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I am now giving tastes before people decide on what honey to buy, either at my place or a Fair, any it's very interesting to see how tastes vary. The most consistent is the mainly Kanuka which people love, remember that mine are all multi-floral, and are "real honey" just strained and not heated, with lots of pollen and small wax particles in them. And they all set within 6 weeks, no creaming or anything else. I used to send out an update email about honey, but don't need to as my afficianado's just email me and order a couple of "M", "S" and "Raynbirds" (check my web site for the codes), they know what they want ...

And the last crop is all but sold out - and I just hope we get a crop this year, we really need 3 weeks of warm, still, sunny weather, the hives are full of eager bees but they need nectar.

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Hahaha... Manic laughter... If only we had it that easy!!!!! My eyes are hanging out after a day of deciphering MPI5 tests... ?

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Heather honey tastes nice, however everybody has a different taste.

 

In Europe acacia honey is the main/important honey and sells on a good price(no wonder the big companies blend it all the time).

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I have friends who love Beach honeydew. My first taste I'll have to admit that the bouquet was strongly reminiscent of mouldy poo but give it a chance and it will grow on you (not sure what it will grow into). Thyme honey is another honey produced in New Zealand that used to have no market and now receives a premium. There are the odd honeys like ragwort and kowhai which I doubt anyone could like but you mustn't let your tastes get in the road of what people want. When I was doing comb honey tasting last year I noticed that the majority of my Asian customers wanted to like manuka but by far the majority preferred clover. The other interesting thing was some of my multi floral comb honey I just identified by where it came from and that was the most popular of all. I have a few yellow box trees growing here and the bees just thrash them but there is not enough for mono floral honeys.

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Did you inherit the Yellow Box trees or plant them ? I am asking because I planted a few 5 years ago, and when could i expect them to flower ?

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Let's swap a couple of pots

i would be keen to swap honey with other members

my friend down the road has lots of san pedro cactus , the bees love the flowers.

he gets a rata cactus blend that is pretty nice.

do you have the small white flowered , small leaved rata vine on the peninsular.

it forms shrubby thickets and flowers in feb/mar.

it is a great flow at that time of year, so reliable

 

 

I have friends who love Beach honeydew. My first taste I'll have to admit that the bouquet was strongly reminiscent of mouldy poo but give it a chance and it will grow on you (not sure what it will grow into). Thyme honey is another honey produced in New Zealand that used to have no market and now receives a premium. There are the odd honeys like ragwort and kowhai which I doubt anyone could like but you mustn't let your tastes get in the road of what people want. When I was doing comb honey tasting last year I noticed that the majority of my Asian customers wanted to like manuka but by far the majority preferred clover. The other interesting thing was some of my multi floral comb honey I just identified by where it came from and that was the most popular of all. I have a few yellow box trees growing here and the bees just thrash them but there is not enough for mono floral honeys.

thyme honey has long been used as a medicinal honey.

i am sure if someone looked into it like they have manuka they could find special properties in it too

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Yes, swapping is easy a post packet which would hold 2 500g pots is only $4.

Our local rata are red trees, just in flower now. Any chance of a seedling or two of the white one ?

No honey crop yet ...

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I planted them but I can't remember how long ago but it can't be more than six or seven years and they have been flowering for a few years in fact I grew a lot of seedlings last year. Mine flower really well but they do suffer badly from wind.

The last three posts are what beekeeping should be about. Really nice to read after a hard day's fencing.

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Yes, swapping is easy a post packet which would hold 2 500g pots is only $4.

Our local rata are red trees, just in flower now. Any chance of a seedling or two of the white one ?

No honey crop yet ...

Lots of uncapped and partially capped honey.

But we have had such bad weather, and wind that some days the bees are just not that busy.

I think they are eating what they bring in.

I only have 2 big hives and 3 nucs.

One of the hives had a queen that took over a month to mate and a big brood break like that leads to a shortage of foragers for a bit.

The rata is Metrosideros perforata

I can send some plants back to Dunedin with my sister .

Copes well with exposed sites and wind , I do not know how much cold or frost it can handle

 

 

Yes, swapping is easy a post packet which would hold 2 500g pots is only $4.

Our local rata are red trees, just in flower now. Any chance of a seedling or two of the white one ?

No honey crop yet ...

Metrosideros perforata | New Zealand Plant Conservation Network

Rata vine

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I have not noticed any nz honey yet in the super market. Perhaps when i get to Vancouver. What a bummer of a trip. Been sick with the flu like symptom for a few days. Staying close to the ski resorts and driving there just to see what we are missing out. Two days of skiing so far. Leaving Red for Kelowna tomorrow. At least we are moving from -31C temperature to -12C

Whats at the supermarket at Rossland.

20170107_122932.jpg.cd44a256a5e1129fac9bbd3b9d846c1c.jpg

20170107_122932.jpg.cd44a256a5e1129fac9bbd3b9d846c1c.jpg

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Aeroplanes are giant germ circulating chambers.

The more connecting flights your have the less chance you have of emerging uninfected

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Aeroplanes are giant germ circulating chambers.

The more connecting flights your have the less chance you have of emerging uninfected

Air doesn't "circulate" in aircraft. Air is pumped in at the front and along the top, it then flows down and back until it's dumped. So pay the moneys, sit up front, get off at the other end without as many germs, and having had a nice meal and a comfortable seat. Or roll back in cattle class, take your vitamins and get loads of sleep. Avoid the free alcohol too, except for the medicinal one to help you sleep ;)

@Rob Stockley The above doesn't apply to choppers with open doors, the only way to fly eh?

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Air doesn't "circulate" in aircraft. Air is pumped in at the front and along the top, it then flows down and back until it's dumped.

<snip>

@Rob Stockley The above doesn't apply to choppers with open doors, the only way to fly eh?

I can't speak for the Navy but there's plenty of (hot) air circulating along the top of the Air Force.

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Air doesn't "circulate" in aircraft. Air is pumped in at the front and along the top, it then flows down and back until it's dumped. So pay the moneys, sit up front, get off at the other end without as many germs, and having had a nice meal and a comfortable seat. Or roll back in cattle class, take your vitamins and get loads of sleep. Avoid the free alcohol too, except for the medicinal one to help you sleep ;)

@Rob Stockley The above doesn't apply to choppers with open doors, the only way to fly eh?

I flew over the bungle bungles in a chopper with no doors.

Once I got over the shock and realised I was not going to fall out the view was great .

My young son was beside me and he loved it

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I can't speak for the Navy but there's plenty of (hot) air circulating along the top of the Air Force.

I was Air Force mate, not Navy.

:eek: You don't think we'd trust the navy boys to fix a helicopter do you? We can teach them to fly but try teaching them that you don't fix corrosion by slapping on a thick coat of 2-pack epoxy paint. :rolleyes: Mission Impossible.

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Another story this one from a Tassy beekeeper I love his comment about NZ not having Manuka in isolated places and that all our Manuka is grown around paddocks.

 

Manuka is a sweet remedy

He certainly got that wrong

Because manuka grows in poor soil where nothing else does its most often growing in areas considered completely unsuitable for paddocks, badly drained infertile soils, abandoned farms etc.

In my area its kanuka that grows in paddocks .

Maybe he does not know the difference

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