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Wildflower

NZBF How Many Days Q less before introducing new Q?

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Fixing my silly patchy hive.

 

New mated Q here soon.

Have to trash silly Q

Don't want to kill one Q then hive bees kill my lovely new Q purchase.

How many days should the hive be Q less?

Pointers?

Thanks in advance...

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I like 3 days, however, I also put caged queens into the hive as I remove the old queen. I don't want to make 2 trips to achieve a queen replacement.

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download.jpg.f15b47fcb1c42c0aaa1934250d24a913.jpg

Why not buy this book and have most of the answers for most of your queries, keeping Bees with a bit of knowledge makes it more enjoyable.;)

download.jpg.f15b47fcb1c42c0aaa1934250d24a913.jpg

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I'd have thought she already had it.....if not, into the corner with you wildflower !!

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[ATTACH=full]16324[/ATTACH]

Why not buy this book and have most of the answers for most of your queries, keeping Bees with a bit of knowledge makes it more enjoyable.;)

 

If we all just read the book there would be no point in asking basic questions. Surely half the stuff on here is a call for human interaction.

Squish the old, add some perfume and a new queen. I remember your excitement a year ago @Wildflower are you still having fun?

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If we all just read the book there would be no point in asking basic questions. Surely half the stuff on here is a call for human interaction.

Squish the old, add some perfume and a new queen. I remember your excitement a year ago @Wildflower are you still having fun?

 

AAAh. Knowledge is power, walking in the dark can be dangerous.. thats why carrying a torch is brighter.

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I like 3 days, however, I also put caged queens into the hive as I remove the old queen. I don't want to make 2 trips to achieve a queen replacement.

 

yes. But I thought the idea of the caged queen with a candy release was to achieve 2 to 3 days without requiring you to disturb the bees twice. So, there is no point in waiting 3 days and then using the candy that takes further time; that would be like doing the waiting twice over(?).

Also, if it was me (a beginner in hobby world) I would remove the old queen with the frame she is on and another couple of frames if it could be afforded and put her in a 5 frame Nuc box. If all goes bad you can revert to plan A. If all goes well you can squish that old queen and put those frames back in due course. Anyway, it may turn out the old queen can manage a five frame box more easily and/or they later supercede and/or whatever bees decide and you end up with a viable Nuc backup. If you do squish the queen, do not do this in, on or around that hive. Bees can get a bit crotchety when they smell squashed queen. I've never done the deed, but I was told a funny story about this where the bees followed the bk who did the squishing.. and an additional piece of advice is not to put your hands in your pockets such that you deposit traces of squished queen in your pockets :)

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I like 3 days, however, I also put caged queens into the hive as I remove the old queen. I don't want to make 2 trips to achieve a queen replacement.

yes. But I thought the idea of the caged queen with a candy release was to achieve 2 to 3 days without requiring you to disturb the bees twice. So, there is no point in waiting 3 days and then using the candy that takes further time; that would be like doing the waiting twice over(?).

@ChrisM There is a reason for the 3 day wait.

Day 1. Kill/remove the old queen. (eggs have been laid today by the old queen)

Day 3. Intro new queen. (All previously laid eggs have now hatched)

Day 6. New queen should be out of cage. The bees also know at this stage that the colony is beyond the stage of making their own queen and are more likely to accept the new queen as she emerges.

 

JMHO

A commercial or someone with multiple hives can afford to loose a queen and have the ability to recover. A new hobbyist may not have this luxury.

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[ATTACH=full]16324[/ATTACH]

Why not buy this book and have most of the answers for most of your queries, keeping Bees with a bit of knowledge makes it more enjoyable.;)

Got it. Obviously need to read it more!

 

 

I'd have thought she already had it.....if not, into the corner with you wildflower !!

Yep. Got it . No corners fo this lassie.

 

 

If we all just read the book there would be no point in asking basic questions. Surely half the stuff on here is a call for human interaction.

Squish the old, add some perfume and a new queen. I remember your excitement a year ago @Wildflower are you still having fun?

Thanks Gavin. Yep. Big smile from me. I am still having fun. Even more so as I learn. Sticking my nose as close as I can, into a frame of busy bees is still magic. Can't believe I now have 4 hives. This is bound to change, but how on earth did I get my fix with only 1 hive?

Perfume? ?

 

 

AAAh. Knowledge is power, walking in the dark can be dangerous.. thats why carrying a torch is brighter.

Torches hanging everywhere around here. If Internet dies then likely you will not hear from me, and I will be reading 'THE Book' Or one of my other!..

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@ChrisM There is a reason for the 3 day wait.

Day 1. Kill/remove the old queen. (eggs have been laid today by the old queen)

Day 3. Intro new queen. (All previously laid eggs have now hatched)

Day 6. New queen should be out of cage. The bees also know at this stage that the colony is beyond the stage of making their own queen and are more likely to accept the new queen as she emerges.

 

JMHO

A commercial or someone with multiple hives can afford to loose a queen and have the ability to recover. A new hobbyist may not have this luxury.

 

Thanks for taking time and explaining that.

my mentor does not wait the extra three days and we have not had a failure with acceptance (so far), actually 100% success, but he is a commercial with a lot of hives for 35yrs, so I think enough said.

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In a strong hive a caged queen is most often released in way less than 3 days I usually see them out in under 2 days and even within 24 hours

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AAAh. Knowledge is power, walking in the dark can be dangerous.. thats why carrying a torch is brighter.

But then your eyes never adjust to the conditions

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In a strong hive a caged queen is most often released in way less than 3 days I usually see them out in under 2 days and even within 24 hours

So, do you introduce the new queen on the same day as old queen removal or do you wait a few days.

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If you kill the queen yourself just put her on the top of one of the frames. The whole colony will know thsere is no longer queen within an hour or so. Then add a QC or the caged queen.

 

There is no such as 100% in beekeeping..... only temporary.

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I always remove the dead queen. I have had two hives would not accept a cell or queen. Found dead queen in the bottom, tossed her out and voila. Get rid of the old pheromone in my experience.

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So, do you introduce the new queen on the same day as old queen removal or do you wait a few days.

I've done three this season. Old queen out. In goes caged, mated queen with attendants, marshmallow and a smear of honey. All during one visit. Three out of three laying up a storm a week later.

 

Possibly of significance are that these were my own queens so no postage delays to stress them out.

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I've done three this season. Old queen out. In goes caged, mated queen with attendants, marshmallow and a smear of honey. All during one visit. Three out of three laying up a storm a week later.

 

Possibly of significance are that these were my own queens so no postage delays to stress them out.

Yes, @Rob Stockley I do both systems and both work. I was just interested in what @frazzledfozzle does with her introductions.

I think you may have a point about in house queen, rather than imports.

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So, do you introduce the new queen on the same day as old queen removal or do you wait a few days.

 

About 30 seconds after knocking off the old girl.

Enough time to get her out of my pocket nick the plastic tab off and put her in :)

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About 30 seconds after knocking off the old girl.

Enough time to get her out of my pocket nick the plastic tab off and put her in :)

That's about what I thought. 30 seconds?? were you having a slow day??:rofl::love:

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That's about what I thought. 30 seconds?? were you having a slow day??:rofl::love:

 

Nah my bee trousers have shrunk in the wash over the Christmas period so it was a struggle to get into the pocket

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Nah my bee trousers have shrunk in the wash over the Christmas period so it was a struggle to get into the pocket

Toooo much Christmas cake.

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Toooo much Christmas cake.

 

Look at me I'm an example of healthy eating I would never over indulge

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I think they've changed the Persil formula. My jeans have shrunk as well.

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In spring and early summer we push a hole through the candy so the bees have a tunnel to clear out, we want very quick acceptance this time of year, always out within 24 hours. Autumn is very different as we try to prolong a broodless period so will place up to 6 sheets of newspaper across the hole preventing the hive from having access to the candy so release time is extended to several days or even a couple of weeks,

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