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  2. Thanks for your response, James. As far as I am aware from research I was involved in sideways heat shock proteins, HSP70 being a dominant one, are produced temporarily in all kinds of organisms, including humans, as a result from stress (such as heat exposure) and their function has been related to relieving the stress that triggers their production. HSP production drops back gradually after the stress factor has been removed. So you are correct to be cautious, it is not a mutation, it is merely a temporary conditional expression. I am convinced HSP are are not something to worry about. Varroa selection is more dangerous if a treatment is allowing more resistant individuals to survive based on their genetic make-up. Yes, the thermal box I built is very much like the Varroa controller but I looked at many other concepts, even the (patented) solar hives. After this initial inventory I decided on the 'brood only' approach. I think it was at least in part through trial and error that I got to where I am now (many of the best and lasting inventions and 'scientific progress' happen by accident or by making mistakes, unfortunately). There are differences with the commercial instrument, such as the way warm air is circulated and also in my 'contraption' the temperature and relative humidity are not set values but can be varied. As a hobbyists who likes a DIY challenge for now I am happy if the approach temporarily brings down varroa numbers in such a way (by about a month) that chemical treatment during the time when there is still nectar flow can be avoided. And should it be unsuccessful ... I will have a box to warm up the honey frames before harvesting. .. No guts no glory. Good luck with the project! Jan
  3. I applaud that and have no criticism. But thinking aloud it gives me ideas and questions.. With regards to finding a local supplier, that's a great option. However, if I'm hankering for SI Beech Dew, or I want to try some Otira Rata, can I do that too? Neither are produced locally in Tauranga. I have tried Kamahi and I like it... and so on. I think there are a lot of beekeepers out there with no clue about websites nor online sales and no money to waste on IT and no spare time(?) and this is where the forum can help and earn $ to make things happen. Next question is how best to achieve that. And so that a bunch of lurkers actually start to use the forum. If you can sell their honey and send them a courier label, packing slip and $$ to their bank account, that is a great deal; if the bk is prepared to keep their end of the deal with prompt delivery of packed honey waiting in stock. It might even be less hassle than having their own website. So they print out this stuff at home, then call the courier following day; when ready for uplift. They could send back a photo of the parcel waiting for pickup. Shipping costs are often a stumbling block to any kind of online sales by a one man business. Pickup address should be an urban address at the beekeepers home rather than a rural address of the shed. I assume most purchasers will only want one 500g pot, with a bit of luck this will go into an A5 satchel not even requiring a cardboard box. The common break point in pricing for couriers is 5kg. It is important that the boxes do not weigh more than 5kg each. So, that is maybe 9x 500g. There is nothing to stop someone ordering 3 pots just that they will pay more in shipping than if they ordered 9 pots. Same applies if selling 4x 1kg pots. I don't really favour big pots bigger than 500g. We're trying to go for the malt whisky market not the bulk cheap bargain bin! If it does not take too long to get through 500g they can be enthused to try another flavour. In the process there are stripe fees (is paypal cheaper?) and there are fees to cover your work or that of an admin person if the job gets big enough for you to employ someone. Paypal automatically generates packing slips and Stripe probably does too. Posting 500g of honey overseas should be an option, from what I have read, but to be cost effective needs critical mass and good logistics company. So it is probably stage #2. The Daigou trade is the real prize, but first we have to learn to walk. Free listing is good and helping people to shift their honey seems good. The opportunity for the forum to provide a worthwhile service and employ people is great also. For some beekeepers it may still be a big cost to them to (speculatively) have a drum packed into 500g containers and nicely labelled, and to source some suitable cardboard boxes for up to 5kg, but if there is no cost to the listing and no compulsion sell or take orders, they might still have an email address where people can ask and give a feel for the demand there would be. If we start at $8/kg for the beekeeper and consider costs of container, packing, labels, courier and fees, can we get that nice honey into an urban pantry for the same cost or less than 9 pots of honey if they visit their supermarket? Just purchasing one 500g pot by courier is always going to cost more but this is a malt whisky option to try a particular type of unobtainable honey. Buying 9 pots of honey has to be competitive to work just like a wine club. If we can't sell 4.5kg cost effectively then we shouldn't do this because it is unlikely to get traction if the supermarket is cheaper. That takes us back to the local supplier option.
  4. Today
  5. Where’s @yesbut to do the proof reading...? There’s a doozie up there
  6. Yep they can mix. There are multiple methods of blending a high oil content food with honey.
  7. Countdown, Kilbirnie, Wellington. mother earth. Just checked their online shop to confirm and it's there too shop searchproducts - Countdown NZ Ltd SHOP.COUNTDOWN.CO.NZ Shop for groceries online and checkout great free recipes at...
  8. Yesterday
  9. I want to revamp how we help your business, whether its large or small, fully commercial or local farmers market. We've had the marketplace for you to list your products and whilst that was intended to be a farm gate type approach for those who do not have online purchase facilities, most of the attempts at sales have been for equipment or bulk honey between beekeepers themselves. So lets take a different tack on marketing your wares and try and expand that market. There have been a few discussions recently and I'd like to ask for your input on a section for local honey producers - or wax or candles, or beer/meade etc. My intial thoughts (and this has altered based on the feedback received, so thank you for that), is that we sales pitch the various types of NZ based honey and product types. Then allow the public to "find a local supplier". That then goes to a regional search that lists suppliers - YOU - and what you offer and where they can get hold of you. It would be a free service listing initially, you would create a "classified" add in the listing and put in the information of your choosing. I'm thinking there are 3 elements here. Those with no direct sales process at the moment Those with a website but only physical sales Those with a website and online sales The intention is that we can cater for and help with all 3 aspects, so that those with existing channels maintain their brand and identity. We can help by filling in the gaps through features either coming or already available on this site and help you build your brand. The difference from what we've offered previously, would be that we cater for direct sales to the public in your required format. Feedback and brainstorming ideas below please.
  10. I'm going to pop this topic in here with the beginner beekeepers because its the majority of new beekeepers that read the site and gather information to progress their learning, but feel its a daunting prospect to ask questions or provide assistance to others, so lets start by giving a few pointers. I'm not experienced enough to contribute. Sure it may be daunting to offer your opinion when all these experienced beekeepers who have been on the forum for years dominate the discussions with their opinions and ways, but while they can occasionally bark, they don't usually bite. So what can you do to join the party? A mellow way of introducing yourslef is to share your experiences, rather than asking a question or supplying an answer. Tell us how you do your beekeeping, describe your setup, tell us about something unusual. As your confidence builds and you start to form "friendships" you may like to then ask questions or even offer your input on how to do something to help out others. We're only as diverse as our contributors at the end of the day, so its important you feel like you can contribute. Complete beginners can start here with our "ask something safely" scheme Some hints and tips on using the various farts of the site, can be found at New to NZ Beekeepers Forum https://www.nzbees.net/forums/forum/32-new-to-nz-beekeepers-forum/ And the guidelines and tutorials can be found in HELP https://www.nzbees.net/support/ Our international friends, whilst keeping up to date with happenings in NZ, can tell us whats going on in their part of the world using the international beekeeping forum https://www.nzbees.net/forums/forum/28-international-beekeeping-forum/ If you have never used a forum before or can't work out how to use the site, then we have a new "I'm stuck how do I use the website?" Q&A section https://www.nzbees.net/forums/forum/48-im-stuck-how-do-i-use-the-website/ If you are into Top bar Hives, Long hives or hybrid construction, treetment free or natural beekeeping, then we have revised our section on Alternative Beekeeping Practices https://www.nzbees.net/forums/forum/35-alternative-beekeeping/ And finally if you just want to say hello, or just have a yarn then join us in General Discussion https://www.nzbees.net/forums/forum/12-general-discussion/
  11. Absolute prohibitions are not common. For animal products, many factors could be taken into consideration when an import permit is sought. The risk analysis would need to take into account: likelihood that the product carries a pathogen etc volume of the import overall volume of the individually packaged wax labeling, either promoting or discouraging a particular use value vectors by which the product might be exposed to bees if exposed, what is the likelihood of an infection Some bee products have an inherently higher risk. Think honey, think second hand bee equipment, think pollen... Others, such as processed beeswax, may be allowable in some formulations depending on potential. I think that their rationale here might be that the product: is packaged in small quantities probably has quite a high value (so would be discarded so readily, etc) has a potential to cause infection (?) I questioned that last one, as I am out of touch somewhat with the literature. Beeswax foundation, even made from wax from infected AFB hives, is considered a low risk, and EFB doesn't make such as persistent spore as AFB. I'd have to see what research work has been done to start guessing at risk of infection. Does 'no' always mean 'no'? No. Honey can be imported into NZ, for instance. You will often see it listed as a minor ingredient in other foods. But so long as it is not likely to be discarded, would not have any attraction to bees if it was, etc - and those products can be allowed into NZ containing honey... The industry has worked tirelessly to avoid the introduction of pests and diseases. But I think we'll just have to 'play the game' when it comes to specific opposition. It needs to be science based...
  12. Does wet or dry make a big difference to your access tracks. Here it makes all the difference
  13. until
    60 Selwyn St, Leeston, Canterbury 7632 One-hour tutorials commence 10.30 a.m $20 Two-hour tutorials commence 12.30 p.m $40 Attending two tutorials same day $55 with complimentary homemade soup & pie or pizza lunch, plus a NZ Beeswax goody bag NOTE: Covid-19 has forced rescheduling of some dates previously advertised 28 June One hour: Establishing & Siting an Apiary Two hours: Flower & Bee Relationships & the Pollination Process 12 July One hour: Bee Communication & Worker Tasks Two hours: Causes & Controls of Swarming & Robbing 23 August One hour: Introduction of a Mated Laying Caged Queen to a Hive Two hours: How to Make a Top Split Hive (Last year, these two tutorials delivered to Auckland Beekeepers’ Club with good feedback) More info, terms & conditions please contact: Maggie phone 027 629 9388 or email mjqueenb@xtra.co.nz Twenty-five years ago, loving the outdoors I struck on the idea of having a beehive as a hobby, and then I dived into beekeeping with gusto! I studied at Telford via correspondence. In those days Telford also offered a queen bee rearing certificate, so once I completed the apiculture knowledge cert, I launched into queen rearing studies. To complete my queen rearing cert, I was required to be at Telford for 8 weeks, and during this time there was major emphasis on stock selection, grafting techniques, and artificial insemination. Back home, my first customer enquiry to buy queen cells was for 600! I really thought it was a hoax, particularly when the guy said he was travelling from the deep south with a chocolate cake for a Saturday a.m. cuppa! Well, I got heaps of referrals from that outfit. I then shifted to Leeston, Mid Canterbury, which fortuitously coincided with the breakup of the Airborne Honey beekeeping operation. All the ABH guys were excellent beekeepers and I ended up with all of them as my customers. I was based at a large local extraction plant, hence more customers. I have great commercial referees, and some of my customers I have retained for 20 years. The local guys get smaller amounts of cells, but those from long distances generally 70 or 144. Over the years, I have produced tens of thousands of queen cells. So now I have got so much to tell regarding beekeeping, and it has come to a time to change tack and decelerate. Manage Event Report Event Download Event Add Similar Event
  14. until
    60 Selwyn St, Leeston, Canterbury 7632 One-hour tutorials commence 10.30 a.m $20 Two-hour tutorials commence 12.30 p.m $40 Attending two tutorials same day $55 with complimentary homemade soup & pie or pizza lunch, plus a NZ Beeswax goody bag NOTE: Covid-19 has forced rescheduling of some dates previously advertised 28 June One hour: Establishing & Siting an Apiary Two hours: Flower & Bee Relationships & the Pollination Process 12 July One hour: Bee Communication & Worker Tasks Two hours: Causes & Controls of Swarming & Robbing More info, terms & conditions please contact: Maggie Phone 027 629 9388 or email mjqueenb@xtra.co.nz 23 August One hour: Introduction of a Mated Laying Caged Queen to a Hive Two hours: How to Make a Top Split Hive (Last year, these two tutorials delivered to Auckland Beekeepers’ Club with good feedback) Twenty-five years ago, loving the outdoors I struck on the idea of having a beehive as a hobby, and then I dived into beekeeping with gusto! I studied at Telford via correspondence. In those days Telford also offered a queen bee rearing certificate, so once I completed the apiculture knowledge cert, I launched into queen rearing studies. To complete my queen rearing cert, I was required to be at Telford for 8 weeks, and during this time there was major emphasis on stock selection, grafting techniques, and artificial insemination. Back home, my first customer enquiry to buy queen cells was for 600! I really thought it was a hoax, particularly when the guy said he was travelling from the deep south with a chocolate cake for a Saturday a.m. cuppa! Well, I got heaps of referrals from that outfit. I then shifted to Leeston, Mid Canterbury, which fortuitously coincided with the breakup of the Airborne Honey beekeeping operation. All the ABH guys were excellent beekeepers and I ended up with all of them as my customers. I was based at a large local extraction plant, hence more customers. I have great commercial referees, and some of my customers I have retained for 20 years. The local guys get smaller amounts of cells, but those from long distances generally 70 or 144. Over the years, I have produced tens of thousands of queen cells. So now I have got so much to tell regarding beekeeping, and it has come to a time to change tack and decelerate.
  15. Mt climbing on a bike now that's how i would do it- but it would have a motor
  16. In this case importing beeswax dosen't mean NO
  17. This was on the Zoji La .... young and mad! Enroute to the Sacred Mountain
  18. Yep ....spent most of my youth climbing .... North Wales on weekends , winter ice in the Cairngorms, summer s at Zinal in France, then into the Italian alps with my mates Jamie and Malcolm. Never went down to the Dolomites, but my cousin did and took quite a fall, then hit paradise in New Zealand and the southern alps , couple of weeks at Yosemite plus a few forays into the Himalaya. Well there ya go ....That was back in the good old days . It all took a back seat when bee numbers started to grow and I took a wife ! The young fellah lost my Iceaxe in a 'Glory hole' in the creek a year or so ago when he was digging for gold and the crampons are under the bed. The dog has commandered the sleeping bag and the tent has long rotted. But like Sir Ed said once "I still get a buzz just seeing the snow and ice in the gullies from afar".
  19. Once I gave sample of my black locust honey to one company buyer at large. They return the answer that in my honey is too much of pollen of false indigo-bush. Area where it grows was nearest about 20km. The few plants if somehow were somewhere near cannot influence the black locust honey so much. They tried to reduce the value of my honey. I declined their offer, next buyer at large said samples were OK for black locust and paid rightful price.. At the moment I felt pride cause my bees travel for forage 20 km and bring honey and pollen back to hives..
  20. That is the only scientific way to tell exactly what the honey is.
  21. No . But I am pretty sure that when I take a newly capped frame off in the first week of dec that its pretty much all kamahi . There is the odd other thing flowering but it is very common here and has such a strong flowering every year . But a pollen test would be good .
  22. HAve you had a pollen analysis done on your Kamahi at all?
  23. So how many hands does it go through to get to the consumer
  24. I think my friend who owns bio honey has someone who is a honey buyer who sorts that. I am going to see if they could carry kamahi. When I offer honey to my friends a lot really like kamahi . I think the kamahi up this way is different . There is no quintinia in it and maybe in the north island it is a blend . We can get pretty pure kamahi here . I think a problem would be that it granulates with a really coarse grain .
  25. Hi @NatureAlley, Firstly just want to acknowledge your efforts, and that is some impressive engineering to get 0.3C variation. Am I right in assuming you used this product as the inspiration?: https://www.varroa-controller.com/ We also haven't come across many studies related to resistance to high temperature. Have you read these papers? Heat shock proteins in Varroa destructor exposed to heat stress and in-hive acaricides (we have reviewed the full text, and yes HSP70 response increases with elevated temperatures, they don't really conclude much except more studies need to be done, and that seasonal temperature fluctuations should be considered to maximize the effect of acaricides and minimize costs and residues of controlling mites. They reference this research in moths https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4314281/ that talks about the Trade-off between thermal tolerance and insecticide resistance, which if applicable to Varroa, could mean in the future thermal and minimal pesticide could work well in tandem. Insect Heat Shock Proteins During Stress and Diapause (Not arachnids) We do hope to get an entomologist involved at some point (after we have ascertained product market fit), it's unclear to me whether the HSP70 increase is permanent response from thermal shock, or just a rapid survival process that dissipates, and whether the mutation (sorry probably not the right word for it) gets transferred to some/all subsequent generation Varroa. You have got me thinking about how answering some of these hypothesis, could be a good research project for one of our Universities, especially given the unique NZ industry and product, although I also wouldn't be surprised if we start to see more papers flowing in from international establishments. Your highlight about running a relevant test is something in the back of our minds as well, as you know it needs to be done at scale, with good controls, and possibly blind (unbiased), to get truly representative data. Which is another issue with the thermal treatment products we have seen, generally more anecdotal than scientific. Thanks for your input and sharing your experience and concerns. -James
  26. I used that 0800 number that Nick supplied earlier this year to report Indian honey for sale on trademe, was the correct number to use , getting the listing removed from trademe seemed to take a couple of days though.
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