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MAQS on a single hive


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A few of weeks ago I culled a load of drone comb on one of my weak hives, after inspection and uncapping about 200 drone cells I noticed quite a few Varroa mites (about 7 or 8 in total) nestled within the cells and casually scuttling about over the comb. I decided this amount probably warranted treatment so I ordered a box of MAQs which arrived a few days ago.

 

This weekend I decided to open up my remaining hives and cull all the drone comb from the other 4 hives and checked, for the best part I couldn't see any Varroa activity and was just wondering if its worth a precaution treating the few weak hives whilst leaving the strong active ones alone.

 

I also noticed that the instructions for MAQs states that you should treat all the hives at the same time. Has anyone treated a single hive amongst the apiary? or do you think I should wait until the Autumn and treat all the hives at the same time.

 

Unfortunately I had to buy the 25 box of MAQs as its was the only size anyone had available, with the strips all dates for May 17 so I don't mind treating the selected hives now and then the whole apiary again in Autumn.

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Over to you really. I would probably treat them all as that stops/prevents re-invasion from the other hive.

The advantages of MAQS is that the varroa do not get resistant to it, it will kill the varroa in cells and it only takes 1 week. Remember the 10 day withholding period.

 

I would prefer to treat them all at the same time, just concerned that the longer I leave it the more infested the weaker hives will get. I'm culling drone comb every 3 or so weeks to try and slow them down. I won't be harvesting honey probably until mid Feb so the withholding period shouldn't be an issue.

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I would prefer to treat them all at the same time, just concerned that the longer I leave it the more infested the weaker hives will get. I'm culling drone comb every 3 or so weeks to try and slow them down. I won't be harvesting honey probably until mid Feb so the withholding period shouldn't be an issue.

Sometimes you need to treat even when it doesnt suit and then retreat when it is essential to ensure you have a healthy autumn/winter hive of bees. This sounds like one of those occasions. Positive with using MAQS is the need to change chemical type is not required and it is a quick treatment period.

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Sometimes you need to treat even when it doesnt suit and then retreat when it is essential to ensure you have a healthy autumn/winter hive of bees. This sounds like one of those occasions. Positive with using MAQS is the need to change chemical type is not required and it is a quick treatment period.

 

Totally, I just don't want to disrupt the hives that are cranking out the honey production, at least for a few more weeks.

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You can also store maqs in the freezer to extend expiry date if you can't use all 25 before may 17th

Freezing doesn't extend the expiration. The outer paper wrap will start to degrade post 12-months (expiry date noted on pail). This is the slow release technology that the bees use to control the vapouring off process. If it has been damaged or degraded post expiration there is a higher chance of damaging brood and bees. Follow the label! (y)

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I would have if I had hives then! Might be worth asking about it though - they don't know there is any more demand until you do!

 

Ecrotek did have 10 packs, however not enough people bought the small packs and they had a large write-off of expired MAQS. So it appears that now you can only buy 25 packs. Use it or loose it.
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True, But the short shelf life of the MAQS has burnt them. I don't know if they are going to bring in the 10 packs again.

Unfortunately the slow adoption of the treatment was problem, not the smaller packs. More Beekeepers are aware of it now and the early fears of hives being napalmed by the vapour have been reduced in line with a better understanding of how to use it.

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post #9 is from NOD markting manager. She says freezer is NOT fine

 

Well I'm confused then. We met Kathleen and another chap at the Mt Maunganui stop of the maqs road show last year. They gave all people who attended a pail of ten treatments that was right on expiring. We were told that it was OK for us to freeze them and use them, but NOT ok for them to sell them beyond expiry date on pail. Hence giving them away for free. We were told that provided the paper wrap (wick) was dry and intact then it was ok to keep them indefinitely in the freezer. However, if the paper became wetted out with FA then it would lead to a flash treatment and would not be safe to use. So, while I completely agree about not using the product where the wrap is degraded, I can't reconcile the advice I got in person with the posts above. So, the wick and the paper has to be good. Other advice about dates is probably not able to be put in writing..

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Well the latest response to my MAQS-ing has been more napalm like than before the things expired

@yesbut , would you please elaborate on the above comment? I have purchased MAQS to use, influenced in no small part by your enthusiastic posts, and if you have had less than trouble free and simple experiences as the above post suggests, please share ...preferably in detail.

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Well I'm confused then. We met Kathleen and another chap at the Mt Maunganui stop of the maqs road show last year. They gave all people who attended a pail of ten treatments that was right on expiring. We were told that it was OK for us to freeze them and use them, but NOT ok for them to sell them beyond expiry date on pail. Hence giving them away for free. We were told that provided the paper wrap (wick) was dry and intact then it was ok to keep them indefinitely in the freezer. However, if the paper became wetted out with FA then it would lead to a flash treatment and would not be safe to use. So, while I completely agree about not using the product where the wrap is degraded, I can't reconcile the advice I got in person with the posts above. So, the wick and the paper has to be good. Other advice about dates is probably not able to be put in writing..

 

No mistake, I indeed okayed the giveaway of product reaching expiration in a few weeks, I inspected it deemed it fine for use. However, it was to be used in the forthcoming application period, not to be kept over a long period of time. I believe I stated to freeze the product until use, given that the expiation was imminent.

Be wary of break-down of that outer paper wrap, or moisture build up in the sachet plastic wrap. That is a sign of improper storage (excessive heat) or of the expiration process.

 

Extended shelf life formulation has been registered with EPA, planning for a August 2017 launch. However more information and best use will be provided at the NZ Convention in July 2017.

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