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Dave Black

Aussie 'manuka'.

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You've been hearing about it in the news I 'spose. Might as well post the source. And pay attention to the Funding.

 

Cokcetin NN, Pappalardo M, Campbell LT, Brooks P, Carter DA, Blair SE, et al. (2016) The Antibacterial Activity of Australian Leptospermum Honey Correlates with Methylglyoxal Levels. PLoSONE 11(12): e0167780. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0167780

 

Abstract.

Most commercially available therapeutic honey is derived from flowering Leptospermum scoparium (manuka) plants from New Zealand. Australia has more than 80 Leptospermum species, and limited research to date has found at least some produce honey with high nonperoxide antibacterial activity (NPA) similar to New Zealand manuka, suggesting Australia may have a ready supply of medical-grade honey. The activity of manuka honey is largely due to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO), which is produced non-enzymatically from dihydroxyacetone (DHA) present in manuka nectar. The aims of the current study were to chemically quantify the compounds contributing to antibacterial activity in a collection of Australian Leptospermum honeys, to assess the relationship between MGO and NPA in these samples, and to determine whether NPA changes during honey storage. Eighty different Leptospermum honey samples were analysed, and therapeutically useful NPA was seen in samples derived from species including L. liversidgei and L. polygalifolium. Exceptionally high levels of up to 1100 mg/kg MGO were present in L. polygalifolium honey samples sourced from the Northern Rivers region in NSW and Byfield, QLD, with considerable diversity among samples. There was a strong positive relationship between NPA and MGO concentration, and DHA was present in all of the active honey samples, indicating a potential for ongoing conversion to MGO. NPA was stable, with most samples showing little change following seven years of storage in the dark at 4C. This study demonstrates the potential for Australian Leptospermum honey as a wound care product, and argues for an extension of this analysis to other Leptospermum species.

AusLeptospermum.pdf

AusLeptospermum.pdf

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Well, they're not calling it "Manuka" (y)(y)(y). And it's good to see Comvita have my best interest at heart :whistle:

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All the handwringing over Australia wanting to call their honey manuka as well. Shame on them. Mind you it's perfectly all right for New Zealand companies to blend low activity manuka with Australian jelly bush honey (one of the Aussie manuka) and then sell it all as manuka. There are Australian and Fijian kauri . If it is as good as or better and labelled with the country of origin I don't have a problem.

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Aussie manuka I like the sound of that maybe our manuka cowboys can send their hives over there to chase the flow

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Mybe nows the time to sell up here and move over while sites are still cheap and plentiful ?!

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Mybe nows the time to sell up here and move over while sites are still cheap and plentiful ?!

Nah!, Too many Australians over there.

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Nah, she's right mate ..... I married one

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Nah, she's right mate ..... I married one

So did i

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Yep .... dollar each way !

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Mybe nows the time to sell up here and move over while sites are still cheap and plentiful ?!

Nope, Comvita's already there..

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Nope, Comvita's already there..

She's a pretty big place though.

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Sure is...I remember driving 80kms off the tarseal to get to a homestead where were going hunting....massive crops as far as you can see...and then some.

Pigs galore! I can only imagine the amount of hives u would need on some of these places

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So did i

That said he has been here since 1978 so maybe he Would agreed with @Trevor Gillbanks

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Biggest problem is landing in Sydney and finding no aussies at all, just kiwis and lebbos.

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Biggest problem is landing in Sydney and finding no aussies at all, just kiwis and lebbos.

...and that's a problem because...

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It would be an epic fail if the New Zealand bee keeper community and/or the government does not protect the 'Manuka' brand name globally.

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It would be an epic fail if the New Zealand bee keeper community and/or the government does not protect the 'Manuka' brand name globally.

How can they?

I dont think its possible and a waste of time trying....

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How can they?

I dont think its possible and a waste of time trying....

 

There is law around "passing off" in NZ which basically means you can't copy or "pass off" your product as being the same as someone elses. I don't know how that applies internationally. I do know manuka is referring to Leptospermum scoparium and Aussie doesn't have any of that. Manuka is also a Maori word and Maori are indigenous to New Zealand, and the Gold Coast. Oh my argument just fell over.

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It would be an epic fail if the New Zealand bee keeper community and/or the government does not protect the 'Manuka' brand name globally.

Would be just like the flag referendum. An expensive talking point with no real outcome.

 

The word Manuka is old. It doesn't refer to a region or area. The species with that name is widespread. The experts can't decide on a standard. Its "special properties" are found in other species, in other countries and at higher levels.

 

I reckon if the NZ Manuka industry is to be saved then it would have to be consolidated under a new brand name. Zespri leverages the clean, green NZ image to good effect. The equivalent NZ Honey brand would leverage the same plus our antibiotic free approach to AFB. Look what's happening in USA with antibacterial soaps. If that concern goes global then our honey, marketed properly, could be magic and regardless of any "special properties".

 

 

I do know manuka is referring to Leptospermum scoparium and Aussie doesn't have any of that.

L. Scoparium is native to both NZ and Australia. That's according to Google so perhaps my argument just fell over :rofl:

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I think they can, through country of origin laws. You have to apply for it which I think they are.

 

Trademark registration will not work as Manuka is to generic a name and could not be claimed by 1 company.

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One of the companies complaining the loudest is quite happy to import Royal jelly, package it in containers that make it look like it comes from New Zealand and sell it back to Chinese tourists.

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Yes John I have to agree. That sort of behavior goes on all the time across many food manufacturers here. Sad really.

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If zespri couldnt pull back the term kiwifruit I dont think a group of beeks will be able to pull back manuka....

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I read an article in the business section of our local paper regarding Aussie manuka. It's interesting that trademarks have been filed for the words "Active Jellybush Honey"

We have been told by MPI that the word active cannot be used on any honey label because it doesn't conform with labelling laws in the joint Australia NZ food standard agreement or some such thing.

Why is it able to be used in Australia but not here?

Along the same lines if MPI ever get their act together and pull a manuka standard out of their hat will Australia have to comply with it or can they invent one of their own? If they can then what's the point?

The article also said that manuka was being planted in places like Portugal and Turkey sounds like the beginning of the end to me.

 

Haaaaa thanks for the edit whoever is the moderator on patrol you are right I didn't mean jellyfish :)

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The Aussies can keep their active jellyfish honey :confused:

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