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Canterbury Honey extraction contractors


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Hi Jasper m .... this extracting isn't rocket science. We can pump it into buckets or drums straight as it comes out of the extractor ,bypassing the honey hummer and then you can settle the wax out a

Crush and strain, though I prefer using a little carefully controlled heat to take the muscle work out of all the crushing and straining

 

agreed. For say one box of honey, I can't see why you'd take it to Arataki, though amazing and warming that they will do it. In regards to controlled heat, the tip we were given, was to put the two buckets in the back of the car. With a bit of sun on a nice day this will get warm enough to make the honey run through if you have crushed and fluffed with a potato masher, but it will not get so hot as to do any damage (not sure about Hastings though). Putting the wet frames with their foundation intact back into the hive to re-use, the bees have redrawn the comb exceptionally quickly. It gives ZERO chance of AFB transmission if you can put the box of wet frames straight back on the same hive. Even if you had 17 boxes, I think it is fairly easy to do a couple of boxes per week without it becoming onerous. I've always pondered small versions of wax presses. Instead of crush and strain, if you crushed and then fed to a wax press it would separate the wax and honey on the spot. It would make it fast enough to do 17 boxes or more each day. A 50kg/hr press could be more easily cleaned and shared between hobbyists and even if you got your own extractor later, the shared wax press would save buying that piece of the puzzle.. The internet is full of a number of even smaller presses that have a helical screw in them for peanut oil and such, but I still have not taken the plunge to buy one to see how it would go with a few kg of crushed wax + honey.

If you had 50 or 100 boxes, that's a whole other thing.. "not my area".

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Hi Jasper m .... this extracting isn't rocket science. We can pump it into buckets or drums straight as it comes out of the extractor ,bypassing the honey hummer and then you can settle the wax out and hey presto .... clean honey. You'll loose a little bit in the process.

We're at the end of Whitecliffs road and home most days.

We need to look after these newbees .... they might be the ones gonna buy me out so I can spend time on the yacht up in Tahiti !!

Cool as im not sure of how much ill have to extract but hopefully the girls do alright, is it hard to settle the wax out? i can give you my contact number <Number deleted by Admin> to discuss further if you like

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Just out of interest what would be a minimum quantity?

I guess the minimum quantity is one box. It's up to the beekeeper to weigh up the economics of amount of honey and distance to extractor.

Cost wise I see this as an employment scheme for two boys to provide them with funds for motorbike petrol.

Seems like every time I want to use the chainsaw or weedeater we're out of gas.

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H

 

I guess the minimum quantity is one box. It's up to the beekeeper to weigh up the economics of amount of honey and distance to extractor.

Cost wise I see this as an employment scheme for two boys to provide them with funds for motorbike petrol.

Seems like every time I want to use the chainsaw or weedeater we're out of gas.

Hey james you wouldnt have a rough price per box to use as a guide just to get an idea of what extraction is worth? I have no idea what the going rate would be

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What are you going to do with the honey once it's extracted jaspur?

Someone who would extract and buy the honey less the extraction fee could make a lot from that big hobbyist/semicommerical group.

Im hoping to find a buyer so i can pay my hive gear off, i also love honey so if i can keep abit for myself i will. The whole process is new to me so its all a learning experience

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Box price ....This years contract price from a company up north .....$15/box plus drums, palletising, labels storage etc brings their price upto about $38/box.

Clover extraction will be a bit less, assuming you supply drums/pails/ labels and take the stuff away.

Small quantities of less than a pallet - 30 boxes- $15/box. Large amounts by negotiation.

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Box price ....This years contract price from a company up north .....$15/box plus drums, palletising, labels storage etc brings their price upto about $38/box.

Clover extraction will be a bit less, assuming you supply drums/pails/ labels and take the stuff away.

Small quantities of less than a pallet - 30 boxes- $15/box. Large amounts by negotiation.

Ok cool that gives me an idea cheers, how much honey would you loose through your plant roughly on a new run?

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Counting chickens can be very humbling when you count up what has actually come in.

I run about 20 production hives, and the crop ranges from 850 Kg to zero Kg, and i leave a lot on the hives for winter.

And there are lots of uncontrollable variables.

So, what I did was to use a manual extractor for the first couple of seasons, and do it myself. And then set up a honey house which is certified (inspected a week ago under the new regs, and approved for 3 years), and still do it myself with an electrical powered extractor. Nice..

And do all the processing etc. and find it very satisfying.

But my advantage is that I have budgeted no sales at all year by year.

And as time goes by you will be able to set goals ... or not.

Regards.

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Counting chickens can be very humbling when you count up what has actually come in.

I run about 20 production hives, and the crop ranges from 850 Kg to zero Kg, and i leave a lot on the hives for winter.

And there are lots of uncontrollable variables.

So, what I did was to use a manual extractor for the first couple of seasons, and do it myself. And then set up a honey house which is certified (inspected a week ago under the new regs, and approved for 3 years), and still do it myself with an electrical powered extractor. Nice..

And do all the processing etc. and find it very satisfying.

But my advantage is that I have budgeted no sales at all year by year.

And as time goes by you will be able to set goals ... or not.

Regards.

Cool as tudor, yeah its humbling all right as there is so many variables, what type of honey do you target? and how much honey do you tend to leave on the hive for over winter? interesting to hear some one setting there own honey house up it must be very rewarding

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Yeah i was thinking that, the smaller the set up the less honey used in setting up hopefully

exactly. also what gets mixed as your probably not the first one to be done and there is the previous beeks leftovers in the pipes.

its usually the first and last person to loose out.

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