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NZBF A practical course sheet you could tick off yourself as a newish beekeeper


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For someone like me, that's a very helpful list. I'm not going to be keeping bees ever (honestly), but its all good for my understanding of things.

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LOL, I'm in my third year now and I have never let a bee walk on my bare hand. Nor have I ever marked my queens. But I will be able to tick off the varroa bits this spring, I guess.:(

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That's a good checklist. Some I will be doing this year. Don't actually own any bees yet, but doing the theory bit at present, and have two offers of mentoring once I do. And before, from one of them.

I like what you have put forward for your 2 hour intro. It covers what I had been thinking of. Some you think as natural to know, although until you get involved it wouldn't occur to think of them.

Good job(y).

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  • 1 year later...
Number 4 .... How could you do that without screaming ?

 

One of the best feelings in the world is putting your hand inside a bee swarm. It is something I like to do when there are spectators around. It show the people that the bees are not interested in killing anyone.

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related to andyk comment, one thing missing from the list and absolutely vital to beginners, is how to put on protective clothing properly.

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Number 4 is not so bad...agree with Trevor....we had quite a few of my bees (knew they were mine because I recognised them!!! ;)) in the house over summer, for some reason...use to let them crawl onto my hand and take them outside...biggest issue was getting them off said hand..took a good shake sometimes...but never felt in any danger...

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LOL, I'm in my third year now and I have never let a bee walk on my bare hand. Nor have I ever marked my queens. But I will be able to tick off the varroa bits this spring, I guess.:(

Janice,

It may be time to start not wearing gloves for some simple outside-hive activity such as using the smoker - my bees ignore me until opening the box. And they will sit on a hand or forearm, tickly - and the abdomen pulses so one may be excused for thinking "Here it comes". But they don't sting, and having lunch outside with honey means a few scouts coming round, very benign. So saying, blase .... And the stinging ones seem to be sneaky.

Courage ! and a handy tube of Anthisan.

Regards.

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Number 4 .... How could you do that without screaming ?

Try having one walking on your neck :D.

You get used to it, when you love bees. I do it all the time and I've never been stung doing it.

They don't want to sting you, it means they die.. As long as you don't squash you should be fine.

Just careful how you pick it up, don't squeeze it between your fingertips, get it to walk onto your hand.

I think bees are really cute, put it up to your face and have a closer look, they're fuzzy and glorious :D

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I think bees are really cute, put it up to your face and have a closer look, they're fuzzy and glorious :D

Fluffy and her mates....taken back when the sun use to shine... ;)

I was surprised just how hairy they were!!

 

Hope this works...

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Fluffy and her mates....taken back when the sun use to shine... ;)

I was surprised just how hairy they were!!

 

Hope this works...

She's adorable :D

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Try Drones first to get use to the feel.

I had a couple of school aged lads here one day and collected a couple of drones- they were rapt with themselves to have these drones walking on their hands, of course they then wanted to do it at school showing there mates, while others would of thought of the bees could sting them;) didn't move on to workers though.

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  • 1 year later...

This may sound silly but what about making sure you aren't allergic to stings? My hubby and I are going to get a few hives as a hobby with the hope of supplementary income. (50ish?) I'm more the hobby side, he's the income! But I don't mind cause it means we are doing it together, and since I was the first one interested I'm stoked to have him interested too, not to mention my personal hive lifterer. Anyway it's nagging away in the back of my mind as I have not been stung since a child (turned 40 this year) it sounds wussy but I can't bring myself to get a sting to check. Have been out with a friend beekeeper a few times but not stung yet however I know it's only a matter of time. Hubby is fine with stings so would not affect him. Also I am in the process of signing up for telford course hope to start in sept. Advice pls:)

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Most people are not allergic. However, anybody could be allergic to their next sting, so a test sting might not ease your mind.

I went for more than a year without being stung (I had never had a bee sting) and when I was it was a big anticlimax - no allergy and hardly any reaction.

I have since been stung lots of times and I still hate it, but still have had no bad reactions.

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@Beespleese don't acquire any more than about 5 hives. That'll be plenty for you to cut your teeth on. And with luck your wallet(s) will be ok too. I first kept bees 30 years ago, well & truly pre-varroa. My present hives I've had for 5 years, and still I manage to have at least one of them (if not both) currently on the brink of PMS death. It ain't easy all the time !!
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@yesbut we're pretty fortunate in the fact that we'll be working closely with a good friend of ours who's a commercial beekeeper (at least my hubby will be). We also have some great sites available on ours and a number of other farms around here including a couple of big manuka blocks down country where hubby used to work. It'd be a different story if we were going it alone, but working in with our friend and being able to use some of his resources and knowledge will be a big help. But you're right about effect on the wallet!!
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