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I was wondering about peoples thoughts on technosetbee hives? There's the obvious AFB disposal issue, but apart from that, what are they like to use? Do they have good insulation? Is moisture, condensation a problem? How do the bees respond to them? Thanks

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I've set up one as a bit of an experiment. It seems to be going really well. The bees love it and the hive numbers have exploded!

They are easy to set up and run. They come with a feeder on top which worked really great.

They are really well designed and engineered.

They are more expensive than a traditional wooden hive, but they are all interchangeable and can be used in combination with traditional wooden langstroth hardware.

Just my 2 cents worth!

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I've set up one as a bit of an experiment. It seems to be going really well. The bees love it and the hive numbers have exploded!

They are easy to set up and run. They come with a feeder on top which worked really great.

They are really well designed and engineered.

They are more expensive than a traditional wooden hive, but they are all interchangeable and can be used in combination with traditional wooden langstroth hardware.

Just my 2 cents worth!

 

Dave,

 

What is your plan if you get AFB and need to burn your hives, do you need to take them to a commercial operation to get rid of the hives?

 

Keen to know as we get this question or a regular basis.

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I was given a couple of boxes to try. (not from the importer). I did not like them. I found they were around twice the weight of standard wooden boxes. (Just my estimate as I did not weigh them).

I pulled one apart to see how they were constructed. They say they are filled with polystyrene (yes, but just loose scraps). I would have thought they would have been injected foam. The loose scraps were in my opinion a waste of time.

I did not like the holes in the rim and base edges. I found that capillary action sucked water into the walls of the boxes and when the hives were cracked open this water leaked out into the hive. (Not good).

At around $50.00 per box I thought they were grossly overpriced.

I only had the boxes on the hives for around 6 weeks and then I removed them as I was not happy.

 

JMHO.

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Dave,

 

What is your plan if you get AFB and need to burn your hives, do you need to take them to a commercial operation to get rid of the hives?

 

Keen to know as we get this question or a regular basis.

 

Good question - and hopefully one I'll never have to answer, but its best to know these things

I have a friend that runs an asbestos demo business and in the event of having to get rid of the hives he would be able to dispose of the hives in the same way they do with asbestos. I understand that they wrap everything and then incinerate it in an enclosed burner.

 

I think there would be issues in burning a plastic hive like the Technoset ones. I have heard the argument that, being plastic, they wont harbour any spores, but I wouldn't take the risk.

 

I was given a couple of boxes to try. (not from the importer). I did not like them. I found they were around twice the weight of standard wooden boxes. (Just my estimate as I did not weigh them).

I pulled one apart to see how they were constructed. They say they are filled with polystyrene (yes, but just loose scraps). I would have thought they would have been injected foam. The loose scraps were in my opinion a waste of time.

I did not like the holes in the rim and base edges. I found that capillary action sucked water into the walls of the boxes and when the hives were cracked open this water leaked out into the hive. (Not good).

At around $50.00 per box I thought they were grossly overpriced.

I only had the boxes on the hives for around 6 weeks and then I removed them as I was not happy.

 

JMHO.

Thanks @Trevor Gillbanks , - as you've used both the plastic and polystyrene hives, you would recommend the polystyrene ones over plastic? I'm interested to know as I'm using the technoset one at the moment, but haven't used the polystyrene ones.

I see that you use these on YouTube.

Do these perform well? Are they cost effective?

It would be worth me getting one to see how they go.

 

As always, thanks Trev for your experience !!

 

Dave

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Do these perform well? Are they cost effective?

It would be worth me getting one to see how they go.

I like them

They are lighter than wood.

40mm EPS100 polystyrene (so they are very good thermally)

Almost as hard as wood.

I have shown elsewhere on this forum and Youtube that I believe they are more than cost effective with wood.

Around $21 to $24 per box of No. 1 grade (the only grade) compares with around $17 to $20 for No. 1 timber.

They will last for around 40 years (in Finland).

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For me I like the design of the technoset hives and mating nucs, but I haven't actually worked with them. Having recently burnt a hive, I'm not a big fan of plastic in a hive and polystyrene would be the same. I think the burning issue would stop me buying either...

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I use both wooden boxes and Technoset ones. I have about 20 hives in Technoset boxes. I find them great. The ventilation seems wonderful over winter with no condensation as opposed to the wood ones. I was never told that they had foam in between, but just that they were two walls of plastic. I did a bit of an experiment over winter and set up Technoset boxes and wooden boxes side by side. All the Technoset hives overwintered far better. Just my observation of the few sites I tried this at.

What I like is the way all boxes can be divided up. I start nucs off as 3 frames with the rest of the box divided / closed off. Then can open it up to 5 frames, 7 and eventually 10. Works well in early spring when it's still cool. This year I tried two nucs side by side (in same box) with the divider in the middle and put the second box on top and expanded the hive upwards rather than across the box. I was then able to easily split the top box off and create another two nucs.

I like the top feeder that is also the hive mat. Feeding is easy in winter and over summer I take the plug out and scrap any burr comb into it and the bees can travel up and recycle any honey. Next visit I remove the wax and do the same again.

Personally I like having the latches on each box. I like the idea that if it was to get tipped over at least it would all stay together. Handy in these shakey times.

The entrances I also like as I can close of one side when it needs less open and touch wood I have had no issues with wasps. I also have the entrances that are just a couple of bee spaces wide that are used on the nucs.

Down side is that they are a bit heavier, but not that much. I'm a 5 foot female and have no issues with full depth Brood boxes and 3/4 honey supers. More expensive although I'm hoping that they will last a lot longer than wooden boxes so will end up cheaper in the long term, and the issue of burning a big blob of plastic. I use wooden frames and wax foundation but I'm sure there is also the same environmental issue with burning plastic frames and foundation.

Overall I'm very happy with them.

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I was wondering about peoples thoughts on technosetbee hives? There's the obvious AFB disposal issue, but apart from that, what are they like to use? Do they have good insulation? Is moisture, condensation a problem? How do the bees respond to them? Thanks

I was wondering about peoples thoughts on technosetbee hives? There's the obvious AFB disposal issue, but apart from that, what are they like to use? Do they have good insulation? Is moisture, condensation a problem? How do the bees respond to them? Thanks

Hi @Ahol, I started with 10 technoset beehives late this season, they performed so well even in the wet & windy as conditions in the manawatu that I split them all a month ago while plenty of food was available and had a 70% success rate. Not bad for a beginner. We were looking at increasing hive numbers not a honey harvest, thank goodness for that. Technoset hives are exactly as described above in others posts, give it a go you won't be sorry. Maintenance free and well insulated, ventilation, great way to feed bees with the top feeders for syrup or burr comb. @Trev mentioned the water capillary action going on in his hive, this perhaps was probably due to the wooden langstroth hive he had in between the two technoset boxes. That is why technoset has latches that can be set to loosen or tighten to prevent water driving horizontally getting in. No wet hives at my place, nice cosy healthy happy bees. Check with Assure to find out if there have been any outbreaks of disease in your area, that should help you make your decision if you are concerned about getting disease.

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