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Who's thinking about harvesting a first take?


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Yes it is a bit slow although I don't expect much before mid December. I'm just hoping it warms up a bit as we are 2 or 3 degrees off historical average highs for December and once it warms up things should crank along. Where in Canterbury are you based?

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No rush Bro .... we're still flinging boxes on ..... mostly undersupering and bench pressing 40 kg boxes to the top . Waiting for water tests to come back for the shed before i am allowed to crank the machinery up.

Been like a nuclear winter today .... paddocks white with clover ... bees hanging idle about the front door .... but home sweet home the fire is going, Steine's cold in the fridge .... all is good .

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Yep, my personal use honey is coming off soon. They are capping, which is unusual. So is the lack of humidity this year.

Boxes will go back on( all 2 or 3 of them) and be refilled to go to the extraction plant mid feb with the rest of my haul

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harvesting honey it all sounds exciting, was wondering what the commercial guys do with the honey they will feed back to the hive over winter? do you take it off and put it back on later or just leave on the hive, that's assuming you guys feed honey back to your hives?

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harvesting honey it all sounds exciting, was wondering what the commercial guys do with the honey they will feed back to the hive over winter? do you take it off and put it back on later or just leave on the hive, that's assuming you guys feed honey back to your hives?

you don't feed back honey to hives, thats afb 101.

i don't think there would be many commercial beeks leaving $100k+ worth of honey on when they can feed them sugar at say $20k

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harvesting honey it all sounds exciting, was wondering what the commercial guys do with the honey they will feed back to the hive over winter? do you take it off and put it back on later or just leave on the hive, that's assuming you guys feed honey back to your hives?

 

We try and take off as much honey as we reasonably can but generally leave whatever is in the brood box even if it is a full frame capped, and then we will be feeding heavy syrup from soon after the honey is removed and through Autumn so they can build up stores for Winter.

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ok cool that makes sense, how much capped boxes of sugar syrup should a strong two box hive carry into winter in an average winter? should I be taking out all the capped honey frames when the flow has finished?

I would guess in your area between 11 and 13 frames of honey would be sweet....

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ok cool that makes sense, how much capped boxes of sugar syrup should a strong two box hive carry into winter in an average winter? should I be taking out all the capped honey frames when the flow has finished?

 

Match your brood box size to one box of stores above. If you are a begginer just leave a whole box of honey on, you should not need to feed sugar if you do it right. Commercials do it as a cost effective way of taking honey. You do not need to do that.

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I would guess in your area between 11 and 13 frames of honey would be sweet....

ok cool and would they ideally have that capped before winter sets in?

 

 

Match your brood box size to one box of stores above. If you are a begginer just leave a whole box of honey on, you should not need to feed sugar if you do it right. Commercials do it as a cost effective way of taking honey. You do not need to do that.

so for a two brood box hive leave on two capped boxes of honey?

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ok cool and would they ideally have that capped before winter sets in?

 

 

so for a two brood box hive leave on two capped boxes of honey?

 

Two brood now will usually back fill one with honey when they winter down in auutumn which will leave you one brood and one honey, job done.

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No not quite right.

 

Bees decrease in number as winter progresses, and leaving too much room in a big empty hive itself causes problems

 

What @Gavin Smith said (y)

If your bees eat all the honey over winter and you have a cold wet spring would that empty box make it hard to heat the hive.

Should you take it off and run the hive a single box

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