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  1. I'm a little far away to provide physical help, ie, not likely to get to your bees even if the border was open. But, I can provide some 'been there' kind of experience to help you relax. Years ago, wife and I had our first bees, we fussed and fussed over them. They swarmed, did everything we didn't want, we kinda gave up. It was early July for us, so, roughly the same part of the season as you are in now. At that point we essentially abandoned the bees for a couple months, distracted by other priorities (our wedding and the obligatory trip after). When we finally got back to c
    1 point
  2. Detector dogs could help save bees WWW.SUNLIVE.CO.NZ Training dogs to sniff out the highly infectious bacterial disease American Foulbrood in beehives could save New Zealand’s... article on detector dogs with funding support from a number of areas/groups. Not a single word from the management agency, may speak volumes. However since taking a lot of the work inhouse and taking on new staff their stance may have changed? I didn't know "previous methods have led to inconclusive results in the field", does anyone have proof to back up such
    1 point
  3. This video might be of interest? It's the short doco on the afb sniffer dog https://vimeo.com/190422712
    1 point
  4. Yo ..... I was going to get back to this, but thought it too much info for one post. Canine Modus Operandii. Dogs do not like bees, and generally once stung, get stung shy. There is a time and place for their use. Generally the handler goes out very early morning, or late in the evening, when the bees are home. Best results are on the cooler days. Warm nights when the bees are humming at the front door are not ideal. Most of the dog work on live hives is done in the winter, spring and early autumn. In the early days we had on
    1 point
  5. Kick in the teeth ..... no not really. We initiated our dog program to solve a problem that was knawing away at us .... employing overseas staff who didn't appreciate the seriousness of AFB and so making us think outside the square to solve the problem , which we have. What we discovered was that the dogs were quite good at what they did. They aren't a one shot wonder, but a very effective tool to do large scale rapid screening ..... 800 hives in an evening session was the record I think. The kick in the the teeth was when we suggested to the industry that the dogs might be quite a g
    1 point
  6. That must feel like a bit of a kick in the teeth after all the work and $$ you put into your program. it’s a shame mpi didn’t support you then and we could be years down the track with this research.
    1 point
  7. I put our very low incidence of AFB these days to the fact that we've been running AFB dogs for a number of years ....persistent, patient pressure , screening and quarantines has paid dividends. Somewhere on the Net is Sarah Hights d oco ....'A million dollar Nose' that documents a day in the life of AFB dog Georgie. The agency was against the idea of dogs as a screening method from day one, then back tracked a few years ago to say they might consider the idea after 'rigorous scientific testing' ..... so at last someone has had a quiet word with MPI and persuaded them to fund some resea
    1 point
  8. Here's my take, and i get this not only from my own hives but also that i get numerous requests from hobbyists with near dead hives to go fix them. If the issue is mites but the queen is still alive, the hive can be fixed. First i agree with many of Christi An's comments, but if a hive only has a few sick bees left and will be dead in 2 weeks, shaking them onto new empty combs will not save it because it will be dead before they can get a new cycle of brood through. However the method may be effective in less severe circumstances, and Christi An has found that in his own experience
    1 point
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