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NZBF Health & Safety Requirements

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I was talking to a farmer today that I have hives on his property and he brought up something that I hadn't really thought about before...health and safety requirements for beekeepers on properties that aren't their own.

e.g. say I was on his property moving hives and crashed my ute and lost a finger:oops:

 

Can someone in the know advise what are the legal requirements to satisfy health and safety when on someone else's property conducting beekeeping tasks?

 

Hope this is clear as to what I mean...!

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say I was on his property moving hives and crashed my ute and lost a finger:oops:

Well for a start you shouldn't have been picking your bum while driving

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H&S. it's a force that's growing momentum rightly or wrongly . Anyway, the intention in this case is that you access and then leave the property safely.

Farmers are now basically responsible for the H&S of people entering their farms , by law, and have to alert you to the hazards you may encounter , and the procedure to follow should and incident occur .

Some or us would expect common sense and self responsibility, but the eyes of the law do not see it this way, so the farmer has to carry the responsibility because they are liable and the repercussions, should an accident occur, can be massive.

Don't be offended should a farmer have a word with you. It's the way if the world now days and will become normal over time.

 

As a farmer, I also expect independent contractors, working on farm, to have their own H&S policy and safety procedures as I really don't want to carry the can entirely myself should something happen that is beyond my control .

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As a farmer, I also expect independent contractors, working on farm, to have their own H&S policy and safety procedures as I really don't want to carry the can entirely myself should something happen that is beyond my control .

That emphasis on individual contractors looking out for themselves and others as opposed to the site supervisor manager owner carrying the whole can is embodied in the latest H&S amendments.

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That emphasis on individual contractors looking out for themselves and others as opposed to the site supervisor manager owner carrying the whole can is embodied in the latest H&S amendments.

Is it really? That is a step forward because I made that bit up a while back and added it to my operation because I believe that's how it should be

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Homework required !!!!

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Homework required !!!!

Yes you are right. Continual upgrading and improving is part of the policy

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You need to establish whether this is a commercial or professional relationship first.

 

Some or [of] us would expect common sense and self responsibility, but the eyes of the law do not see it this way

The current law sees it exactly that way, both parties have obligations to meet and are both PCBUs (Persons Conducting a Business or Undertaking). However, it's much more one-sided if the beekeeper is just a mate down the road (hobbyist). In that case they are expected to take reasonable care and comply with the instructions from the PCBU.

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I was referring to commonsense and self responsibility of a person entering your property and using their own brains to keep themselves safe. The way it used to be before the property owner , or person in charge , became liable for others actions . Memories from a past time

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Thanks for the feedback and comments guys, that's super helpful. As M4tt says, H & S seems to be a growing movement as everyone is concerned to be right in the eyes of the law and not go for an expensive slippery slide if things do go wrong.

I think you've all given me plenty to research and chat with my farmer friend about. Thank you.

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one of my farmers approached me with a paper that he needed signed by me to be covered in case of an accident.

i didn't really read it, so i can't tell you much about the wording, but there should be a way for the landowner to cover himself.

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I wonder about the situation we came across the other night returning from moving hives into honey.

A car had come off the road into a ditch, no one hurt what happens if you lend a hand to pull them out and something goes wrong?

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I wonder about the situation we came across the other night returning from moving hives into honey.

A car had come off the road into a ditch, no one hurt what happens if you lend a hand to pull them out and something goes wrong?

I believe "The Good Samaritan" law still applies.

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I wonder about the situation we came across the other night returning from moving hives into honey.

A car had come off the road into a ditch, no one hurt what happens if you lend a hand to pull them out and something goes wrong?

emergency situation. something it pays to be prepared for.

 

couple years ago we where coming back with full load of honey. car in front went head on into oncoming vehicle. fortunately only hit the corner otherwise we would have been scraping them off the road. but still had a sliding out of control car to dodge and then stop and sort out one of them while onlookers did nothing. off course ute with supers and bees buzzing around throws a curve ball into the mix. fortunately police on the scene fairly quick and we could get out of there before we attracted more bees.

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one of my farmers approached me with a paper that he needed signed

There is nothing either of you can sign that will excuse your obligations for H&S. Perhaps he added you to his Lotto syndicate.

 

 

what happens if you lend a hand to pull them o
In Britain I used to carry insurance for that. ACC has so far prevented that sort of nonsense here, but one day...

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I had a mate pull a van off a beach with his ute and tow rope. The van rear ended him on the way out. They had no insurance . He had to pay the excess. Needless to say, his Good Samaritan behaviour cost him

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With regard to the OP there are things hobby beeks should be doing to make the life of the PCBU a happy one. Perhaps we should talk about those. Training is one that comes to mind.

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Good point Dave. Probably letting the PCBU know each time you're going onto his property is a good idea and will help the relationship. A quick text could sort that out and give him the opportunity to reply letting you know if anything has happened on the property that you should be aware of. No doubt others will have ideas on this topic?

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I wonder about the situation we came across the other night returning from moving hives into honey.

A car had come off the road into a ditch, no one hurt what happens if you lend a hand to pull them out and something goes wrong?

I think in USA you can be sued for being helpful

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In the deafening silence I've taken the time to think what I as a rural landowner with my H&S hat on would expect. I'd expect much the same if I have urban or suburban land, although not exactly the same. I'd expect different things in a commercial relationships; I think we are talking about non-contractual relationships here.

 

I expect someone coming onto the property to be skilled or knowledgeable about whatever they are doing; shooting, mountain-biking, beekeeping, whatever. Sometimes I can tell in a heartbeat if the visitor knows what they are doing, but sometimes I'm going to rely on reputation, or some kind of reference. If I didn't know about beekeepers I'd be thinking about the club they belong to, how long they've been at it, or places where they had had their bees before, to know how serious they were. They will have to be telling me these things, and I'll check with my neighbours.

I'd expect them to come prepared, to have done their homework, and I'd be politely shutting the door on anyone who arrives and says 'Hey Bro, got anywhere I can put a few hives down?' Looking through Beekeeper's risk analyses these are the sort of things you should be prepared to deal with:

 

Operating Vehicles

Using vehicles off-road

Significant injury, death from lifting equipment/vehicles etc.

Fire, burns, smoke inhalation

Working at night/working alone/working remotely

Lack of immediate emergency response

Personal violence/abuse

Environmental Conditions; Darkness/Heat/Rain etc.

Stings, toxic/anaphylactic shock

eye-damage/blindness

Cuts/abrasions

Pinch/Crush injuries

Falls from a height

Damage to property and/or hives.

Loss of bees

Slips and trips - ankle/joint injury, sprains, pain & discomfort

 

I'll expect them to be properly and independently equipped. I don't want them bogging down their front-wheel drive city-bubble. Beekeepers will have their own fire extinguisher, first aid, water, tools and PPE. They have to realise it rains too. They are not coming in to use my phone.

Yes, I want them to communicate. I want to know who is on my land at all times, because I might be out there with my dogs or my guns. A TXT or a call to say they are coming is good, so I can tell them the track is washed out, but I want to know they are here and that they have left. Being able to see, or knowing where their vehicle is, is great. I want to know their name and be able to get in touch with them, and actually I like a third party's name (an 'emergency' contact) in case of something unexpected and important. In some circumstances I expect them to be working with a buddy.

Last, I expect them to be respectful. Don't frighten the horses, don't let your dog chase the sheep, no donuts in the paddock with the ute. Know which gates should be shut, or open. Don't leave your rubbish at my place. They'll have to be especially considerate if they are here in the dark. And know that bad news travels fast.

 

So if you're new to the out-apiary game, if someone approaches me I will want evidence that they will be Skilled, Prepared, Equipped, Communicating, and Respectful, and if they can't convince me of that it's either a very short leash or no opportunity at all.

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Thanks Dave - that is some exceptional feedback. I have put a lot of this into practice already with great results.

Thank you.:) Why don't you write a health and safety manual for beekeepers and sell it for a small sum?!!

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I have put a lot of this into practice already with great results.

Such as ?

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Seeing as it will be such benefit for you to know::rolleyes:

 

 

Operating Vehicles - Using my ute instead of car as it is better suited to the terrain

Using vehicles off-road

Significant injury, death from lifting equipment/vehicles etc.

Fire, burns, smoke inhalation - Having a fire extinguisher to hand

Working at night/working alone/working remotely - Communicating to one other person when I expect to be back

Lack of immediate emergency response

Personal violence/abuse

Environmental Conditions; Darkness/Heat/Rain etc.

Stings, toxic/anaphylactic shock - Carrying Levrix with me

eye-damage/blindness

Cuts/abrasions - First aid kit in vehicle

Pinch/Crush injuries

Falls from a height

Damage to property and/or hives.

Loss of bees

Slips and trips - ankle/joint injury, sprains, pain & discomfort

 

Now how do you get on?:P

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