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  1. As it is not totally possible to prevent swarming or catch all swarms, swarm trapping should be encourage. Yes, permission should be sought as a common courtesy as you are on private property. This is a form of disease monitoring and control. The catcher will have to destroy the hive if AFB is found. Hopefully in the system of reporting AFB, the new site and where the bees were acquired will be noted for potential data collection. Just a thought. Maybe we can have a GPS location of swarm caught or swarm trapped in the forum. Note if queens have certain markings, etc. This is when the microdot
    5 points
  2. I recently had the opportunity to turn down an offer for more work from a start-up company getting into the local aged care service industry. To cut a long story short they were somewhat perplexed and miffed at my pricing as their overheads were considerably higher than my total charges. What I'm saying is; depending on how you structure your overheads will determine your prices and volume to stay in business. I don't own a flash house or a new car but I have a great life that I enjoy with the people that I love.
    5 points
  3. Also, It is the total package. Not everyone just works their normal job. Many people do supplementary job's to top up their main income. Many of us have a few spare hours each week that we can use profitably. No-one says that beekeeping has to be our full time job and income. If we are happy breaking even or just earn an extra few hundred $$$'s what is wrong with that. I for one don't ever want my beekeeping to be my income otherwise I don't have a hobby. But I can still sell bee products on the side as long as I do it legally.
    4 points
  4. I experimented with a wax drone foundation last season. It was when the flow was on, so they filled it with honey.:rofl:. I got a good giggle out of that. Big fat cells of capped honey it was.
    4 points
  5. Tristan, you miss our point. Yes, they are big farmers markets, and yes, people sometimes have other income streams as well. But not everybody needs a lot of money to live. Some are happy to work at their own pace and just make enough to get by on, and do without the frills.
    3 points
  6. Likewise at the Dunedin Farmers Market. Lots of customers every week and if you've got what they want you can make a living selling on a Saturday morning. Maybe not an Auckland living, but most of us are fine with a bit less. Our mortgages are smaller for a start.
    3 points
  7. Not sure why you are so obsessed with what others consider a satisfactory income. For you general information worldwide small holders - those that are utilising small parcels of land to crop, raise some form of stock, or some such seldom make all their income from a single product, crop or some such, and it is these people that utilise farm door sales or true farmers markets. Often offering seasonal product, which of coarse could be honey, although due to its nature it can be sold at any time of the year. I PERSONALLY know traders at the Whangarei market that work "on the land" during the week
    3 points
  8. Actually the discussion what primarily about "farm door" sales, the discussion about survival income seems to be your slant on the original posters more broad reaching post. Oh and I personally know a number of market sellers in Whangarei who do very well thank you - hopefully that clears up your doubt
    3 points
  9. Actually at the Whangarei weekly markets there are a number of traders who only grace this market and make their income from same, we all have different perspectives as to required income.
    3 points
  10. You don't need a $200 000 exacting plant as long as you have a approval of your local district council and they come and inspect your honey room / house and keep record I know one lady that has a little room on the back of her garage and sell down the local market
    3 points
  11. I had a brand made by Dave at Taipa Welding - www.taipawelding.com in the Far North. He did a great job for a very reasonable price. Also had hive forks made there for lifting hives with my crane and other odds and ends - I know he's made stainless pressure tanks for sugar feeding too. Better to support locally if you can I reckon.
    2 points
  12. Agreed. About the only way to confirm that would be by DNA analysis, and that from a living certified descendent of the British Black. Brother Adam gave them up, if I'm not mistaken, after the wipe-out and started his own discovery and breeding programme that would lead to the Buckfast Bee. Would that we had more Brother Adams today, he was one of a kind.
    1 point
  13. Or maybe step up the hive management to prevent swarming. Cant catch em if they stay at home
    1 point
  14. Is that when you dump them in front of it and they walk in?
    1 point
  15. I have swarm boxes out, but I never put them anywhere without permission! You can't just go traipsing around on someone else's property and taking bees, if I knew whose they were I would definitely ring them and ask if it was ok. And I would ask the landowner if it was ok. Most people can't be bothered with them and are more than happy for someone else to deal with them! It is a bit cheeky, but I suppose once they're out then they're fair game. If you see it as an issue perhaps you should put your own ones out at your sites.
    1 point
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