patchy brood laying it all looked pretty normal. There was one noticeably sunken cell and several just slightly concave. We had to dig in to find the brown stringy goo. From now on if I see the slightest dip I will be digging in the cells with a match stick.
    3 points
  6. There was a small amount of mould on one of the outer frames on the lower brood box. Both hives are full depth doubles. The population does seem slightly higher in the Hive Doctor hive, however when I insepcted a week ago the both had a laying queen and good brood patterns. I do suspect it's a little to do with the way the treatment is applied to the two different hives - there is obviously a lot more disturbance to the hive doctor hive. Hopefully @Trevor Gillbanks will be able to pop out next week and shed a little light on the subject. I'm quite certain, being that I got my first hiv
    3 points
  7. As same as any other colonies which go in migratory beekeeping. In containers are always top of your colonies which go for high yields. Also beside this 30-40% colonies as back up in stationary. When some seems not quite you expect to be, replace or requeen, or add brood, or...... With each inspection we also look for signs of EFB or AFB. Since these colony numbers aren't that high ( not in thousands..) we can easily spot and react on time to prevent outbreak of some disease.. Each colony I have goes through my hands ( thoroughly) at least six times, not counting extraction -each season..
    3 points
  8. It was being destroyed but the beekeeper knew how important it was to him to have been shown the disease he decided to call around and pass on his understanding. Good guy.
    2 points
  9. science suggests that the risk from infected ground is minimal but experience has taught me that there does seem to be a risk. I always turn over the ground with a shovel if it is not possible to re-site the bees. 30 years ago I had one site that keep getting one or two infections every year and in desperation I moved it may be 20 m away to fresh ground. No more problem.. Maybe coincidence and maybe not. With foulbrood I have found that any risk is too much.
    2 points
  10. Hi @AnnaC and welcome... There is a beekeeping club in the 'rapa.. I've added our details to the directory Rob linked to above...or see our Facebook page for more information... Wairarapa Hobby Beekeepers Club - Club | Facebook We're mainly hobbyists, but someone may be able to assist with course information.. and we do occasionally get beekeeping course announcements.. Try to get along to our next meeting which will be on Sunday, 13th Sept at the Taratahi Ag Training Center.
    2 points
  11. Plums and Cherries coming on in the Waitakeres. (y) Shhhhhh first lot of Manuka flowering, purple and white ones, very soon the Waitakere Ranges will look like 'snow' has fallen. Shame for that the rain is washing out most of it :cry:.
    2 points
  12. Polyacrylamide? Crikey. Yes, used in science as a gel (used to separate DNA and proteins). Also used to poison a Canterbury professor some years ago and left him blind and in a wheelchair. His ex-girlfriend (a molecular biologist who would have had easy access to it) was cleared due to insufficient evidence I believe. Apart from that, I'm sure the stuff is fine! :confused:
    2 points
  13. Not if I'm the one who disgruntled them.
    2 points
  14. My view is that if you have to feed substitutes, then the bees are in the wrong location or there are too many bees for the forage available and the size of the apiary should be reduced.
    2 points
  15. I should add that the suspected poisoning was from acrylamide - polyacrylamide is when it is catalysed into the gel form. Still wouldn't touch the stuff . . . .again
    1 point
  16. "so for me monitoring and testing is the right approach" I agree with you - I have been treating in autumn with thymol and in winter with oxalic acid for several year, confident that generally things have been fine and have little significant issues with varroa and all my colonies have survived winther apart from the odd duff queen. However this year, I didn't do any mite drop checks (fool me) and didn't notice too much wrong until it was very late; my colonies have been absolutely hammered by varroa this year. I suspect that the mild winter meant that the oxalic acid treatment was ineffectiv
    1 point
  17. Waiting for the rain to stop to get my second treatment of OA done. Have a stack of boxes to treat with parffin wax on Thursday. Just got frames to assemble now. Bees have generally been very active the past weeks with fine warmish days. Almond, Nectarine & Plums coming into blossom. Lots of flowering cherry, magnolia & pussy willow too.
    1 point
  18. so you will need more bees so you can continue on with your experiments
    1 point
  19. if i was treating with apivar i'd go by the calendar. mainly because i don't really understand the way this chemical works. it seems to need to be planed in advance cos it needs a time to "grip" and also apivar really mustn't be present when supers go on. with all other treatments i'd go by mite numbers if you are counting or even not treat at all. keeping in mind that sugar shake is not a 100% reliable. (if your sugar is nicely powdery and the jar got hot from the bees it probably did all right)
    1 point
  20. 50% inattentiveness, the other 50% playing with hypermites, which I intend to continue with
    1 point
  21. Finished the 3rd round od OA vaporizing today. Popped the lids afterwards and all the bees are looking quite strong. 2nd brood boxes go on next fine day.
    1 point
  22. Flowers and soil | The Management Agency, National American Foulbrood Pest Management Plan New Zealand
    1 point
  23. Cheers John I will do that.
    1 point
  24. @Janice your way of doing things regarding boxes and treatments is how everyone should be doing it
    1 point
  25. I wonder if a disgruntled person can be re-gruntled ?
    1 point
  26. True, I should have said stores boxes. My actual honey boxes are not on when treatments are in.
    1 point
  27. Open browser. Click this link Swarm Removal Requests | NZ Beekeepers Forum Click "Watch Forum" near the top right. Click the email notification box and click "Watch Forum" Done Works on any device (Apple, Android, PC) with a browser and push email client.
    1 point
  28. "Concerns have been raised that polyacrylamide used in agriculture may contaminate food with acrylamide, a known neurotoxin." Sounds great :what:
    1 point
  29. I appreciate that Don I do have the book and a DECA However I dont recall the reference in the book pertaining to my exact questions. The issue is bigger than the book and I will continue to seek answers beyond the scope of the book. It is also interesting to hear other peoples views on the matter, including yours which are valued
    1 point
  30. no, not all .... i'm trying to tidy up an deceased estate ... and it's not going well, all I can advise is that you or your families Last W & T is water tight, don't be a prude, and not discuss this vitally important document amongst close family, make sure you know where equity in any relationship, and who owns it ( such as a partner having inheritance assets ) Also realize that WINZ, will hound you every inch of the way
    1 point
  31. that used to be my view as well and probably most beekeepers saw it that way. but it is becoming more a question of either giving up beekeeping or living with overstocked apiaries. there is no more ethics about invading other apiaries. if you tell a landowner you consider 100 hives on his block is pushing the limits then he will reply that an other beekeeper has offered to put 300 there at $50 a hive. many new commercial beekeepers have farming background and the feeding of supplements to improve production comes natural for them and the advertisements of the those who sell the stuff is real
    1 point
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