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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/08/15 in all areas

  1. Brilliant info, thanks Tudor. My one small nuc got off to a really rough start with heavy varroa infestation, then got completely robbed out, madly treated & been feeding over winter. Checked last week, looks very healthy, no afb seen, Varroa count only 1! and numbers have boomed with honey stores back again. Feeling optimistic & very proud for my tough warrior girls. Looking forward to experiencing my first honey flow this year
    5 points
  2. Did a trip up the Inland road to pick up some boxes 600 Ks one tank of gas go the Hilux 50 boxes to whip up . Took the gun for a nice walk up some hills good for the sole not the belly . Came home and was a nice day checked on one hive I wanted to breed from dead ###### used Maqs last year did a oxalic acid dribble last month not sure if I over cooked it but other hives are still ticking along. Boxes look good
    4 points
  3. This mesh is breathable and tough. I dont use landing boards now but have some of these meshes on hives with landing boards. My bases are all fixed to the bottom brood box with a couple of screws. Some of my boxes have a partition in which case a third spacer strip is placed along the middle of the floor over top of the shiplap join and the hive then has 4 of these doors.
    4 points
  4. The weather has just been too good, 17 and sun with no wind, so opened the hives up. Every hive has another full frame of brood and all queens are laying to the corners of the frames. very pleased. Also drones in most hives and sealed drone brood in all. looking great for grafting in a weeks time.
    3 points
  5. Thought this maybe of interest to those genuinely interested in MAQS. I sought the authors permission prior to posting; Thank you for contacting us! The one strip method is registered in the USA and Canada. It was not originally part of the New Zealand registration and would require an amendment to the label. At this time we are putting our efforts toward a new formulation that will be registered in New Zealand in the next year or so. The one strip method is tried and tested in North America, and is the favourite dosage used. Personally I use this method the most, unless my mi
    3 points
  6. Thanks Trevor but not i wasnt referring to the map at all, but rather notice from AsureQuality of a recently confirmed hive...and yes the grapevine confirmed it before the letter arrived so a good reliable heads up i think.
    2 points
  7. If the local distribution is widespread you would think it's been around awhile. If the distribution is localised the chances are it hasn't. We could also try to look at the genetic variety in what we've got, if that differs from distant samples the differentiation has taken time. If it's exactly the same... I'd have thought we can do some quite useful stuff with the samples we can get.
    2 points
  8. So if i was selling Manuka honey Could I have a trademark eg TFM and put a 5+ In the circle with the 5+ meaning it took 5+ days for the bees to gather this honey? .
    1 point
  9. I have trained myself to sleep while working. Very time efficient now(y):whistle:
    1 point
  10. Neither is Manuka honey. It is a product derived from a botanical species My understanding - correct me if I am wrong, I am no expert - Manuka is a Maori word. In that sense it could be viewed the same as "champagne". That expensive stuff in the jars is not labelled as leptospermum honey!
    1 point
  11. Not quite the same champagne/sparkling wine is not a botanical species.
    1 point
  12. Yep, Part of engineering training. We get taught all about cutting edges and angles. A rather large field.
    1 point
  13. in that context i think it would pay to have a closer look at those mites i had by the 10 of million in my hives last autumn. they could play a key role by spreading cororapa from hive to hive by flowers.
    1 point
  14. Gee the stuff we learn on this forum... Who'd 'ave thought.... (y)
    1 point
  15. ...and we are all aware that flowers have been shown (since at least 1994) to be a natural reservoir for many pathogens aren't we. In this context specifically, both nosemas and our friend formerly known as Crithidia. This particular reference is new, quite apposite I guess, but there are several much older ones: Parasites in bloom: flowers aid dispersal and transmission of pollinator parasites within and between bee species. Peter Graystock, Dave Goulson, William O. H. Hughes. Royal Society Proceedings B, Published 5 August 2015.DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1371 (Paywalled)
    1 point
  16. Time, what a valuable resource. Ive decided that for me to have more of it I need to start earlier and finish later, maybe have one break instead of two. It all sinks in when you start making gear, 300 mats require 1200 individual sides and 300 bases require 600 spacer strips and 600 feet.
    1 point
  17. This could change...
    1 point
  18. So why are they getting away with calling it Manuka anyway? Aussie tea-tree might be leptospermum, but Manuka it aint.
    1 point
  19. I do not paint mine.I just dip in parrafin.I picked up a few bottom boards that had been soaked in creosote.Not a good way to go.Still smell the stuff after 20 yrssitting outside.I also cut the landing boards off.If you watch the bees,when the grass gets too long in front of the hive the bees land on the box and walk down.
    1 point
  20. Thanks @JohnF Here's a question for (probably) @Don Mac What controls the import of flowers?
    1 point
  21. Too right Dave. So when we did the first tests, we pulled out some older samples from our commercial testing bank (where we'd already seen high Nosema ceranae and apis) and confirmed the Lotmaria was wider spread than just the Coromandel (hence Cororapa. . . .Coro-central-rapa-east was a tad unwieldy). As an aside, the idea of using genetic variation as an tool for diversity was developed by a New Zealander: Allan Wilson (a centre of excellence is named after him here in NZ). Yes, we could look at the diversity - it would also tell us whether we have multiple introductions (from many y
    1 point
  22. If you are meaning that you apairy is showing Red on Apiweb, then that means that AFB was found within 3 km of you site within the last 2 years. Not really very reliable information. However, as beekeepers we should all be keeping a very close eye out for AFB. and other diseases.
    1 point
  23. Waitakere - and keeping a very close eye out for AFB given its within 5km of me. With all the challenges our bees have to face from all angles..(nature AND humans) .its a wondrous thing they ever survive.
    1 point
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