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Dave Black

Aussie 'manuka'.

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kiwi fruit again

Sadly yes. I assume the statement was in reference to the (moronic) members of the kiwifruit industry who thought that selling budwood was a good idea not to me?

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On the postive side demand is increasing with diabetes and an aging population world wide with bed sores. :giggle:

 

Not to mention a complete misuse of antibiotics producing super bugs. :rolleyes:

 

I hope they do go with the name "Active Jellybush Honey" worst brand name ever.

 

Sound like the sort of thing developed by a committee.

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The Aussies can keep their active jellyfish honey :confused:

And their jelly fish.!!

 

It's hard to imagine getting anything like monofloral jelly bush honey.

All honey in Aussie tastes like eucalyptus.

Even honey labeled as something else has essence of gum,

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@kaihoka Sorry, but I have to disagree with your statement "all honey in Australia tastes like eucalyptus", sounds like you have never been to our wonderful country or tasted all the many honey varieties we produce here. Our clover honey taste just like your NZ clover honey, there are so many honeys here that have no connection to the eucalyptus tree, that would include the "Jelly Bush" honey you mentioned.

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@kailhoka, Sorry, but I have to disagree with your statement "all honey in Australia tastes like eucalyptus", sounds like you have never been to our wonderful country or tasted all the many honey varieties we produce here. Our clover honey taste just like your NZ clover honey, there are so many honeys here that have no connection to the eucalyptus tree, that would include the "Jelly Bush" honey you mentioned.

I did think I would get some blow back from my statement.

It's probably the areas in Aussie I brought honey from, local markets on the east coast where there is a lot of gum in the Bush.

I have not had west Australian honey and staying at my aussie relatives I just had their store brought blend.

I wish I had brought some local honey when I was in the cairns rainforest area , that would probably have tasted different

I think with the size of your farms you would have a much better chance of getting pure types of honey i.e. clover, or canola, than NZ.

What is your main honey types

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I never saw Aussie clover.

At all the markets the honey was eucalypt based. Jarrah was as expensive as NZ Manuka but it sounds like that can be a difficult honey to get with the fickleness of the flowering.

There was only one honey I tasted that I liked and that was from a friends garden hive in Gympy it was some of the yummiest honey I ever had.

 

@kaihoka Ive had the same experience at markets around the Perth area and also Queensland

@Dennis C Earnshaw does eucalypt honey granulate or is it always liquid

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Capilanos mix is certainly pretty unpalatable to my tastes but I have tried some mono floral gums and find them interesting and even palatable. Yellow box was a particularly nice one. I found it incredibly difficult to get mono floral honeys which is a real shame. Tastes vary so much between people and cultures which gives you a huge customer base and I find it hard to believe that properly marketed mono floral eucalypt honeys wouldn't sell at a real premium. Not everyone wants bland mediocrity. My friends in Canada bemoaned the fact they didn't have varietal honey's. They did of course, it was just they were so used their own honeys they couldn't see it was just a special as anyone else's. Give it a nice label identifying it to flower source and possibly geographic area and charge a premium so that people know they are getting something special.

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Hey yeah, I can see it now. "Maitai Muck"

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Hey yeah, I can see it now. "Maitai Muck"

Is that how you describe your honey :)

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Hey yeah, I can see it now. "Maitai Muck"

 

 

Is that how you describe your honey :)

 

Probably talking about his back yard. It's rained every time I've ever gone up there.

I mean the Maitai Valley of course, I have not been stalking the pink cat for years ;)

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I have not been stalking the pink cat for years ;)

Why did you stop? Short holiday? Were the rooms a bit small?

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Why did you stop? Short holiday? Were the rooms a bit small?

Constructed misunderstanding is not a lost art.

:notworthy: Sensei

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Capilanos mix is certainly pretty unpalatable to my tastes but I have tried some mono floral gums and find them interesting and even palatable. Yellow box was a particularly nice one.

Yes, I agree that Yellow Box (Eucalyptus melliodora - smell of honey) is a lovely honey.

How about Leatherwood from Tasmania ? A challenging honey, very distinctive.

And there of lots of eucalypt varieties which are pretty ordinary, or over cooked in processing, such as I had in the UK some years ago.

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Yes, I agree that Yellow Box (Eucalyptus melliodora - smell of honey) is a lovely honey.

How about Leatherwood from Tasmania ? A challenging honey, very distinctive.

And there of lots of eucalypt varieties which are pretty ordinary, or over cooked in processing, such as I had in the UK some years ago.

We were in Tasmania 6 weeks ago, we visited a lot of northern honey producers and tried a lots of honeys. I thought the leatherwood was nice but I really liked fennel honey. I was impressed with their collegiality to one another.

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I was impressed with their collegiality to one another.

 

We also had that same collegiality here in NZ...pre Manuka

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We also had that same collegiality here in NZ...pre Manuka

We hear about this stuff from the north, have you personally been hit with anti-collegthingy ?

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In most of the articles regarding Aussie Manuka that I have read, they are basically saying that Aussie Jellybush is Better than NZ manuka and they are also beginning to call all their Leptospermum plants Manuka.

They also infer that because they dont have varroa their honey is somehow cleaner and greener than ours.

 

with MPI wanting to bring in a Manuka standard possibly based on very tight guidelines and Aussie being happy to lump all their Leptospermum under the Manuka label it could be that in the near future NZ will take a back seat to other countries when it comes to things Manuka.

 

With all the talk of increasing production I wonder why we got a newsletter in the mail frim one of the big honey buyers saying they wont be buying any honey until MPI bring out a standard and market conditions improve?

 

We hear about this stuff from the north, have you personally been hit with anti-collegthingy ?

 

I think most commercial beekeepers have been @yesbut.

The biggest problem is having hives dumped over top of us. Those that do it too us dont tend to get in favours extended to them

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In most of the articles regarding Aussie Manuka that I have read, they are basically saying that Aussie Jellybush is Better than NZ manuka and they are also beginning to call all their Leptospermum plants Manuka.

They also infer that because they dont have varroa their honey is somehow cleaner and greener than ours.

 

Kind of typical tho isnt it.

Yeah, we had some interesting discussions about Manuka especially with Nicola Charles who runs Blue Hills and is the one that found the word Manuka in an article from 1920 ??(Can't remember the exact year). Even she admits the article just called it an aboriginal word without qualifying wheather they were referring to Australian aborigines or NZ aboriginal people. The Manuka we saw flowering was quite different to ours, smaller thicker leaf. As far as Nicola is concerned if it's prickly then it's leptospermum.

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We were in Tasmania 6 weeks ago, we visited a lot of northern honey producers and tried a lots of honeys. I thought the leatherwood was nice but I really liked fennel honey. I was impressed with their collegiality to one another.

I had heard fennel honey was really horrible and best fed to bees.

What is leather wood like, people have told me it's dark and strong. ,At the other end of the scale from clover.

There is a major honey industry in Chile based on the olmo tree which is a eucryphia like leather wood,

And that honey is supposed to be dark and strong

I want to plant more stuff around my place for the bees but I want to know what the honey tastes like first.

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Leatherwood tastes of leatherwood, like no other, strong, tasty, hint of acrid (and called leather for a good reason), great on porridge, toast or bread, a bit strong to eat off the spoon except in small (dessertspoonful) amounts ... would probably go very well with strong blue cheese.

Good nose.

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There is an issue with the blended Aussie honeys no doubt, much of the poor flavored honey is sent to Capilano by the big commercial beekeepers and is "mixed and blended", into something called honey and sold in the big super markets. There are some quite vile flavored honeys in WA, Peppermint, and some of the banksia varieties for example.

Blends of honey in my opinion pollute the original distinctive flavors which if a variety were presented on it's own would taste quite nice. Multiple flavors in a single honey can confuse the palette of the consumer causing customer resistance. As policy, our company only sells non blended and true labelled varieties of honey direct to the consumer and get raving reviews for them. I think it is called honesty in marketing.

Can you tell me any banksia varieties to avoid.

Some grow well in our area and are suggested for planting for bees, but i do not want to plant it if the honey tastes horrible.

The whole discussion about what does honey actually tastes like seems to be missing from our media lately.

Its all about money and health benefits and planting stuff that bees like even if the honey produced is Horrible

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I think we have to remember, when we discuss the taste of various honeys, that different people have different tastes.

I recently tried "beech honeydew". something I had been curious about for ages, and derived from the honeydew I have licked off beech trees for years when I've been out in the bush. Tasted like :crap: to me, but someone out there must like it as they keep selling it.

 

 

Leatherwood tastes of leatherwood, like no other, strong, tasty, hint of acrid (and called leather for a good reason), great on porridge, toast or bread, a bit strong to eat off the spoon except in small (dessertspoonful) amounts ... would probably go very well with strong blue cheese.

Good nose.

Not to mention how it is presented, some tastes compliment each other and can make something not-so-nice quite palatable, and vice versa as anyone who has had a beer after brushing their teeth would know.

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I had heard fennel honey was really horrible and best fed to bees.

What is leather wood like, people have told me it's dark and strong. ,At the other end of the scale from clover.

There is a major honey industry in Chile based on the olmo tree which is a eucryphia like leather wood,

And that honey is supposed to be dark and strong

I want to plant more stuff around my place for the bees but I want to know what the honey tastes like first.

I liked the fennel, my friend with me didnt. But then I like fennel as a vegetable too. Leather wood was ok, nothing to rave about... bit like Manuka isn't the nicest tasting honey.

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