Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 26/10/20 in all areas

  1. A bit of pirate beekeeping over the weekend and we’re just about finished the first round of supering up, thats quite early for us.
    11 points
  2. My first swarm call of the season. Pretty happy that it's the end of October (last year was in the first half of September!). This was quite a big swarm.
    10 points
  3. The problem with the Queen Introductions into those 20 splits was almost certainly candy issue, and that places the blame with person who supplied the Queens. Candy should not go rock hard. Probably, there wasn't enough Inverted Sugar in the Candy. There is an art to making Candy, and it is important to get it right. Honey Candy is the most fool proof, you can err on the side of being too firm, and it will still pull enough moisture to keep it soft enough so as not to slow down the release of the Queen. Honey is so good because almost all the sugars in Honey have been inverted by the bees,
    9 points
  4. Collected a few more pollen samples for a research project today. Lots of hawthorn pollen and a bunch of others I'm still hoping to learn about... There's some dark purple/blue tree fuchsia pollen there too. Kind of looks like mouse droppings...
    9 points
  5. Makin more nucs again.... these bees were knocked down to singles last week.... and today ‘spare’ brood sitting above the queen excluder is popped into nucs to cover anticipated winter losses. Two frames of brood n bees and a frame of honey
    8 points
  6. Interesting thing happened yesterday, one of those things that are sometimes classed as a mystery. Three weeks ago at a site I split 4 very strong hives in fear they would swarm. Did it by finding the queen and moving her with about 1/2 the hive to the new hive, and giving the parent hive a queen cell. Went back yesterday and decided to take a peek in the hives that got a cell. each of them had mature brood, plus other brood in all stages. There had been a laying queen there the whole time. Oh, I thought I must have messed up and somehow got the queen in the wrong split
    8 points
  7. Not a lot so far on the west coast, 5 out of 20 I checked today have filled up the top box and we're half way through the manuka flow, 4 more fine days left and were back to rainy thunderstorm weather. Good news is one of the commercial outfits have just moved in so they've missed the first half and it's not looking too good from here atleast I'm looking like I might cover costs.
    8 points
  8. If you do find out, first thing to do is send them an invoice for damages. Make it realistic - i.e. fair values but make it complete, travel, time etc cost of digging hole.... At this point you have established a cost. The beekeeper may actually decide to pay the bill. I have experienced this. If they don't, they are now very aware of the cost to someone else that their actions (or lack of) have caused. At this point if they refuse to pay, you can take them to the disputes tribunal. The cost is low, tribunal is less like a court and more like an arbitration. Depending on how
    6 points
  9. ???Young travelers. We don't have any and we are absolutely loving it. The Selwyn District Council riverbed camping grounds are the nearest to ChCh airport, and it is great just to see NZers using them (for once, without heaps of dunny paper deposited with excrement by young travellers on riverbanks). The refuse on the side of roads (mattreses, cooking gear, china, 2 minute noodle packs) previously ditched between Leeston and ChCh Airport, prior to returning the rental van tidy and clean, is no longer evident. One less expense for ratepayers to fork out, and a wonderful opportunity for our
    6 points
  10. Don't want any weeing. When they go onto a flow, these cups I think will cease. Inspected hives in the Lincoln area a few days ago and could definitely smell the clover flow; although this is earlier than other years. Bees happy in grafting yard today, despite massive winds & not much jelly, & I thought with the noise the roof was going to be ripped off the grafting shed. One of the most difficult grafts in 20 years. Will be interesting to see acceptance tomorrow. When I lifted the queen of the frame to be grafted, gusts blew queen away out of my fingers. Fortunatel
    6 points
  11. Trip out to rural Putaruru to collect this swarm. Actually you only need to drive 5 minutes out from the center of Putaruru township and you’re rural! 10 minutes and they are all in the box. Another 10 framer of bees.
    6 points
  12. Aah ... we are supering up in anticipation of something .... I’m tooo dumb to do anything else.
    6 points
  13. We know another couple well, they keep bees about 20km from here. He is a pharmacist, she works in an office in town, they have 6 colonies on their property. He decided to just keep a kit around 'just in case', the type where you have to draw into a syringe then inject. His rationale, if anybody around was having a reaction, he is well versed in how to do the process and apply the injection, so no need to spend the extra on the auto-injector. Wind the clock forward 4 years, they are out in the bee yard one Saturday afternoon and he got stung, has never had a reaction in the past
    6 points
  14. Here are notes I made re: observations hives some time back: Observation hives... I've used a variety of observation hives, including a 1 frame 'portable', a 2 frame not quite so portable and a 4 frame vertical. And I agree with Kerry Clark - the 4 frame was without doubt the best for a permanent location. The 2 framer I only ever used as temporary - run out and grab a few frames, one with honey, one with brood. Find the marked queen to put on it. And brace it well in the car (it was perspex...). One design (Russian?) that always intrigued me
    6 points
  15. Ive got a story I bit like that. Happened last year. My veil at the time was getting a bit second hand and had a moderate size hole in it but not too much of a problem in spring when the bees are usually reasonably polite. One of our yards has a big Pukatea tree right beside it and while I quite like Pukatea's for their abundant pollen which nicely fills the gap between gorse and willow eairly and everything else later in spring this particular tree happens to be a favorite for swarms. It's quite tall and not particularly easy to recover swarms from. Anyhow one day about this time
    6 points
  16. I went to an extra ordinary meeting this afternoon , called by Mountain River , to whome we sell our venison weaner deer. The meeting had nothing to do with honey, but was quite interesting in that it has everything to do with marketing honey. Back in the autumn we didn't buy weaner deer to take through the winter and fatten as the writing was on the wall that with Covid the market was gonna be pretty tough this time of year. No kidding. The venison market in the US, where most of our produce goes has fallen off 80%. The gist of the meeting was that if we co
    5 points
  17. EpiPen costs 120 and lasts in excess of 12 months usually. That's nothing near the 320 you estimated. You order them online from Queenstown with free nationwide delivery, which means no trips into town. Additionally ACC would reimburse you had you used it on the guy who was choppered out, or anyone else. Not everyone has a history of being allergic. You could have had 200 stings before with nothing and sting 201 causes a reaction with no prior history. However it's turning into an interesting thread now because it's highlighting the sheer lack of
    5 points
  18. If I was moving up to 500 colonies, I would want the Cowan 28 extractor with the Silver Queen uncapper. We currently have no plans to move up to that sort of scale and have built our extracting around a Mann Lake 18 frame radial unit. The other bit we did when we built our new honey shed, we put in a small room well insulated for storing honey prior to extracting. We call it the 'warm room', but in fact it's more like a 'warm closet', set up to hold 100 supers max. This year was the first time we stored honey in the warm room prior to extracting, and kept the temp in there arou
    5 points
  19. Last night I was talking to my mate over in Canada. Sold his crop of Canola honey to the Co-op for $6.21/kg.. NZD. So when a local packer offers me $3.00/kg for clover with no Terramycin I think that's a bit rude .... Just saying !
    5 points
  20. Grant you are correct. You have to tell a story about your honey, either by talking about it or on the label and you have to be committed. I sit outside the Greymouth Library every Friday and sell my honey, rain, hail or sunshine.Sometimes i make money other times I don't but my customers know nI will be there and i can tell them what is flowering and when up and down the coast. They appreciate that.
    5 points
  21. I am far away from You.. But I hope it won't be rude to give my experience.. One year I got decent crop and that year middlemen decreased the price. Some even after the price is settled wanted to decrease money they have to give ( mainly now to me looks like they got organized and gave similar or same prices). I was desperately low on money, but I bite the tongue and said NO. I didn't want others laugh at my misery. Next season it was really catastrophic season and I sold all the honey for a fair price - ( I was glad that were beeks which were struck also with bad season, not the pure middlem
    5 points
  22. Any prudent beekeeper expects to make a loss some years, usually because of adverse weather conditions but poor honey prices have occurred before as well, in fact for a long time they were the norm. I have had the luxury of some good years and can survive a bad year but if I was to lose a thousand dollars a hive it would be the end of me in one go .Oha is not the only company haemorrhaging millions and I just cannot understand how banks and shareholders can keep propping them up when they have no hope of ever making a sustained profit. In the meantime they are wrecking it for the rest of us.
    5 points
  23. X river bed Always dry. Never have to worry about my bees getting wet! Thousands of wild flowers...
    5 points
  24. When mention healthy thing.. One man told me that his old father talked to him that all should eat all these healthy stuff and drastically reduce meat eating. He answered to him: dad, how many herds of lambs and pigs You have eaten to get to this knowledge. Let me first I eat my share of herds and then we will talk about it..
    5 points
  25. I too have seen rock hard candy, made by the no honey method. I think the problem was most likely the candy. Me, I make my candy with honey. Failproof. Leaving a hive or split queenless overnight before planting the introduction cage is a non issue best I can tell. You will see the bees immediately converge excitedly on the cage and start nasanov fanning, you know her acceptance once released is assured. However your breeder is incorrect in saying the fault was introducing the queens straight away, that does not cause a problem provided the release time is l
    5 points
  26. Mostly it was one man, not NZ, and he was a transplanted Welshman, who did all the work, and I remember one Conference many moons ago when there was fierce opposition to a Remit at the AGM to approve a 25 cent per hive levy to to fund fund his research and the marketing around it. Up until that point you rarely heard the word Manuka used in NZ as well, Manuka and Kanuka were just referred to as Teatree or scrub.
    5 points
  27. I've put some resources up, including a free online training program at
    4 points
  28. James, I think that rata, a good smoothly granulated rata, is one of the finest honeys in the world. While I might personally think of it as priceless, I do hope you get the price you want...
    4 points
  29. About queens.. In contrary of many here used to to. I produce the queens for me after the swarm season. During the season I use the qe with entrance. Sometimes occur in super odd new queen, sometimes it can be I shift up unnoticed some young brood but in some cases I think it come as stranded from other colonies during mating flights. So occasionally I have extra brood afterward or split, whatever I choose. Such queens I try not to leave, due to uncertain origin or quality ( removing at place or later if I make split). Also some friends had problems when odd queen fly in their cell raisers and
    4 points
  30. Dear dairy, Have been around and caged the last round of queens from the nucs with over 85% Mated helps to make up for poor mating the couple of rounds earlier with the really unsettled weather this spring.. some were mated and laying fast at 9 days the earliest. Production hives are thumping forward with Manuka flowering beginning in my area I’ll hold off for another 10 days or so before sending them into the first block to make sure there’s enough bloom coming on. Once again I’ll be stripping every drop of honey off them except one or two frames in the nest some are now at ten broods
    4 points
  31. Bremworth carpets have ditched all synthetics and gone back to all wool. A great move, hopefully our wool industry will return to days of old.
    4 points
  32. Last season I got lucky and produced some mono manuka. Just recieved a 1/2 payment for it and discovered there is still heaps of money in beekeeping, if you are making the right stuff. But yes, those guys still making the big bucks are not here telling the rest of us how to muscle in on them of course. Been struggling along on bush the last several seasons, turning a profit, but a very small one. By doing all those aforementioned things, boutique marketing in every possible way. Covid was very good for my sales. Re wool, I think it has to come back. All that synthetic
    4 points
  33. O.K so respect to the real beeks and now thanks. So much info. (Yep too much time on my hands due to a sprained ankle. I jumped over a farm gate that had lovely long grass to land on with nasty jagged rocks underneath) Anyway, I find myself revising some posts from way back. 4yrs ago DEEJAYCEE said "Next to the bees, comb is our biggest asset as beekeepers." I know that now, but so much of the lovely long,long,long, explanations of How,why,what,where and when in all sorts of situations,that is so nicely explained to a beginner can go straight up and
    4 points
  34. Hardly fair boss. We have been researching and exploring a bunch of options. How innovative does one need to be? How much resource and thought do we put into moving 10ton. Honey is marketed to death. Everyone is trying it. A Story to share. Special honey, better than others...blah I am no stuck in the mud guy. Willing to try, and share. Beekeepers on the whole are. Solutions bring it on. Just don't pitch marketing to the small beekeeper.
    4 points
  35. Not my swarm collect, but this looks a great way to do it. Pongakawa Bush Road, yesterday.
    4 points
  36. When the pressures on some big gear saves a lot of time. Nice truck .... 500 horses ....
    4 points
  37. Crazy busy at the moment with kiwifruit pollination. Been working every day for the last 2 weeks (the staff generally have the weekends off) and most of that has been in the rain !!!! Massive thunderstorms here in the last 2 days but the orchardists still want hives. BUT some of them have now decided they will either trim their shelter belts while the hives are in or just the day before. The boys had a truckload of 30 last night to go in and apart from the ground being sodden and nearly getting stuck they also couldn't get down the lane way so had to offload all of them in the loading bay at
    4 points
  38. Now that I am old, slow, and lazy, I don't feel like checking every hive every week. Nor do I want to keep making increase. Sometimes I'll find a hive that I just know is going to swarm almost regardless of what I do. They have made the decision, and they are going to do it. So my lazy mans method in these situations is kill all the queen cells except 2, and also kill the queen. You would think they will just swarm anyway but nearly always they don't. I think it is because they go into queenless mode for a few days, and that changes the dynamic and intentio
    4 points
  39. You mean on facebook? LOL, I've been getting lectured by people who have just got their first bees, or haven't actually got them yet, telling me what I'm doing wrong.
    4 points
  40. My guess is that the Instruction came from a book that is at least 100 years out of date. Leaving a hive queenless so that they are desperate for a new Queen sound like a good idea but it is not and never has been.
    4 points
  41. Nice. I never met Old Arthur ..... but my mate spent a lot of time with him. In his latter days, the story goes that Arthur wanted to see what the bees were doing up the Gorge ..... the Rakaia gorge. So old mate took him up there one day when they had a run to do. Old mate stopped at a yard to do some jobs and Arthur was left to wander. Old mate made some comment about not wandering too far, in case the time came for Arthur to meet his maker. Well, Arthur's Maker had the plan .... and the two met in the yard up the Gorge. The story goes t
    4 points
  42. Far out you guys! Talk about the village folk being out with the Pitch Forks looking to lynch someone. I have personally worked with a large number of the Comvita Branches and have found all the staff to be very good and capable beekeepers. Just like every business, there are different levels of skill and knowledge. Attack the brand name -sure, I understand that, but to have a go at the staff and the apprentice program is pretty low. In fact I’m disappointed
    4 points
  43. I took a couple of days off to pick up three Kaka from Hamilton zoo and take them out to Cape kidnappers. Can't say I was impressed with the traffic in Hamilton but had a wonderful night with Michelle and Byron Taylor and their family and on the way up to Hamilton yesterday I stopped at the Tirau Museum which several forum members have recommended. Spent quite a long time chatting with Jeff the proprietor and man does he have a collection of honey tins . He had a honey extractor which he said he used to use all the time and I have never seen one like it. Will try and post a picture tomorr
    4 points
  44. Ok. So I have split this little section off from the Swarm season thread specially for @Maggie James Here is a couple of photos of my capture buckets and the ventilated lids that I made to keep the swarms alive. The wooden lids are made with 2 layers of 12mm ply with a sandwich of aluminium flyscreen to allow plenty of air into the capture bucket. This allows air for breathing and prevents the bees panicking and stressing themselves to death. The tare weight of the bucket and lid is written on the wooden lids. 1 kg of bees equals about 9000 bees (according to Mr Google)
    4 points
  45. another possibly more likely scenario is your queens from the cells mated quickly and the sealed brood you saw was actually from the previous queen and the eggs and larvae from your newly mated queen. If the weather is ideal 3 weeks is heaps of time for a queen to mate and start laying and even have sealed brood.
    3 points
  46. Not sure why or how it's driving down the price. 3 to 5 dollars per kg bulk or 20 dollars kg in 2 jars? So the financial sale of 1 drum equals how many jars exatly? It also doesn't have to be about sitting in the rain, it could be click and collect, gift vouchers, informal tours of the honeyshed, tasting sessions, building a story, getting customer buy in to a product they want, not need. Not a 5 dollar jar off the supermarket shelf, but a 20 bux version off the local guy because he looks after xyz other farmers businesses and plays a part in the local community.
    3 points
  47. @Alastair, it’s my understanding that anyone can become allergic at any time even old timers who have been stung hundreds of times over the years .
    3 points
  48. A New business selling mead......and not hanging on Manukas coat-tail. I wish her success Wanaka entrepreneur Chanelle O'Sullivan launches mead drinks business despite Covid-19 | Stuff.co.nz WWW.STUFF.CO.NZ Wanaka entrepreneur aims to be the first to sell her new sparking mead in supermarkes.
    3 points
  49. As has been stated,Manuka is a maori word and use of the term ' manuka' has been around for donkeys years referring to the bush ,scrub watever you want to call it.To say manuka was rarely heard around NZ,im not sure wat part of the country you were brought up in but iv known about since i was a kid. Now if you are referring to the honey produced from the manuka bush...thats a different story as im not a long time beekeeper and i dont know what they referred to it back in the day. As far as I'm know,the honeys produced from the lepto scoparium are very similar if not the same and in m
    3 points
This leaderboard is set to Auckland/GMT+13:00
×
×
  • Create New...