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Uncapped Mature Brood Cells


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Has it had varroa treatments?

What were the bee numbers like?

How was the hive overall?

Do they have any stores?

 

It's hard to say definitively anything from a couple of photos, I couldn't see any disease red flags in the picture but that's not a healthy hive, it could be due to varroa, it may be being robbed by wasps, there are a few possibilities.

 

I would suggest getting someone to come and have a look at it who is an experienced beekeeper if it isn't very strong, just because of the chance that it could be AFB or a combination of things that need urgent attention, maybe someone from your bee club?

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Was thinking it may be bald brood but a very new swarm so not sure

 

 

A few questions to think about..

 

Has he treated for varroa?

Did you try roping out any larvae?

Did you see any slumped or darkened larvae?

Any smell or scale?

What are the stores like, are they hungry?

 

Definitely no sunken cappings and not ropey, dark or smelly.

 

Was thinking possibly bald brood but no sign of wax moth....

 

Will advise to treat for Varroa anyway to be safe as well

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Has it had varroa treatments?

What were the bee numbers like?

How was the hive overall?

Do they have any stores?

 

It's hard to say definitively anything from a couple of photos, I couldn't see any disease red flags in the picture but that's not a healthy hive, it could be due to varroa, it may be being robbed by wasps, there are a few possibilities.

 

I would suggest getting someone to come and have a look at it who is an experienced beekeeper if it isn't very strong, just because of the chance that it could be AFB or a combination of things that need urgent attention, maybe someone from your bee club?

 

Thanks Dale.

 

Yes fairly weak as was a small swarm so could very well be getting robbed. Not a huge amount of food stores. Bee numbers were definitely growing stronger. May also advise to close the entrance up a bit and feed...

 

 

Is it hungry?

How many frames of honey does it have? Is there honey around the edges if the brood?

 

 

Yes not much in the way of stores there about half a frame of honey and some pollen. Honey volume was more than last week when I popped over (he is an old beek who can't really move at the moment).

 

Will advise to feed and treat.

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Was thinking it may be bald brood but a very new swarm so not sure

Was this swarm hived onto drawn comb?

That's definitely not new brood combs.

 

Where did the gear come from for this?

If it was put in dirty gear it could well be foulbrood, it needs varroa strips quick smart.

I always treat swarms for varroa as soon as I get them, high mite counts can cause hives to 'abscond' or swarm.

 

You should never hive swarms onto comb unless they are yours.

 

They need to use that honey in their bellys to make wax in case it is diseased honey, if they store it in to comb they are diseased.

 

If you put them in old diseased gear they become diseased.

Then you'll have to burn the lot, of course that's worst case, but it's not worth the risk.

 

You need to get someone to have a look for you.

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Was this swarm hived onto drawn comb?

That's definitely not new brood combs.

 

Where did the gear come from for this?

If it was put in dirty gear it could well be foulbrood, it needs varroa strips quick smart.

I always treat swarms for varroa as soon as I get them, high mite counts can cause hives to 'abscond' or swarm.

 

You should never hive swarms onto comb unless they are yours.

 

They need to use that honey in their bellys to make wax in case it is diseased honey, if they store it in to comb they are diseased.

 

If you put them in old diseased gear they become diseased.

Then you'll have to burn the lot, of course that's worst case, but it's not worth the risk.

 

You need to get someone to have a look for you.

 

Thanks Dale will do...

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Was thinking it may be bald brood but a very new swarm so not sure

 

 

 

Definitely no sunken cappings and not ropey, dark or smelly.

 

Was thinking possibly bald brood but no sign of wax moth....

 

Will advise to treat for Varroa anyway to be safe as well

It's not wax moth.

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I have seen this before in hives that are low on nectar stores. The brood is dry in that it isn't swimming in lots of feed. Also I am not sure if you have taken the capping off the cells in the photo, if not then the jagged edges may indicate that the bees are uncapping the brood and cannibalising it it for protein. This happens when the hive is out of nectar and pollen. Another reason for the uncapping is the hygienic behaviour of the bees towards a cell with varroa in it.

 

What to do?

 

  1. Check for adequate food stores
  2. Check for disease , AFB being the priority.
  3. If clear for AFB and food stores are OK then treat for Varroa with a fast acting compound.
  4. Monitor hive health for the next month as the population will decline if it is a varroa related issue. If you have resources to bolster the colony and the colony is in a recoverable state then the addition of a frame of capped brood almost ready to emerge and the attached nurse bees may give the hive some healthy bees to support it while recovering.

 

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That is canabalising from Starvation. You need to feed them asap. Just had two hives struggling with this from the wet spring weather. If you have dead bees in the base with their tongues out it's usually also a pretty good sign.

They usually eat the uncapped brood first before they go for the capped stuff.

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high mite counts can cause hives to 'abscond' or swarm.

i would first go for this one.

can be easy ruled out by a mite count. alcohol wash, sugar shake. or even by soaking a couple of hundred bees in soap water

 

treat if necessary and then move on to this.

 

 

stuffed queen. requeen it. not uncommon with prime swarms as its the old queen.
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You can't really tell much from the photos. If they have any honey at all then it's not starvation as they will only eat brood when all honey stores are gone. Some hives do have a genetic disposition towards not capping brood and I have seen hives in the past that were hundred percent unsealed. It never seemed to do any harm but it was something we breed against. A lot of people talk about the disease you can get from swarms but in general only healthy hives swarm. Most swarms it come down with AFB do so because they were put into dirty gear. Varoa is a possibility but once again if the hive was that bad then it shouldn't have swarmed. Having said that I always treat swarms because you don't want any varoa at all.

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