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DocumentUnderstanding the risks associated with Tutin 2016

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If you haven't seen the video on tutin published by the Bee Products Standards Council in 2014, we highly recommend you watch it now. Some really good information in here showing what a passionvine hopper looks like and what tutu bushes look like, along with information to help you mitigate the risk of tutin poisoning.

 

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Unsure what Tutu looks like? The video above has some good images but for more examples see below. For further information visit the NZ Plant Conservation Network website here.5992eb978b709_Tutuphotos.jpg.e006f14720f8e244f28483634bb7b63d.jpg

5992eb978b709_Tutuphotos.jpg.e006f14720f8e244f28483634bb7b63d.jpg

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Did you know that 22 people were severely poisoned by eating Tutin containing honey comb as recently as 2008? In earlier cases people have died from Tutin poisoning. As an industry we need to be vigilant. Understand the risks and be prepared by downloading and reading this resource paper and the resources referenced in it.

 

Merry Christmas everyone. We will be back with more information in the New Year.

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To ensure no repeat of past poisonings the Australian New Zealand Food Standards Code has set the maximum allowable level for Tutin in honey and honey comb at 0.7 milligram per kg. Want to be sure your honey does not exceed this limit? Check out the standard below. Food Standard: Tutin in Honey

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The Food Standard: Tutin in Honey provides the beekeeper with options to demonstrate his or her honey is free of Tutin. The recommended approach is to have all honey tested by an accredited lab but four other options are available. Understand the standard and follow this discussion for information over the coming weeks.

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Did you know that if you harvest your honey early there is no need to have it tested for Tutin? Honey from Supers put into hives on or after 1 July does not need testing if harvested no later than 31 December. Read the standard to see if this compliance approach can work for you.

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tutin_bpsc updated [plain]Understanding the risks associated with Tutin[/plain] with a new update entry:

 

[plain]Know what a pasionvine hopper looks like[/plain]

 

 

Never seen a passionvine hopper before? We suggest you familiarise yourselves with these little critters and see if they are common at this time of the year around your apiary sites. This link has some good images, some of which we have pasted below.

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Remember,...

 

Read the rest of this update entry...

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tutin_bpsc updated [plain]Understanding the risks associated with Tutin[/plain] with a new update entry:

 

[plain]Weather's influence on tutin risk[/plain]

 

 

It’s been a funny old summer. Wet, cool and windy for some. Dry and warm for others. Tutin risk is linked to nectar flow and food availability for bees. Weather has a direct influence on this. If there has been poor nectar flow in your area this summer and your bees are hungry, they may be feeding on honeydew. If your hives are near tutu bushes and there are passion vine hoppers present, there is a risk that tutin may be getting into your honey. Know the risks, mitigate against them and...

 

Read the rest of this update entry...

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