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Electric wax embedder - faster this time :)


In my last video on frame making the wax embedder was terribly slow. So I've made a new one. Runs at 50VAC from an isolation transformer. There's a push button to start embedding, a timer to shut off automatically and a trim pot to adjust the length of time. Arduino powered of course :)
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nice! 50vac is keen, I run around 25-28 volts DC and that's getting pretty fast for me, however I use quite a thick gauge stainless.

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[USER=2461]@beefree[/USER] yeah that's the lowest tapping combination I can get from this transformer. I use 0.5mm stainless wire. The timer is essential.

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You could pulse width modulate the 50v, in other words use a ac monitor speed controller or may get away with a dimming light switch if it can handle the current and low voltage to control volts if necessary.

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[USER=2461]@beefree[/USER] if I was judging the melt by eye then I would do that for a slower embed. With the timer I can do it a whole lot quicker and with no chance of over doing it

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Great tool you made there Rob. 50vac is pretty keen, that's the lower threshold for high voltage. Have you checked you aren't over powering the tranny? I worry that if you are, it will eventually fail and short out internally putting 230vac though your embedder. Easiest way to avoid being electrocuted if it fails would be to make sure you power it through an RCD on the mains side of the tranny. Check the RCD every time you use the embedder. RCDs can fail too. Better yet would be power it from a battery.

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[USER=5322]@GoDamit[/USER] 50VAC is the upper limit of extra low voltage and the low limit of low voltage. High voltage is over 1000VAC. Thanks for your concern though. The transformer is an isolating transformer. The armature is earthed and the supply circuit appropriately protected. The power dissipated during embedding is within the rated capacity of the transformer.

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If you're reading that from wiki, that page kinda contradicts itself. "The term [B]high voltage[/B] usually means electrical energy at voltages high enough to inflict harm on living organisms." That's what I was taught in my EST class, and 50 volts was the line between low and high (or safe and potentially deadly) voltage. We all know 110vac is easily enough to kill a person. What some people call high voltage depends on the context of the application. "In electric power transmission engineering, high voltage is usually considered any voltage over approximately 35,000 volts." Fuses protect wires from overheating, they do nothing to stop humans being electrocuted.

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An earth leakage fault can kill a person without blowing a fuse and an isolation transformer can short to secondary and not ground transferring mains voltage to the "low voltage" side. Best/easiest safety is an RCD. That's why they're in all new switchboards by law for the last couple decades.

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[USER=5322]@GoDamit[/USER] I am a registered electrician. My definition of low voltage is taken directly from the Electricity Safety Regulations 2010. I applaud your want to make things safe. If you want to learn about electricity law in NZ then start with the Electricity Act, then the Safety Regs then the Wiring Rules. When you've done that I'm happy to debate the appropriate use of RCD in various installations.

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Apologies if I came across like a know it all. If any of my statements are wrong or misleading please correct me. I've had substantial experience and some book/tutor learning about pixies and how they chooch, but sounds like you know more. As I mentioned, great tool you made. (y)

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