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Nigel

bee hive knocked over by cows

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Hell no we were stoked the fence was #### we wanted a new one years ago and the ##### wouldnt do it. But if my bull jumped the fence I'd say see you in court and I'd also say keep your bees off my property.

 

I'd ask you to prove they were my bees.

 

Again under the fencing act you can get a Court order to have your neighbour cover half the cost of a new fence if the existing one isn't up to scratch for their livestock

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Some interesting theories here. The fencing act says a fence only has to be able to contain the stock I intend to run. If I have pine trees on my side of the fence and my neighbour has elephants, it's the neighbours job to upgrade the fence to contain their stock. Nothing says I have to pay to keep the neighbours elephants out, only my pine trees in.

 

The bull jumped the fence so the fence wasn't up to scratch, therefore the owner of the bull is liable.

 

Law is reason free from emotion (and should be religion too) so that blows the "act of god" excuse out of the water

 

Sorry Anne but you got the raw end of the deal. Shame you're not allowed legal representation in the disputes tribunal and got a judge that didn't now the fencing act

It wasnt a Judge

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I ment referee, it's late.

 

 

The provisions of the impounding act 1955 may muddy the waters in these cases

I doubt it, who was the impounding authority and where is the entry in the impound register and consequent impound notice?

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An added electric wire on the boundary is at owners discretion, but adds a valuable extra level of security. We bound one neighbour with bulls and WE provide an electric wire on both sides the fence. I couldn't be bothered with the consequences if an accident did happen. Doesn't matter who was at fault. Bulls will easily clear a standard 9 wire post and batten fence to get to the in season cows on the other side.

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I presume the bull is is wanting to heifer good time ?

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We had a bull go awol a few years ago . Didn't like being held back in the paddock when the herd walked out , even though he had 5 mates with him . He went through 6 different farms including going straight through paddocks full of cows . Its like he just snapped . In all my years farming I've never seen anything like it . Figured we would never get him into yards that would hold him , so drove to nearest house to borrow a "bull pacifier" ! Was handed a full length stocked , open sighted 303 with a handful of 100 yr old ammo ! Followed the broken fences and caught up to the bull . He saw us when we were over 100m away and thought he would sort us out . Lined up and squeezed the trigger . Click ! Oh #### , point gun at ground and wait , bull still advancing . Ok thats long enough , pump out dud and have another go . Boom , oh #### bull's now running towards us . Took two more shots to the chest to drop him , with the last only 20m away . Could have been nasty if he had cornered someone . Once my hands stopped shaking it was back to get the fencing gear . Took 6 hrs to repair all the damage he caused . Needless to say , the dogs were well fed for a while !

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I ment referee, it's late.

 

 

I doubt it, who was the impounding authority and where is the entry in the impound register and consequent impound notice?

The Impounding Act 1955 is a law that deals with animal trespass.

It covers fencing, and liability of the parties along with guidelines for compensation

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Was the beehive a Top Bar and painted black and white, pattern similar to a Friesian:love:. Bull must have thought she was feisty. :D Was the vet call in because of the viagra effect lasting longer that it should.

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I'd ask you to prove they were my bees.

 

Again under the fencing act you can get a Court order to have your neighbour cover half the cost of a new fence if the existing one isn't up to scratch for their livestock

Will be an interesting one this year I spent 5k on fancty pants clover and I'll be telling the neighbouring commercial beek to keep his bees off it. Will lay a few feeding points if he doesn't. Any bees grazing that will be mine. I paid for it, its on my property and he'll need to fence his elephants, bulls and bees out. Or I'll take the "303" to them. I dont do black pots n kettles.

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he'll need to fence his elephants, bulls and bees out.

Hmmmm netted clover, there's a thought :rofl:

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Mum has cameras on the place - there has been some rustling so maybe I can find out if the bull was stung first?

The last part of the story is after the bull kicked in the hives he was hard out using his stung organ with the neigbours heffers!

I guess he figured he had to use it before he was to lose it?

Nigel

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Im not sure about this one.

Something tells me that fences are to keep stock out.

Again, Im not sure but I do remember being surprised about the law in this regard

think about it this way.

if fences are to keep stock out, then councils are liable for all road side fencing to keep stock off the roads.

now thats never going to happen !

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Impound act refers to the fencing act in its definition of a fence. So if a gate I'd left open then you can impound stock. If an animal goes over a fence then you can't impound it as the fence wasn't sufficient to contain the animal in the first place.

 

As for anne's "keep your bees on your property" the same argument could be made to keep anne's bees on her property so Anne will need to build sufficient fencing.

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Mums bull jumped the fence and knocked over the neighbours hives and got stung!

 

 

The last part of the story is after the bull kicked in the hives he was hard out using his stung organ with the neigbours heffers!

if i was the neighbour i'd be pretty annoyed...

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if i was the neighbour i'd be pretty annoyed...

Unless the bull was something special then you might be fairly happy.

 

Just described this discussion to the dairy farmer girlfriend who couldn't understand the emotion over a ball kicked over a fence. I said not ball, bull, horns, testicles, moo. She gets it now lol

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If the owner of the cows had a loss of productivity because the Bulls offspring weren't as good would the owner of the bull be liable?

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If the owner of the cows had a loss of productivity because the Bulls offspring weren't as good would the owner of the bull be liable?

Out of season matings the owner of the bull pays vet fees to put right. On the other hand, if the bull is superior to what the cow owner would have used anyway, then the cow owner wins.

In that circumstance, its up to the cow owner to make a decision. You wouldn't wait till the offspring were reared then declare them no good.

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think about it this way.

if fences are to keep stock out, then councils are liable for all road side fencing to keep stock off the roads.

now thats never going to happen !

I dont think the council has a joined interest in the boundary fence as does two neighbours.

When I've got some time Im going to have a good look at some impoundment act cases as there are plenty available to study.

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