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New Invention - Flow: Honey on Tap Directly From your Beehive - YouTube

beefree

How on earth does this work??
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Could this be commercially viable or just some hobbyist novelty? I got two concerns with it, if the honey is allowed to flow out, how does it have time to evaporate and thicken? Also ain't the curing process of honey important for taste?

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It could be commercial viable if you want to be mobile, collecting specific honey from flowers. However I think it is perfect for home owners. We don't know about the curing until we can compare with the standard method. But I would be more concern that this method would make "lazy beekeepers" that won't regularly check the inside hive for the health of the bees. The way this does it, I think each frame has a "drain" from each honeycomb that leads to the bottom to the pipe and thus flow out. So the honey only flows out when taps open and when you reckon there are sufficient honey in it to have a good flow that would be few hours. Ingenious thinking. Would be interesting to know what the bees reaction would be to a 'capped' honeycomb that is emptied via the "backdoor". Plus if removing a frame, wouldn't the honey flow out as well?

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There is an existing topic at [url="http://www.nzbees.net/forum/threads/flowhive-honey-on-tap.5763/"]Flowhive: Honey on tap | NZ Beekeepers Forum[/url]

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You wouldnt need to worrie about the fermentation of the honey which comes out because to me it looks like you pull a tap when the frame is anout to be capped then the honey flows into your jar

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Im not convinced that capped honey would flow out under any circumstances, Its capped therefore held in by vacuum. Uncapped nectar on the other hand would flow out like water

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[USER=2699]@King Bee[/USER] you are correct that capped honey is held in by vacuum, however because half side of the cells will move vertically thus breaking the vacuum, the honey will flow.

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[USER=2988]@Gerardic[/USER] You will need to describe that in more detail before I will believe it. The cells slope upward, the cap is the cap, a vacuum is a vacuum. The only way to break the vacuum is to break the cap seal.

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[USER=2699]@King Bee[/USER] The cells actually slops downwards in this design. The whole frame is made including the cells. A cap and a vacuum is not going hold the honey if the walls of the cell moves and "break apart" As you can see in the picture below, how the cells in the frame that is "opened" looks different to the one that is yet to be opened and full of honey. [url="http://www.honeyflow.com/gallery/p/23"]Gallery - Flow™ Hive[/url] Shows better picture of each frame and how it is drained.

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I cant wait to see it although I do have some strong opinions on the likelihood of such a hive ever being accepted in law.

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[USER=2699]@King Bee[/USER] "in law"? Why? Our only laws regard frames (specifically brood frames) to be removable so they can be inspected. How could this be illegal?

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[USER=1735]@Nick Spoon[/USER] If the average competent bee keeper had a hive like this it probably would't represent a problem at all. However its likely that these will be marketed to, and indeed would attract significant interest from people that wouldn't otherwise be interested in beekeeping. For many, these hives, above all, will represent cheap easy honey. You can bet your last dollar that behind this novel idea is a substantial marketing plan. I haven't actually stated my point here but Im sure some beeks can work it out.

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Also, given bees propensity for propolising everything, how long will the mechanisms hold up. Clearly has appeal, over 2 million raised and one can see why, but personally I reckon a lot of people are going to be very disappointed great marketing, video has pure "honey", no wax or impurities of any kind and more impressive, no other insects inspecting the free food on offer! Given it takes about 5 minutes of serious winding an extractor to clear a frame of cured honey and that in a shed of 35degress to keep the honey liquid, this is nothing short of miraculous :)

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It actually reminds me of the bloke that invented that little engine and marketed the shares door to door. Anyone who new anything about engines could see its limitations but many couldn't and poured money into it. Where is it now? Nowhere, just like this ridiculous thing will be in a few years. Like In said before, It will probably be outlawed here and so it should be

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