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Hi i am a newbee to this forum and not sure if there has been a previous post about this topic but here we go anyhow

So i bought a new hive 1 full deep hive full of brood and new spring queen the guy i bought it off said to add a super straight away so i did 3 weeks later i have 80 percent drawn comb and eggs and larvae up in the new brood chamber covering atleast 6 frames in the top box.

 

What i was wanting to know is as a newbee would any1 reccomend i do a walk away split and let them make there own queen or would it be better as a newbee to just add another box as a super all feedback welcome thanx

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What's the general consensus on whether this method produces good queens?

 

I'm guessing that it generally produces good enough queens (given that there are larvae the right age, or eggs) and that if it doesn't, there will be a supersedure in good time.

 

But I don't know so over to the more experienced.

Cheers

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What i was wanting to know is as a newbee would any1 reccomend i do a walk away split and let them make there own queen or would it be better as a newbee to just add another box as a super all feedback welcome thanx

i would add a honey super. preferably add an excluder as well.

the reason for not splitting is your missing a vital part, the bees. at a mere 2 boxes in strength, a beginner spitting something so weak is asking for trouble. to add to that, weak hive with end of season not far away, anything weak is fair game for robbing by bees and wasps.

going into end of season you want the hive to be strong and healthy.

 

 

What's the general consensus on whether this method produces good queens?

 

I'm guessing that it generally produces good enough queens (given that there are larvae the right age, or eggs) and that if it doesn't, there will be a supersedure in good time.

 

But I don't know so over to the more experienced.

Cheers

emergency queens can be great but can also be under fed and fail quickly.

 

 

Is a walkaway split, splitting off a nuc and letting it produce a queen naturally?

there is another version.

"walk away split" as in literally split the hive in two (ie take one brood box) and walk away, put it down and leave it.

this is a bit different to building a nuc. but of course any half decent beek would at least check the brood boxes have eggs in them (as they don't know which one has the queen) as well as food etc.

the crude version is the "blind walk away split" which is you don't bother checking whats in it. obviously that has a high failure rate.

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What's the general consensus on whether this method produces good queens?

 

I'm guessing that it generally produces good enough queens (given that there are larvae the right age, or eggs) and that if it doesn't, there will be a supersedure in good time.

 

But I don't know so over to the more experienced.

Cheers

Hey mate...I'm a newbie jus started beginnin autumn las year.From my limited experience,all my splits were poor man splits done around end of oct thru to Dec,ie swarm cells,swarm prevention ,artificial swarm...and all but one produced,IMO,OK queens.None of them have turned to drone layers.3 are 3 brood box hives,7 are 2brood box hives and of those 6 are good honey producers.

I did these type of splits because of my limited experience,mating weather this year and costs.

So yeah...good method for me!!

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Hey mate...I'm a newbie jus started beginnin autumn las year.From my limited experience,all my splits were poor man splits done around end of oct thru to Dec,ie swarm cells,swarm prevention ,artificial swarm...and all but one produced,IMO,OK queens.None of them have turned to drone layers.3 are 3 brood box hives,7 are 2brood box hives and of those 6 are good honey producers.

I did these type of splits because of my limited experience,mating weather this year and costs.

So yeah...good method for me!!

Pretty good observations for a newbie. I'll be looking to expand a little next spring and your success rate makes me think it's a good option to try out. Cheers (y)

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Pretty good observations for a newbie. I'll be looking to expand a little next spring and your success rate makes me think it's a good option to try out. Cheers (y)

I think the two biggest factors in my 'success' was the timing -weather wise as spring was ####ty and a lot of on/off rain,cold etc so Queenie's being able to get out,so held off for as long as possible to do splits.....and location being the other,despite the weather ,my area had plenty of bee tucker about from early spring and also commercial hives within bee distance.

 

Oh..sorry,also all the experience and help from fellow Beeks near and far,on this website!!(y)

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i've had good queens from walkaway splits. My impression is that the most important factor is hive strength and stores - the walkaways i've done have generally had a LOT of bees, plenty of frames of brood at all stages, and heaps of pollen/nectar/capped honey.

 

I did a walkaway split to weakness once - the queen did alright, but got superceded reasonably early on.

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